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2008-09 AEIS Glossary

Updated February 2010

A printer-friendly version of the Glossary is available as a PDF download.

A translation in Spanish, the Glosario, is also available.

Accountability Rating: This refers to the district and campus ratings assigned by the 2009 state accountability system. Districts and campuses are evaluated on performance on the TAKS, completion rate, and annual dropout rate. Possible ratings are:

  • Exemplary;
  • Recognized;
  • Academically Acceptable;
  • Academically Unacceptable;
  • Not Rated: Other; and
  • Not Rated: Data Integrity Issues.

The above ratings apply to districts (including charter operators) and schools rated under the standard accountability procedures.

Additionally, alternative education accountability (AEA) ratings are issued to campuses and charters registered to be evaluated under AEA procedures. Possible AEA ratings are:

  • AEA: Academically Acceptable;
  • AEA: Academically Unacceptable; and
  • AEA: Not Rated - Other.

For a more detailed explanation of the accountability system, see the 2009 Accountability Manual available at ritter.tea.state.tx.us/perfreport/account/2009/manual/.

Accountability Subset: This refers to the group of non-mobile students whose performance on the TAKS is used in determining a school's and district's accountability rating. Specifically, the subsets have been calculated as follows:

Campus-level accountability subset: If a student was reported in membership at one campus on October 31, 2008, but moves to another campus before the TAKS test, that student's performance was removed from the accountability results for both campuses, whether the campuses were in the same district or different districts. Campuses were held accountable only for those students reported to be enrolled in the campus in the fall and tested in the same campus in the second semester.

District-level accountability subset: If a student was in one district on October 31, 2008, but then moved to another district before the TAKS test, that student's performance was taken out of the accountability subset for both districts. However, if the student moved from campus to campus within the district, his or her performance was included in that district's results, even though it did not count for either campus. This means that district performance results do not match the sum of the campus performance results.

TAKS Participation, included in the AEIS report, shows what percent of a district's or school's test takers are mobile and are not included in the Accountability Subset. For additional information and examples of how the accountability subset is determined, see Chapter 2 of the 2009 Accountability Manual. Also see Mobile, TAKS Participation, and Appendix E.

Adopted Tax Rate (calendar year 2008) (District Profile only): This is the locally adopted tax rate set for the 2008 calendar year. The total adopted rate is composed of a maintenance and operation rate (M&O) and a debt service rate (sometimes referred to as the Interest and Sinking fund rate). Rates are expressed per $100 of taxable value. Taxes based on this rate were to be paid by taxpayers in early 2009. The state value shown for the adopted tax rates is the simple average of all the district rates. (Source: Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, July 2009)

Advanced Course/Dual Enrollment Completion: This indicator is based on a count of students who complete and receive credit for at least one advanced course in grades 9-12. Advanced courses include dual enrollment courses. Dual enrollment courses are those for which a student gets both high school and college credit. Deciding who gets credit for which college course is described in Texas Administrative Code §74.25 which states, in part:

(b) To be eligible to enroll and be awarded credit toward state graduation requirements, a student must have the approval of the high school principal or other school official designated by the school district. The course for which credit is awarded must provide advanced academic instruction beyond, or in greater depth than, the essential knowledge and skills for the equivalent high school course.

Appendix C lists all courses identified as advanced, with the exception of courses designated only as dual enrollment. Dual enrollment courses are not shown, as the courses vary from campus to campus and could potentially include a large proportion of all high school courses.

Course completion information is reported by districts through the Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS) after the close of the school year. The values, expressed as a percent, are calculated as follows:

number of students in grades 9-12 who received credit for at least
one advanced or dual enrollment course in 2007-08
divided by
number of students in grades 9-12 who completed at least one course in 2007-08

Schools and districts may qualify for Gold Performance Acknowledgment for advanced course/dual enrollment completion. For a more detailed explanation of Gold Performance Acknowledgment, see Chapter 5 of the 2009 Accountability Manual.

Special education students are included in the results shown for the campus or district and the individual student groups. For purposes of comparison, course completion rates are also shown for the prior year (2006-07). For a list of advanced courses, see Appendix C. (Source: PEIMS, June 2008, June 2007)

Advanced Placement Examinations: See AP/IB Results.

All Funds: Financial information is broken down by fund type (general fund only and all funds). All Funds consists of four fundamental fund groups: General Fund (fund codes 101-199 and 420), Special Revenue Funds (fund codes 200/300/400), Debt Service Funds (fund code 599), and Capital Projects Funds (fund codes 601 and 699). It also includes the Enterprise Fund, and the National School Breakfast and Lunch Program (fund code 701). Within the general fund, fund code 420-Foundation School Program and Other State Aid-is used by charter operators only.

Note that all financial data shown by fund is actual data, not budgeted. Accordingly, the information is from the prior year (2007-08). See Appendix B. (Source: PEIMS, March 2009)

Annual Dropout Rate: Three annual dropout rate indicators are shown:

(1)Annual Dropout Rate (Gr 7-8). This includes only grades 7 and 8. This rate is used in determining a campus accountability rating under standard procedures (for campuses that have one or both of those grades) or the district's rating. It is calculated as follows:

number of dropouts in grades 7 and 8 during the 2007-08 school year
divided by
number of grade 7 and 8 students who were in attendance at any time during the 2007-08 school year

(2)Annual Dropout Rate (Gr 7-12). This includes grades 7 through 12. This rate is used in determining a campus or charter operator accountability rating under AEA procedures (for campuses or charters that have one or more of those grades). It is calculated as follows:

number of dropouts in grades 7 through 12 during the 2007-08 school year
divided by
number of grade 7-12 students who were in attendance at any time during the 2007-08 school year

(3)Annual Dropout Rate (Gr 9-12). This includes grades 9 through 12. This measure shows the dropout rates for the high school grades. It is a report-only measure and is not used in determining accountability ratings. It is calculated as follows:

number of dropouts in grades 9 through 12 during the 2007-08 school year
divided by
number of grade 9-12 students who were in attendance at any time during the 2007-08 school year

For the accountability ratings of 2007 and 2008, the School Leaver Provision was in place to aid in the transition to a more rigorous dropout definition. This provision exempted schools and districts from having their accountability rating lowered due to their annual dropout rate. This provision is no longer in effect for the 2009 ratings. See Appendix I of the 2009 Accountability Manual for more information on the dropout definition.

All three annual rates appear on district, region, and state-level AEIS reports. Reports for secondary campuses evaluated under standard procedures show the grade 7-8 and grade 9-12 rates. Reports for secondary campuses evaluated under AEA procedures show the grade 7-8 and grade 7-12 rates.

Note that with all annual dropout rate calculations, a cumulative count of students is used in the denominator. This method for calculating the dropout rate neutralizes the effects of mobility by including in the denominator every student ever reported in attendance at the campus or district throughout the school year, regardless of length of stay. For a more complete description of dropout rates, see the Secondary School Completion and Dropouts in Texas Public Schools, 2007-08 reports, available at http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index4.aspx?id=4080. See also Dropout and Leaver Record. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2007, Oct. 2008 and June 2008)

AP/IB Results: These refer to the results of the College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) examinations and the International Baccalaureate Organization's International Baccalaureate (IB) examinations taken by Texas public school students. High school students may take these examinations, ideally upon completion of AP or IB courses, and may receive advanced placement or credit, or both, upon entering college. Generally, colleges will award credit or advanced placement for scores of 3, 4, or 5 on AP examinations and scores of 4, 5, 6, or 7 on IB examinations. Requirements vary by college and by subject tested.

Three values are calculated for this indicator:

(1) Tested. This shows the percent of students in grades 11 and 12 taking at least one AP or IB examination:

number of 11th and 12th grade students taking at least one AP or IB examination
divided by
number of non-special education 11th and 12th grade students

(2) Examinees >= Criterion. The percent of examinees with at least one AP or IB score at or above the criterion score (3 on AP or 4 on IB):

number of 11th and 12th graders with at least one score at or above criterion
divided by
number of 11th and 12th graders with at least one AP or IB examination

(3) Scores >= Criterion. This shows the percent of scores at or above the criterion score (3 on AP or 4 on IB):

number of 11th and 12th grade AP & IB examination scores at or above criterion
divided by
number of 11th and 12th grade AP & IB examination scores

The denominator of equation (1) does not include 11th and 12th grade students served in special education; however, all students who took at least one AP or IB examination are included in the numerator. The performance of special education students is included in both the numerator and denominator of the other equations.

Schools and districts may qualify for Gold Performance Acknowledgment for participation and performance on AP/IB results (measures (1) and (2) above). For a more detailed explanation of Gold Performance Acknowledgment, see the 2009 Accountability Manual. See also Criterion Score. (Sources: The College Board, Aug. 2008, Jan. 2008; The International Baccalaureate Organization, Aug. 2008, Aug. 2007; and PEIMS, Oct. 2008, Oct. 2007)

ARD: This refers to the Admission, Review, and Dismissal committee that determines the individual education plan for every student served in special education. See also Special Education and TAKS Participation.

At-Risk: A student is identified as at risk of dropping out of school based on state-defined criteria (§TEC 29.081.) At-risk status is obtained from the PEIMS 110 records. The percent of at-risk students is calculated as the sum of the students coded as at risk, divided by the total number of students in membership:

number of students coded as at-risk
divided by
total number of students

A column showing at-risk student performance is shown on the district, region, and state reports. While this column is not available on the campus-level reports, counts of at-risk students are shown in the Profile section of the campus reports (as well as the district, region, and state reports).

The statutory criteria for at-risk status include each student who is under 21 years of age and who:

  1. was not advanced from one grade level to the next for one or more school years;
  2. is in grades 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12 and did not maintain an average equivalent to 70 on a scale of 100 in two or more subjects in the foundation curriculum during a semester in the preceding or current school year or is not maintaining such an average in two or more subjects in the foundation curriculum in the current semester;
  3. did not perform satisfactorily on an assessment instrument administered to the student under TEC Subchapter B, Chapter 39, and who has not in the previous or current school year subsequently performed on that instrument or another appropriate instrument at a level equal to at least 110 percent of the level of satisfactory performance on that instrument;
  4. is in prekindergarten, kindergarten or grades 1, 2, or 3 and did not perform satisfactorily on a readiness test or assessment instrument administered during the current school year;
  5. is pregnant or is a parent;
  6. has been placed in an alternative education program in accordance with §TEC 37.006 during the preceding or current school year;
  7. has been expelled in accordance with §TEC 37.007 during the preceding or current school year;
  8. is currently on parole, probation, deferred prosecution, or other conditional release;
  9. was previously reported through the PEIMS to have dropped out of school;
  10. is a student of limited English proficiency, as defined by §TEC 29.052;
  11. is in the custody or care of the Department of Protective and Regulatory Services or has, during the current school year, been referred to the department by a school official, officer of the juvenile court, or law enforcement official;
  12. is homeless, as defined by 42 U.S.C. Section 11302 and its subsequent amendments; or
  13. resided in the preceding school year or resides in the current school year in a residential placement facility in the district, including a detention facility, substance abuse treatment facility, emergency shelter, psychiatric hospital, halfway house, or foster group home.

(Sources: PEIMS, Oct. 2008; Texas Education Code, 79th Texas Legislature)

Attendance Rate: Attendance rates reported in AEIS are based on student attendance for the entire school year. Only students in grades 1-12 are included in the calculations. Attendance is calculated as follows:

total number of days students were present in 2007-08
divided by
total number of days students were in membership in 2007-08

Schools and districts may qualify for Gold Performance Acknowledgment based on their attendance rate. For a more detailed explanation of Gold Performance Acknowledgment, see the 2009 Accountability Manual.

Attendance rates are shown for 2007-08 and 2006-07. (Source: PEIMS, June 2008, June 2007)

Auxiliary Staff (District Profile only): This shows the Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) count of staff reported without a role but with a PEIMS employment and payroll record. Counts of auxiliary staff are expressed as a percent of total staff. For auxiliary staff, the FTE is simply the value of the percent of day worked. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Average Actual Salaries (regular duties only): For each professional staff type, the total salary is divided by the total FTE count of staff who receives that salary. The total actual salary amount is pay for regular duties only and does not include supplemental payments for coaching, band and orchestra assignments, and club sponsorships. See Appendix A for lists of the PEIMS role IDs included in each category shown.

Teachers. This includes teachers, special duty teachers, and substitute teachers. Substitute teachers are persons hired to replace a teacher who has quit, died, or been terminated; or, persons permanently hired on an as-needed basis.

Campus Administration. This includes principals, assistant principals, and other administrators reported with a specific school ID.

Central Administration. This includes superintendents, presidents, chief executive officers, chief administrative officers, business managers, athletic directors, and other administrators that are reported with a central office ID and not a specific school ID.

Professional Support. This includes therapists, nurses, librarians, counselors, and other campus professional personnel.

A half-time employee with a reported actual salary of $30,000 has a full-time equivalent salary of $60,000. All average salaries are expressed in full-time equivalent form by dividing the sum of the actual salaries earned by the total FTE count. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Average Teacher Salary by Years of Experience (regular duties only): Total pay for teachers within each experience group is divided by the total teacher FTE for the group. The total actual salary amount is pay for regular duties only and does not include supplements. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Average Years Experience of Teachers: Weighted averages are obtained by multiplying each teacher's FTE count by years of experience. These amounts are summed for all teachers and divided by the total teacher FTE count, resulting in the averages shown. This measure refers to the total number of (completed) years of professional experience for the individual in any district. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Average Years Experience of Teachers with District: Weighted averages are obtained by multiplying each teacher's FTE count by years of experience. These amounts are summed for all teachers and divided by the total teacher FTE count, resulting in the averages shown. This measure refers to tenure, i.e., the number of years employed in the reporting district, whether or not there has been any interruption in service.

Bilingual Education/English as a Second Language Report: Changes to §TEC 39.051 passed during the 80th Legislative Session (2007) require districts to report performance for selected AEIS indicators disaggregated by bilingual and ESL instructional models. To accommodate this new requirement, a new section, Section III, shows this performance disaggregated by nine columns for students identified as LEP in 2008-09.

Current LEP students receiving either Bilingual Education (BE) or English as a Second Language (ESL) program services are presented as a total as well as disaggregated by program instructional model within BE and ESL. Results are also shown for current LEP students who did not receive any BE/ESL services.

The indicators shown are: The TAKS 2009 accountability base indicator; the SSI indicators (measures 1 and 2 only), and the Progress of Prior Year Failers (percent passing only).

Four columns shown in Section III are repeated from Section I: State, Region, District, and Total LEP.

Section III has been added to district, region, and state AEIS reports. The information is not calculated or reported at the campus level. Only one year of data can be shown, as the BE and ESL instructional model data was first collected during the 2008-09 school year.

For more information on this new section, see the sample in Appendix I. See also TAKS, Student Success Initiative, and Progress of Prior Year TAKS Failers. For definitions of the BE/ESL instructional model types, see the PEIMS Data Standards.

Campus Group: Each campus is assigned to a unique comparison group of 40 other public schools (from anywhere in the state), that closely matches that campus on six characteristics. Comparison groups are provided so that schools can compare their performance to that of other schools with whom they are demographically similar. Comparison groups are also used for determining the Comparable Improvement Gold Performance Acknowledgments.

The demographic characteristics used to construct the campus comparison groups include those defined in statute as well as others found to be statistically related to performance. They are:

  • the percent of African American students enrolled for 2008-09;
  • the percent of Hispanic students enrolled for 2008-09;
  • the percent of White students enrolled for 2008-09;
  • the percent of economically disadvantaged students enrolled for 2008-09;
  • the percent of limited English proficient (LEP) students enrolled for 2008-09; and
  • the percent of mobile students as determined from 2007-08 cumulative attendance.

All schools are first grouped by type (elementary, middle, secondary, or multi-level). Then the group is determined on the basis of the most predominant features at the target school. For example, assume a high school has 40.5% African American, 20.9% Hispanic, 32.5% White, 35.6% economically disadvantaged, 11.2% limited English proficient, and 21.7% mobile students. Of these features, the most predominant (i.e., the largest) is the percent of African American students, followed by the percent of economically disadvantaged students, the percent of White students, the percent of mobile students, the percent of Hispanic students, and finally, the percent of limited English proficient students. The following steps illustrate the group identification process:

Step 1: 100 secondary campuses having percentages closest to 40.5% African American are identified;

Step 2: 10 schools from the initial group of 100 are eliminated on the basis of being most distant from the value of 35.6% economically disadvantaged;

Step 3: 10 of the remaining 90 schools that are most distant from 32.5% White students are eliminated;

Step 4: 10 of the remaining 80 schools that are most distant from 21.7% mobile students are eliminated;

Step 5: 10 of the remaining 70 schools that are most distant from 20.9% Hispanic students are eliminated;

Step 6: 10 of the remaining 60 schools that are most distant from 11.2% limited English proficient students are eliminated; and

Step 7: 10 of the remaining 50 schools that are most distant from 20.9% Hispanic students and/or 32.5% White students are eliminated. (This last reduction step is based on the least predominant characteristics among the four student groups evaluated in the accountability system: African American, Hispanic, White, and economically disadvantaged.)

The final group size is 40 schools. This methodology creates a unique comparison group for every campus. Please note the following:

  • With this methodology, the number of times a school appears as a member of other groups will vary.
  • In cases where the campus has a missing mobility value, the district's average mobility is used as a proxy. This will happen for schools in their first year of operation.
  • Districts are not grouped.

In the Performance section of a campus AEIS report, the value given in the Campus Group column is the median of the values from the 40-school group for that campus. (The median is defined as that point in the distribution of values, above and below which one-half of the values fall.) In the Profile section of the report, the value given in the Campus Group column is the average value. If a report contains question marks (?) in the Campus Group column, this means there were too few schools in the comparison group (specifically, fewer than 25 schools) to have confidence in the median values. Such small numbers are considered too unstable to provide an adequate comparison group value.

See Comparable Improvement and Texas Growth Index.

Campus #: The campus number is the unique 9-digit identifying number assigned to every Texas public school. It consists of the county number (assigned alphabetically from 001 to 254), followed by the district number (9-- is used primarily for regular districts, 8-- for charter operators), and ending with the campus number (generally 00- for high schools, 04- for middle schools, and 1-- for elementary schools).

Class Size Averages by Grade and Subject: These values show the average class size for elementary classes (by grade) and for secondary classes (by subject) for selected subjects. Districts do not report actual class size averages. The class size averages are computed by the TEA based on the teacher role and class schedule information reported in the PEIMS 090 record by the district each fall. The following principles are used in deriving the average class sizes:

  1. classes identified as serving regular, compensatory/remedial, gifted and talented, career and technical, and honors students are included in the calculation;
  2. subjects in the areas of English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, foreign language, computer science, business education, career and technical, and self-contained are included in the calculation;
  3. classes where the number of students served is reported to be zero are not included in the calculation;
  4. service codes with the "SR" prefix are not included in the calculation;
  5. only teacher roles coded as "special duty teacher," "teacher, " and "substitute teacher" are included in the calculation;
  6. only class settings coded as "regular class" are included in the calculation;
  7. missing partial FTE counts are not included in the calculation;
  8. if a teacher teaches more than one class at the same time, the records are combined into a single class; and
  9. elementary classes where the number of students exceeds 100 are excluded from the calculation.

The methodology differs depending on whether the class is elementary or secondary due to differences in reporting practices for these two types of teacher schedules. For secondary classes, each unique combination of teacher and class time is counted as a class. Averages are determined by summing the number of students served (in a given subject at the campus) and dividing by the calculated count of classes.

For elementary classes, the number of records reported for each grade is considered. For example, a teacher teaching a variety of subjects to the same group of fourth graders all day should have only one record indicating the total number of fourth grade students served. However, an elementary teacher who teaches a single subject to five different sections of fourth graders each day will have five separate records reported, each with a unique count of students served. Average class sizes are calculated by summing all the students served (in a given grade at the campus) and dividing by the sum of the teacher FTE counts for those records. So, for example, a full-time mathematics teacher with five sections of fourth graders, with 20 different students in each, would have an average of 100/5 or 20 students.

College Admissions Tests: See SAT/ACT Results.

College Readiness Indicators: These indicators are grouped together to help provide a picture of college preparedness at a given high school. They can be used by educators as they work to ensure that students are able to perform college-level course work at institutions of higher education.

The indicators include:

  • Advanced Course/Dual Enrollment Completion;
  • Recommended High School Program/Distinguished Achievement Program Graduates;
  • AP/IB Results;
  • Texas Success Initiative (TSI) Higher Education Readiness Component;
  • SAT/ACT Results; and
  • College-Ready Graduates.

College-Ready Graduates: To be considered college-ready as defined by this indicator, a graduate must have met or exceeded the college-ready criteria on the TAKS exit-level test, or the SAT test, or the ACT test. The criteria for each are:

Subject

Exit-level TAKS

 

SAT

 

ACT

ELA

>= 2200 scale score on ELA test
AND
a "3";or higher on essay

OR

>=500 on Critical Reading
AND
>=1070 Total

OR

>= 19 on English
AND
>= 23 Composite

Math

>= 2200 scale score on mathematics test

OR

>=500 on Math
AND
>=1070 Total

OR

>= 19 on Math AND
>= 23 Composite

Three values are calculated for this indicator:

(1) Eng Lang Arts. This shows the percent of graduates who scored at or above the criterion score on the TAKS, SAT, or ACT English language arts tests.

number of graduates who scored at or above the College-Ready criterion for ELA
divided by
number of graduates (class of 2008) with ELA results to evaluate

(2) Mathematics. This shows the percent of graduates who scored at or above the criterion score on the TAKS, SAT, or ACT mathematics tests.

number of graduates who scored at or above the College-Ready criterion for mathematics
divided by
number of graduates (class of 2008) with mathematics results to evaluate

(3) Both Subjects. This shows the percent of graduates who scored at or above the criterion score on both the TAKS, SAT, or ACT ELA and mathematics tests.

number of graduates who scored at or above the College-Ready criteria on both ELA & mathematics
divided by
number of graduates (class of 2008) with results in both subjects to evaluate

This indicator differs from the TSI - Higher Education Readiness Component, in several ways:

  • it includes performance on the SAT and ACT;
  • it is based on prior year graduates rather than current year 11th graders;
  • it provides an overall measure of both subjects combined; and
  • performance is tied to the campus and district where the student graduated, while the TSI indicator uses the campus and district where the TAKS tests were administered.

Performance on the exit-level TAKS includes performance on TAKS (Accommodated).

Schools and districts may qualify for Gold Performance Acknowledgment for performance on the College-Ready Graduates indicator (measure 3 above). For a more detailed explanation of Gold Performance Acknowledgment, see Chapter 5 of the 2009 Accountability Manual. (Sources: TEA Student Assessment Division, The College Board, Aug. 2008, Aug. 2009, ACT, Inc. Oct. 2008, Oct. 2007; and PEIMS, Oct. 2008, Oct. 2007)

Commended Performance: See TAKS Commended.

Community Services (2007-08) (District Profile only): Expenditures for activities or purposes other than regular public education. These are activities relating to the whole community, such as the operation of a school library, swimming pool, and playgrounds for the public (objects 6100-6400, function 61). Community Services expenditures are shown as a stand-alone amount and are not included in total operating expenditures.

Note this item is reported as actual expenditures, not budgeted. Accordingly, the information is from the prior year (2007-08). See also Appendix B. (Source: PEIMS, March 2009)

Comparable Improvement: Comparable Improvement (CI) is a measure that calculates how student performance on the TAKS mathematics and reading/ELA tests has changed (or grown) from one year to the next, and compares the change to that of the 40 schools that are demographically most similar to the target school.

CI is calculated separately for reading/ELA and mathematics, based on individual student Texas Growth Index (TGI) values. The student-level TGI values are aggregated to the campus level to create an average TGI for each campus. The average TGI values for the 40 member group are rank ordered. Schools in the first quartile (i.e. top 10 schools of the 40 in their campus group), receive Gold Performance Acknowledgment for CI.

See Chapter 5 of the 2009 Accountability Manual for an explanation of Gold Performance Acknowledgments. For a detailed explanation of TGI, see Appendix E of the 2009 Accountability Manual. See also Campus Group, Texas Growth Index, and Appendix D.

Completion Rate: This indicator shows the status of a group (cohort) of students after four years in high school. The cohort consists of students who first attended ninth grade in 2004-05. They are followed through their expected graduation as the class of 2008. Any student who transferred into the 2004-05 cohort is added to it, and any student who transfers out of the 2004-05 cohort is subtracted from it.

  • A student who transfers into the cohort is one who, for example, moves into the cohort from another high school in Texas or from out of state.
  • A student who transfers out of the cohort is one who, for example, moves to another public high school in Texas; note that these students are then transferred into the cohort of the receiving high school and district. There are also students who move out of the state or out of the country, or students who transfer to private schools or who are home-schooled. These types of transfers cannot be tracked, and students who leave for these reasons are not included in completion rate calculations.
  • Students do not change cohorts even if they repeat a grade or skip a grade. If they begin with the 2004-05 ninth grade cohort, they remain with that cohort. This means, for example, that a student who started the ninth grade in 2004-05, but takes 6 years to graduate (i.e., in May 2010) is still part of the 2004-05 cohort; they are not switched to the 2006-07 cohort. This student would be considered a continuing student, and counted as part of the Continued HS number for the class of 2008.

Other important information:

  • Dropouts are counted according to the dropout definition in place the year they drop out. The definition changed in 2005-06. Completion rates for classes in which the new dropout definition is being phased in (i.e., classes of 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009) are not comparable to completion rates for prior classes, nor to each other.
  • Special Education students who graduate with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) are included as graduates.
  • This indicator is computed and reported for districts as well as for high schools that served grade 9 and either grade 11 or grade 12 in both the first year of the cohort and in the fall following the cohort's expected graduation. Campuses that only serve some of these grades or that have been in existence for fewer than five years do not show a completion rate.

The four student outcomes used in computing the longitudinal rates are:

(1) Graduated. Based on the 2004-05 cohort, this shows the percent who received their high school diploma on time or earlier - by August 31, 2008. It is calculated as follows:

number of students from the cohort who received a high school diploma by August 31, 2008
divided by
number of students in the 2004-05 cohort*

(2) Received GED. Based on the 2004-05 cohort, this shows the percentage who received a General Educational Development certificate by August 31, 2008. It is calculated as follows:

number of students from the cohort who received a GED
divided by
number of students in the 2004-05 cohort*

(3) Continued High School. Based on the 2004-05 cohort, this shows the percentage still enrolled as students in the fall of the 2008-09 school year. It is calculated as follows:

number of students from the cohort who were enrolled for the 2008-09 school year
divided by
number of students in the 2004-05 cohort*

(4) Dropped Out (4-yr). Based on the 2004-05 cohort, this shows the percentage who dropped out and did not return by the fall of the 2008-09 school year. It is calculated as follows:

number of students from the cohort who dropped out before the fall of the 2008-09 school year
divided by
number of students in the 2004-05 cohort*

* The cohort in the denominator of the formulas shown above includes those students who graduated, continued in school, received a GED, or dropped out. It does not include data errors or leavers with the following leaver reason codes. See the following table (note that the leaver reason codes vary, based on year):

School Year

Leaver reason codes NOT included in the longitudinal rate calculations

2004-05

03, 16, 19, 21, 22, 24, 30, 31, 60, 61, 63, 64, 66, 72, 78, 80, 81, 82, 83

2005-06

03, 16, 24, 60, 66, 78, 81, 82, 83, 85, 86

2006-07

03, 16, 24, 60, 66, 78, 81, 82, 83, 85, 86, 87

2007-08

03, 16, 24, 60, 66, 78, 81, 82, 83, 85, 86, 87

These four outcomes sum to 100% (some totals may not equal exactly 100% due to rounding).

For the 2008-09 AEIS reports, the completion rate is shown three different ways:

(1) Completion/Student Status Rate. This shows all of the above measures separately. The prior rates (class of 2007) are also shown.

(2) Completion Rate II (w/GED). This indicator sums together the first three of the above outcomes: the percent of students in the 2004-05 cohort who received their high school diplomas by August 31, 2008, those who received GEDs by August 31, 2008, and those who were still enrolled as high school students for the 2008-09 school year. This rate is used for determining the alternative education accountability ratings.

(3) Completion Rate I (w/o GED). This indicator sums together the first and third of the above outcomes: the percent of students in the 2004-05 cohort who received their high school diplomas by August 31, 2008 and those who were still enrolled as high school students for the 2008-09 school year. This rate is used for determining the standard accountability ratings.

Completion rates for districts serving Texas Youth Commission or Texas Juvenile Probation Commission facilities do not include students from the facilities unless the students have been attributed to regular campuses in the district of service through campus of accountability procedures.

For further information on these rates, see the report Secondary School Completion and Dropouts in Texas Public Schools, 2007-08. (Sources: PEIMS, Oct. 2008, June 2008, Oct. 2007, June 2007, Oct. 2006, June 2006, Oct. 2005, June 2005, Oct. 2004, June 2004, June 2003, June 2002, and General Educational Development Information File)

Completion/Student Status Rate: See Completion Rate.

Criterion Score: This refers to the scores on the SAT and ACT college admissions tests, the AP and IB tests, and the College-Ready Graduates indicator. For college admissions tests, the criterion scores are at least 24 on the ACT (composite) and at least 1110 on the SAT (total). For AP and IB tests, the criterion scores are at least 3 on AP tests, and at least 4 on IB tests. For College-Ready Graduates criterion scores, see College-Ready Graduates.

Please note that each college and university establishes its own score criteria for admitting or granting advanced placement or credit to individual students. See also SAT/ACT Results and AP/IB Results.

Data Quality (District Profile only): The AEIS reports show the percent of errors a district made in two key data submissions: 1) the PID Error rate in PEIMS Student Data, and 2) the percent of Underreported Students in PEIMS Student Leaver Data.

(1) PID Error Rate. The Person Identification Database (PID) system ensures that each time information is collected for a student, the identifying information matches other data collections for that student. This allows student data to be linked, such as enrollment records, which are collected in October, to attendance records, which are collected in June; or data to be matched across years. It also helps maintain student confidentiality by assigning an ID that does not divulge the student's identifying information.

During the data submission process each district has the ability to run PID Discrepancy Reports that show any PID errors found. The district then has time to correct the errors before its submission is finalized. While the PID error rate has declined significantly over the years, any amount of error has a detrimental effect on the calculation of longitudinal measures such as the four-year dropout rate and the high school completion rate. The AEIS reports show the PID error rate in PEIMS Student Data, collected in Submission 1 (October 2008).

The rate is calculated as follows:

number of student PID errors found in PEIMS submission 1 (fall 2008)
divided by
number of student records in PEIMS submission 1 (fall 2008)

(2) Percent of Underreported Students. Underreported students are 7th-12th graders who were enrolled at any time the prior year and who were not accounted for through district records or TEA processing in the current year. A district is required to submit a leaver record for any student served in grades 7-12 the previous year, unless the student received a GED certificate by August 31, is a previous Texas public school graduate, moved to another Texas public school district, or returned to the district by the end of the school start window (for this year's AEIS report, that was October 24, 2008). Leaver reasons include: graduated, died, or dropped out. (For a more complete definition of leavers, see Leaver Records.)

The rate is calculated as follows:

number of underreported students
divided by
number of grade 7-12 students who were served in the district in the 2007-08 school year

Under the accountability rating system, there have been consequences for districts that exceeded certain thresholds for this measure. For 2009, in order to receive a rating of Exemplary or Recognized, a district's percent and number of underreported students could not exceed 5.0% or 150, respectively.

Distinguished Achievement Program: See RHSP/DAP Graduates.

Dropout: A dropout is a student who is enrolled in public school in grades 7-12, does not return to public school the following fall, is not expelled, and does not graduate, receive a GED, continue school outside the public school system, begin college, or die.

Dropout counts are obtained from PEIMS records. Based on the attendance and enrollment records of all districts, the records of Texas graduates for the last several years, and GED certificate records, TEA identifies students for whom districts do not need to submit leaver records. School districts must account for all other students through the submission of leaver reasons. The leaver record provides 14 possible reasons for leaving school, including one which indicates the student is a dropout (98).

See Appendix I of the 2009 Accountability Manual for information on the dropout definition. See also Annual Dropout Rate. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Dropout Rate: See Annual Dropout Rate.

Economically Disadvantaged: The percent of economically disadvantaged students is calculated as the sum of the students coded as eligible for free or reduced-price lunch or eligible for other public assistance, divided by the total number of students:

number of students coded as eligible for free or reduced-price lunch or other public assistance
divided by
total number of students

See also Campus Group and Total Students. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008, Oct. 2007; and TEA Student Assessment Division)

Educational Aides: Educational aides are staff who are reported with a role of 033 (Educational Aide), 036 (Certified Interpreter), or 037 (Non-Certified Interpreter). These aides are referred to as paraprofessional staff. The FTE counts of educational aides are expressed as a percent of the total staff FTE. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

English Language Learners Progress Measure (2011 Preview): This measure is new for 2008-09. It is a preview indicator in anticipation of its first possible use in the accountability system in 2011. Only one year is available. See Appendix H for a detailed description of the methodology for this indicator and for the assessment results used.

Enrollment: See Total Students.

Equity Transfers (2007-08) (District Profile only): The amount "excluded from revenues" is the expenditures reported by districts for reducing their property wealth to the required equalized wealth level (function 91). The amount "excluded from expenditures" is the expenditures reported by districts for the cost of reducing their property wealth to the required equalized wealth level (function 91). Payments to Charter Schools (function 96) are also included in both items in this category.

Note this item is reported as actual expenditures, not budgeted. Accordingly, the information is from the prior year (2007-08). See also Appendix B. (Source: PEIMS, March 2009)

Ethnic Distribution: Students are reported as White, African American, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Native American. In the Profile section, both counts and percentages of the total number of students in each of these categories are shown. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008, Oct. 2007; The College Board; ACT Inc.; The International Baccalaureate Organization; and TEA Student Assessment Division)

FTE: Full-Time Equivalent.

Fund Balance Information (District Profile only): The amount of undesignated, unreserved fund balance that existed at the end of the 2007-08 school year is reported for each district.

The unreserved fund balance is not legally restricted and has two components: designated and undesignated. The designated component requires local board action to earmark the balance for bona fide purposes that will be fulfilled within a reasonable period of time. The undesignated component is available to finance monthly operating expenditures.

The amount reported in the AEIS report is the undesignated component, calculated as the difference between the total unreserved fund balance and the designated unreserved fund balance. This balance amount is expressed as a percent of the total budgeted expenditures (for the general fund) for the current year (2008-09) as specified in statute.

A district can have a negative, undesignated, unreserved fund balance when the district's reserved fund balance is greater than the district's total fund balance.

Note that while other finance items are now reported as actual, fund balance information is still expressed as a percent of total budgeted expenditures for the current year as required in statute. (Source: Financial Audit Report, Jan. 2009)

General Fund: This is a governmental fund used for operations of on-going organizations and activities. The amounts reported in this fund classification are reported separately from All Funds. General fund reporting includes fund codes 101-199 and 420. Fund 420, Foundation School Program and Other State Aid, is included in the general fund for charter schools only.

Note that all financial data shown by fund is actual data, not budgeted. Accordingly, the information is from the prior year (2007-08). See also Appendix B. (Source: PEIMS, March 2009)

Gold Performance Acknowledgment: The Gold Performance Acknowledgment (GPA) system acknowledges districts and campuses for high performance on indicators other than those used to determine accountability ratings. Charter operators and alternative education campuses (AECs) evaluated under alternative education accountability (AEA) procedures are also eligible to earn GPAs. Acknowledgment is awarded for high performance on:

  • Advanced Course/Dual Enrollment Completion
  • AP/IB Examination Results
  • Attendance Rate
  • College-Ready Graduates (new for 2009)
  • Commended Performance on TAKS: Reading/English Language Arts
  • Commended Performance on TAKS: Mathematics
  • Commended Performance on TAKS: Writing
  • Commended Performance on TAKS: Science
  • Commended Performance on TAKS: Social Studies
  • Comparable Improvement: Reading/ English Language Arts (campus only)*
  • Comparable Improvement: Mathematics (campus only)*
  • Recommended High School Program/Distinguished Achievement Program
  • SAT/ACT Results (College Admissions Tests)
  • TSI - Higher Education Readiness Component: English Language Arts
  • TSI - Higher Education Readiness Component: Mathematics

Comparable Improvement GPA is not applicable for campuses evaluated under AEA procedures.

Schools and districts receive one of three possible categories for each indicator. Acknowledged signifies they met the Gold Performance standard for the indicator; Does Not Qualify signifies that they were evaluated but did not meet the standard for the indicator or that the school or district was Academically Unacceptable or AEA: Academically Unacceptable; Not Applicable signifies there were no data to be evaluated for the indicator, usually due to the grades served by the district or campus. Schools or districts labeled Not Rated are not evaluated for Gold Performance Acknowledgment and are noted as Not Applicable.

Any GPAs earned by a district or campus are listed on the cover page of the AEIS reports, following the Accountability Rating. Refer to Chapters 5 and 13 in the 2009 Accountability Manual for detailed information on the standards for Gold Performance Acknowledgment.

See also Advanced Course/Dual Enrollment Completion, AP/IB Results, Attendance Rate, College-Ready Graduates, Comparable Improvement, RHSP/DAP Graduates, SAT/ACT Results, Texas Success Initiative, and TAKS.

Graduates (Class of 2008): In the Profile section, this is the total number of graduates (including summer graduates) for the 2007-08 school year, as reported by districts in the fall of 2008. The value includes 12th graders who graduated as well as graduates from other grades. Students in special education who graduate are included in the totals, and are also reported as a separate group. Special education graduates are students who graduated with a special education graduation type code or who received special education services their entire senior year (as determined by attendance data). Counts of students graduating under the recommended high school or distinguished achievement programs are also shown.

Students graduating with the class of 2008 could be coded with one of the following graduation types:

  • Minimum High School Program
  • Recommended High School Program
  • Distinguished Achievement Program
  • Special Education student completing an IEP

Counts of graduates are calculated slightly differently for three graduation-related indicators on the Performance section of the AEIS report:

  • SAT/ACT results do not indicate whether the examinee is served in special education; therefore, there is no way to know if a student taking the SAT or ACT is served in special education. However, because relatively fewer students served in special education take college admissions tests, only non-special education graduates are included in the denominator.
  • The RHSP/DAP (Recommended High School Program/Distinguished Achievement Program) indicator as well as the College-Ready Graduates indicator include all graduates, special education and non-special education, in both the numerator and denominator.

See also College-Ready Graduates, Completion Rate, and RHSP/DAP Graduates. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Instructional Expenditure Ratio (2007-08) (District Profile only): This measure, required by TEC 44.0071, indicates the percentage of the district's total actual expenditures for the 2007-08 fiscal year that were used to fund direct instructional activities. The instructional expenditure ratio is a district-level only measure, and is calculated as follows:

expenditures reported in function codes 11, 12, 13, 31 and object codes 6112 through 6499
divided by
expenditures reported in function codes 11-52, 92,and 95 and object codes 6112 through 6499

Contact the School Financial Audits Division at (512) 463-9095 for further details on this measure. See Appendix B for function and expenditure code labels. (Source: PEIMS, March 2009)

Instructional Staff Percent (District Profile only): This measure, required by TEC 44.0071, indicates the percentage of the district's full-time equivalent employees whose job function was to directly provide classroom instruction to students during the 2008-09 school year. The instructional staff percent is a district-level-only measure, and is calculated as follows:

total number of hours district staff reported under expenditure
object codes 6112, 6119, and 6129, and function codes 11, 12, 13, and 31
divided by
total number of hours worked by all district employees

Contact the School Financial Audits Division at (512) 463-9095 for further details about this measure. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

International Baccalaureate (IB): See AP/IB Results.

Leaver Record: In determining the status of prior year 7th through 12th grade students who are no longer enrolled at a Texas public school, TEA reviews attendance and enrollment records of all districts, the records of Texas graduates for the last several years, and GED certificate records. Districts, for their part, are required to submit a leaver code for all other students. This group of "leavers" includes students such as those who graduated, moved to another state or country, died, or dropped out. This information is sent to TEA in Submission 1 of the annual PEIMS data collection.

See Appendix I of the 2009 Accountability Manual for detailed information on coding leavers. See also Data Quality. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008; Secondary School Completion and Dropouts in Texas Public Schools, 2007-08, Texas Education Agency)

Limited English Proficient (LEP): These are students identified as limited English proficient by the Language Proficiency Assessment Committee (LPAC) according to criteria established in the Texas Administrative Code. Not all students identified as LEP receive bilingual or English as a second language instruction, although most do. In the Profile section of the reports, the percent of LEP students is calculated by dividing the number of LEP pupils by the total number of students in the school or district.

The LEP column in the Performance section shows the performance of students identified as LEP in the current year only; students who are no longer considered limited English proficient are not included in this column.

Beginning this year, a new section, Section III, was added to district, region and state reports. It shows the performance of current-year LEP students in great detail. See Bilingual Education/English as a Second Language Report and Appendix I. See also Campus Group and TAKS Participation. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Met Standard: See TAKS Met 2009 Standard.

Mobile: This measure, which is part of the TAKS Participation section of the AEIS, indicates the percent of student test results not included in the accountability system because the students move to a different school or district between the fall and spring.

Note that this measure is different from Mobility, which is defined below. See also Accountability Subset.

Mobility (Campus Profile only): A student is considered to be mobile if he or she has been in membership at the school for less than 83% of the school year (i.e., has missed six or more weeks at a particular school).

number of mobile students in 2007-08
divided by
number of students who were in membership at any time during the 2007-08 school year

This rate is calculated at the campus level. The mobility rate shown in the Profile section of campus reports under the "district" column is based on the count of mobile students identified at the campus level. That is, the district mobility rate reflects school-to-school mobility, within the same district or from outside the district. See also Campus Group. (Source: PEIMS, June 2008)

n/a: This indicates that data are not available or are not applicable.

Number of Students per Teacher: This shows the total number of students divided by the total teacher FTE count. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Paired Schools: For accountability purposes, schools that reported enrollment but did not have grades in which the state-mandated test was given (e.g. K-2 schools) are paired with schools with which they have a "feeder" relationship to determine accountability ratings. For example, assuming Travis Primary (K-2) feeds students into Navarro Elementary (3-5), the district would pair these two schools for accountability purposes. This means that the TAKS performance of Navarro Elementary is also used for rating Travis Primary and is reported on the AEIS report for Travis Primary.

PBM Special Education Monitoring Results Status: This label appears on the cover of AEIS reports for districts with a special education monitoring status. For a complete explanation of each label, see Appendix G.

Performance of Mobile Students (State Performance only): This additional report shows the aggregate state-level performance of students who were excluded from the district accountability subset due to mobility across districts between October and the time of testing. It is calculated for each TAKS subject as:

number of mobile students who passed each test
divided by
number of mobile students tested

These results are shown at http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/perfreport/aeis/2009/state.html. Scroll down to Performance of Mobile Students (past the TAKS indicators) and click on the link.

The report shows performance by subject summed across all grades tested. For purposes of comparison, Performance of Mobile Students is shown for 2009 and 2008.

This indicator is not available at the region, district, or campus level. See also Mobile. (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)

Professional Staff: This is a full-time equivalent (FTE) count of teachers, professional support staff, campus administrators, and, on the district profile, central administrators. Staff are grouped according to the PEIMS roles reported. Each type of professional staff is shown as a percentage of the total staff FTE. See also Appendix A. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Progress of Prior Year TAKS Failers (Sum of Grades 4 - 11): This indicator provides two measures that show the progress of students who failed the reading/ELA portion or the mathematics portion of the TAKS in the prior year.

(1) Percent of Failers Passing TAKS. Of the students who failed the TAKS in the prior year, this measure shows the percent that passed the corresponding assessment in the current year.

For 2009, the reported values for reading/ELA and mathematics are calculated as:

number of matched students who failed in 2008 but passed in 2009
divided by
number of matched students who failed in 2008

(2) Average TGI Growth. For students who failed the TAKS in the prior year, this measure shows their average growth (or change) between the prior year and current year, based on the Texas Growth Index (TGI).

For 2009, the reported values for reading/ELA and mathematics are calculated as:

sum of individual student TGI values for students who failed in 2008
divided by
total number of students with TGI values who failed in 2008

For 2009, students included in these measures are those who:

  • took the spring 2009 TAKS reading/ELA and/or mathematics tests in grades 4-11, including grade 11 TAKS (Accommodated) tests (progress is not calculated for grade 3 test takers since that is their first TAKS test);
  • are part of the 2009 Accountability Subset;
  • can be matched to the spring 2008 TAKS administration-anywhere in the state-to find their prior year score for reading/ELA and/or mathematics;
  • failed the 2008 TAKS administration of reading/ELA and/or mathematics.

Reports for both these measures by grade are available for each district and campus on the internet, within the AEIS report that appears on the Division of Performance Reporting's website. To view these reports, access the HTML version of a campus or district report from the AEIS site (http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/perfreport/aeis/2009/). The link below Progress of Prior Year TAKS Failers produces a separate report that provides the progress of prior year failers by grade. This indicator is also available in Section III of the reports. See also Texas Growth Index in this Glossary. For a more complete explanation of the Texas Growth Index, see Appendix E in the 2009 Accountability Manual. (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)

Recommended High School Program: See RHSP/DAP Graduates.

Retention Rates by Grade: The retention rate, reported in the Profile section, shows the percent of students in Texas public schools who enrolled in the fall of 2008-09 in the same grade as their grade in the last reported six-week period of the prior year (2007-08). It is calculated as follows:

total students not advanced to the next grade
divided by
total students advanced to the next grade + total students not advanced to the next grade

Special education retention rates are calculated and reported separately from the rates of non-special education students because local retention practices differ greatly between these two populations of students.

The AEIS report only shows retention rates for grades K-8. Retention rates for all grades can be found in Grade-Level Retention in Texas Public Schools, 2007-08, available from TEA. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008, June 2008)

RHSP/DAP Graduates: This indicator shows the percent of graduates who were reported as having satisfied the course requirements for the Texas State Board of Education Recommended High School Program or Distinguished Achievement Program. It is calculated as follows:

number of graduates reported with graduation codes for
Recommended High School Program or Distinguished Achievement Program
divided by
number of graduates

RHSP graduates are students with type codes of 15, 19, 22, 25 or 28; DAP graduates are students with type codes of 17, 20, 23, 26 or 29. See the PEIMS Data Standards for more information.

Schools and districts may qualify for Gold Performance Acknowledgment based on their RHSP/DAP rate. For a more detailed explanation of Gold Performance Acknowledgment, see the 2009 Accountability Manual. See also Graduates. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008, Oct. 2007)

SAT/ACT Results: These include the College Board's SAT Reasoning Test and ACT, Inc.'s ACT Assessment. Both testing companies annually provide the agency with testing information on the most recent test participation and performance of graduating seniors from all Texas public schools. Only one record is sent per student. If a student takes an ACT or SAT test more than once, the agency receives the record for the most recent examination taken.

Three values are calculated for this indicator:

(1) Tested. This shows the percent of graduates who took either college admissions test:

number of graduates who took either the SAT or the ACT
divided by
number of non-special education graduates

Note that "graduates" in the denominator of equation (1) does not include special education graduates; however, special education graduates who took either the SAT or ACT are included in the numerator. (See Graduates.)

(2) At/Above Criterion. This shows the percent of examinees who scored at or above the criterion score on either test (1110 on the SAT, or 24 on the ACT)

number of examinees who scored at or above criterion
divided by
number of examinees

(3) Average Score. This shows the average score for the SAT total and the average score for the ACT composite, calculated as follows:

total score (mathematics plus critical reading) for all students who took the SAT
divided by
number of students who took the SAT

and

total composite score for all students who took the ACT
divided by
number of students who took the ACT

Despite the addition of the writing portion of the SAT, the criterion score continues to be based on mathematics and critical reading only.

Schools and districts may qualify for Gold Performance Acknowledgment based on their SAT/ACT performance and participation. For a more detailed explanation of Gold Performance Acknowledgment, see the 2009 Accountability Manual. See also Criterion Score. (Sources: The College Board, Aug. 2008, Jan. 2008; ACT, Inc. (ACT) Oct. 2008, Oct. 2007; and PEIMS, Oct. 2008, Oct. 2007)

School Type: For purposes of creating the Campus Groups, schools are placed into one of four classifications based on the lowest and highest grades in which students are enrolled (i.e. in membership) at the school: elementary, middle (including junior high school), secondary, and both elementary/secondary (K-12). Generally speaking, elementary schools are PK-5 or PK-6, middle schools are 6-8, and secondary schools are 9-12. Schools whose grade spans do not exactly match these, are grouped with the school type most similar to their grade span.

Section III: Bilingual Education/English as a Second Language Report (district only): See Bilingual Education/English as a Second Language Report.

Special Education: This refers to the population served by programs for students with disabilities. Assessment decisions for students in special education programs are made by their Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) committee. The ARD committee is made up of the parent(s) or guardian, teacher, administrator, and other concerned parties. In the 2008-09 school year, a student in special education may have been administered the TAKS, TAKS (Accommodated), TAKS-Modified, or TAKS-Alternate. Results from TAKS (Accommodated) for certain grades and subjects are included in the TAKS performance shown on the AEIS reports. Campus and district-level performance results of the TAKS-Modified and TAKS-Alternate assessments are shown separately on the 2008-09 AEIS reports.

Other indicators that include the performance of students in special education are: advanced course/dual enrollment completion, attendance rate, annual dropout rates, college-ready graduates, completion rates, RHSP/DAP, TAKS exit-level cumulative pass rate, and the Texas Success Initiative. Information that would allow the separation of performance of special education students on college admissions tests and on Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate examinations is not available. Note that in the Profile section of the report, retention rates are shown separately for special education and non-special education students. See TAKS Special Education Assessments and TAKS Participation. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008, Oct. 2007, and TEA Student Assessment Division)

Special Education Compliance Status: See PBM Special Education Monitoring Results Status.

Staff Exclusions: These are counts of individuals who serve public school students, but are not included in the FTE totals for any of the other employee statistics. There are two types of these entries: individuals participating in a shared services arrangement and individuals on contract with the district to provide instructional services. Shared Services Arrangement (SSA) Staff work in schools located in districts other than their employing district, or their assigned organization (in PEIMS) shows a code of 751, indicating that they are employed by the fiscal agent of an SSA. Only the portion of a person's total FTE amount associated with the school in another district (or with the 751 organization code) is counted as SSA. SSA staff are grouped into three categories: Professional Staff (which includes teachers, administrators, and professional support); Educational Aides; and Auxiliary Staff. Note that SSA Auxiliary Staff are identified by the type of fund from which they are paid. Contracted Instructional Staff (District and Campus Profiles) refers to counts of instructors for whom the district has entered into a contractual agreement with some outside organization. Through the contract, the outside organization has committed to supplying instructional staff for the district. They are never employees of the reporting school district. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Standardized Local Tax Base (comptroller valuation) (District Profile only): The Comptroller conducts a study each year that uniformly evaluates the property values within school district boundaries. Locally assessed values may vary from the Comptroller's study values. The values certified by the Comptroller's Property Tax Division (Comptroller Valuation) are standardized in that they are deemed to be comparable across the state. Note that the values shown are final for tax year 2008. This is not the property value used for school funding calculations.

  • Value (after exemptions). This refers to the market value of all property in a district, minus certain exemptions and deductions. The value after exemptions reflects deductions for the state-mandated homestead exemptions, the disabled veterans' exemptions, the school tax ceiling for homeowners over age 65 or disabled, and other state-mandated exemptions.
  • Value per Pupil. This refers to school district property value, or Standardized Local Tax Base, divided by the total number of students. This per pupil figure is one definition of "wealth." Note that the values shown are final for tax year 2008. At the state level, the per pupil amount is created by dividing by the total number of students in districts with property value. Some districts do not have property value; their students are not included.
  • Value by Category. This shows aggregates of individual property tax categories expressed as a percent of the Comptroller's property value before the exemptions are applied. Thus, the sum of the category values will exceed the value used for per pupil calculations. Note that the values shown are final for tax year 2008.
    • Business -
      • real property: commercial and industrial;
      • real and tangible personal property: utilities; and
      • personal property: commercial and industrial.
    • Residential - real property: single-family, residential; multifamily, residential; and inventory.
    • Land - real property: vacant lots and tracts; acreage at market value, and farm and ranch improvements; acreage at productivity value.
    • Oil and Gas - real property: oil, gas, and other minerals.
    • Other - tangible personal property: other; and intangible personal property.

(Source: Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, July 2009)

Student Enrollment by Program: Students are identified as served in programs and/or courses for Special Education, Career and Technical Education, Bilingual/ESL Education, or Gifted and Talented Education. The percentages do not sum to 100, as a student may be enrolled in more than one of these programs. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Student Success Initiative (SSI): For the 2008-09 school year, students in 3rd grade needed to pass the reading portion of the TAKS in order to be promoted to the 4th grade; students in 5th grade needed to pass both the reading and mathematics portions of the TAKS in order to be promoted to 6th grade; and students in 8th grade needed to pass both the reading and mathematics portions of the TAKS in order to be promoted to 9th grade. Students were given three opportunities to pass each required test. In addition to promotion based on passing the test, some students were promoted based on the recommendation of their grade placement committee (GPC). The committee members needed to agree that the student was likely to perform on grade level after receiving accelerated instruction. The AEIS report shows four measures for each SSI grade and subject:

(1) Students Requiring Accelerated Instruction. For each subject and grade, this shows the percent of students who did not pass the first administration of the TAKS. Students who did not pass the test during the first administration must be provided accelerated instruction in preparation for the second administration:

number of eligible students who did not meet the standard in the first administration
divided by
number of eligible students in the first administration

The number of eligible students is calculated from the test answer documents and includes all students who were tested, students who should have been tested but were absent, and students who were not tested for other reasons. (The count of eligible students does not include students who have taken TAKS (Accommodated), TAKS-Modified, or TAKS-Alternate assessments or have a LEP exemption.) Students who were absent during the first administration or were not tested for other reasons are included in the counts of students requiring accelerated instruction.

(2) TAKS Cumulative Met Standard. For each subject and grade, this shows the cumulative (and unduplicated) percent of students who took and passed the tests in the first and second administrations combined:

number of students who passed the test in either of the first two administrations
divided by
cumulative number of students who took the test in either of the first two administrations

The values shown for this measure are the ones used in determining state accountability ratings. In most cases, this value does not match the TAKS performance shown by grade in the first few pages of this AEIS report. The "by grade" results are based on the first administration of each test only.

(3) TAKS Failers Promoted by Grade Placement Committee. This shows the percent of students who failed all attempts to pass but were promoted to the next grade by their GPC:

number of students promoted by their GPC
divided by
cumulative number of students who failed all administrations

(4) TAKS Met Standard (Failed in Previous Year). This presents two calculations for students who failed in 2008.

For those who were promoted, the first measure shows the percentage who passed the TAKS in 2009. Using grade 5 reading as an example, the calculation is as follows:

number of students promoted by their GPC who passed grade 6 TAKS reading in 2009
divided by
number of students who were promoted by their GPC and took grade 6 TAKS reading

For those who were retained, the second measure shows the percentage who passed the TAKS in 2009. Using grade 5 reading as an example, the calculation is as follows:

number of students retained who passed grade 5 TAKS reading in 2009
divided by
number of students retained and took grade 5 TAKS reading in 2009

The values include results from both the English and Spanish versions of the TAKS.

Note that the highest grade served in many elementary schools is grade 5. In these cases, only the performance of 5th graders who were retained will be reported. The performance of the students promoted to 6th grade will appear in the middle school report.

Some schools and districts may not have any prior year failers. In these cases, no information is printed for this measure. For grade 8, only one year is available for measures (3) and (4).

This indicator is also shown in Section III of the reports. For more information, see TEA's Student Assessment Division SSI site at http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/resources/ssi/index.html. (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)

Students by Grade: Percentages are calculated by dividing the number of students in each grade by the total number of students. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Students with Disciplinary Placements: Counts and percents of students placed in alternative education programs under Chapter 37 of the Texas Education Code (Discipline; Law and Order) are shown (for the 2007-08 school year) in the AEIS reports. Disciplinary placement counts are obtained from PEIMS records. Districts report the disciplinary actions taken toward students who are removed from the classroom for at least one day. Although students can have multiple removals throughout the year, this measure counts students only once and includes only those whose removal results in a placement in a disciplinary alternative education program or juvenile justice alternative education program. It is calculated as follows:

number of students with one or more disciplinary placements
divided by
number of students who were in attendance at any time during the school year

The following 19 reason codes on the PEIMS 425 record are included as disciplinary placements: 02, 03, 04, 07, 08, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 57, 59, 60, and 61. (Source: PEIMS, June 2008)

TAKS (Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills): The Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) is a comprehensive testing program for public school students in grades 3-11. The TAKS is designed to measure to what extent a student has learned, understood, and is able to apply the concepts and skills expected at each tested grade level.

The grades and subjects shown on the AEIS reports are:

  • Grade 3 - reading (first administration only) and mathematics
  • Grade 4 - reading, mathematics, and writing
  • Grade 5 - reading (first administration only), mathematics (first administration only), and science
  • Grade 6 - reading and mathematics
  • Grade 7 - reading, mathematics, and writing
  • Grade 8 - reading (first administration only), mathematics (first administration only), science, and social studies
  • Grade 9 - reading and mathematics
  • Grade 10 - English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies
  • Grade 11 - English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. These assessments are known as the exit-level tests; students are required to pass them in order to qualify for graduation from high school.

All TAKS tests in grades 3 through 6 are available in either English or Spanish. The AEIS reports show performance on these separately.

Each one of these tests is linked directly to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) curriculum. The TEKS is the state-mandated curriculum for Texas public school students. For more information on TEKS, see the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills website at http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=6148.

For 2008-09, the AEIS report shows the percent passing TAKS in several ways:

  • TAKS Met 2009 Standard, By Grade. The first indicator shown on the report is percent passing TAKS by grade for each subject area and for all tests taken. Please note the following:
    • Student Success Initiative. Only performance from the first administration of grade 3, 5, and 8 reading and grade 5 and 8 mathematics is shown by grade. Results that include the second administration can be found on the AEIS reports under Student Success Initiative: TAKS Cumulative Met Standard.
    • TAKS (Accommodated). Performance on the TAKS (Accommodated) is included in the following subjects and grades: English language arts for grade 11; mathematics for grade 11; science for grades 5, 8, 10, and 11; social studies for grades 8, 10, and 11. The symbol @ is shown whenever TAKS (Accommodated) performance is included.
    • Test Administrations Included. The results shown are for the first administration in the spring for grades 3-10. Students in grade 11 usually take the exit-level test for the first time in the spring semester of their junior year. However, under certain circumstances they may take the test for the first time in the previous October. The performance of these early testers is included in the results shown on the AEIS if they took and passed all four tests.
    • All Tests Taken. As described above, the number of tests given varies by grade. This means that the number of tests included in "All Tests Taken" varies by grade. The symbol @ is shown whenever TAKS (Accommodated) performance is included.
  • Sum of All Grades Tested. Three indicators are shown which sum TAKS results (by subject) across grades.
    • TAKS Met 2009 Standard (Sum of All Grades Tested, INCLUDES SELECTED TAKS (Accommodated)). This is the accountability indicator used for campuses and districts evaluated under standard procedures. It includes:
      • The cumulative passing rate from the first and second administrations for grade 3 reading and grade 5 and 8 reading and mathematics;
      • Performance on the TAKS (Accommodated) assessments for ELA (grade 11); mathematics (grade 11); science (grades 5, 8, 10, and 11); and social studies (grades 8, 10, and 11).
      • Performance on all TAKS Spanish versions;
      • This indicator is also shown in Section III of the reports.
    • TAKS Met 2009 Standard with TPM (Sum of All Grades Tested, INCLUDES SELECTED TAKS (Accommodated)). New for 2009, this measure includes students who met the TAKS passing standard and those who failed the standard but met the Texas Projection Measure. Only one year of data is shown. This indicator was evaluated as part of the 2009 state accountability rating system (standard procedures). See the 2009 Accountability Manual for details on its use. See also Texas Projection Measure for more information.
    • TAKS Commended Performance (Sum of All Grades Tested), INCLUDES SELECTED TAKS (Accommodated). This measure shows the percent of those students who met the higher "Commended" standard for each subject. See TAKS Commended for more information.
    • TAKS Met 2009 Standard (Sum of All Grades Tested, INCLUDES ALL TAKS (Accommodated)) (2010 Preview). This measure provides a preview of the 2010 TAKS accountability indicator for 2010, which will include:
      • performance on all TAKS (Accommodated) tests;
      • performance on TAKS (Accommodated) results for the second administration of grades 5 and 8;
      • performance on only the first administration results for grade 3; and
      • the use of the new vertical scale cut points for the student passing standards for selected grades and subjects in grades 3 - 8 reading and mathematics (English and Spanish). Note that although there will be no grade 6 Spanish TAKS in 2010, performance on grade 6 Spanish from 2009 was not removed from this indicator.
      • The prior year data shown (2008) will differ from the 2008 data for the 2010 Preview indicator reported on the 2007-08 AEIS reports. Results differ due to use of the vertical scale cut points, the exclusion of the second administration of grade 3, and the inclusion of second administration grade 5 and 8 TAKS (Accommodated) results.
    • TAKS Met 2009 Standard (Sum of All Grades Tested, INCLUDES ALL TAKS (Accommodated) and TAKS-Modified) (2011 Preview). This is the same as the 2010 preview except that it also includes TAKS-M results (including the second administration TAKS-M results for grades 5 and 8). The included TAKS-M results are for all tested grades and subjects. The administration of TAKS-M to all grades and subjects did not occur until 2009, so only one year of 2011 Preview can be shown.

Other important information:

  • Sum of all grades tested. This refers to the grades tested at the particular school. For example, the percent passing reading in an elementary school with a grade span of K-5 is calculated as follows:

number of students who passed the reading test in grades 3, 4, & 5
divided by
number of students who took the reading test in grades 3, 4, & 5

  • Rounding of Met Standard Percent. TAKS performance on the AEIS is rounded to whole numbers. For example, 49.877% is rounded to 50%; 79.4999% is rounded to 79%; and 89.5% is rounded to 90%.

  • Masking for Very High and Very Low Performance. Since 2004, more stringent masking rules have applied to results for the TAKS. In cases where performance is at or near 100%, the value is shown as ">99%." In cases where performance is at or near 0%, the value is shown as "<1%." It is necessary to mask data that potentially reveals the performance of every student in order to be in compliance with the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).
  • Accountability Subset. Only test takers who were enrolled on the last Friday in the previous October are included in the calculations shown on the AEIS reports. This is referred to as the "October subset" or the Accountability Subset. For the district, a student who moved into the district after October 31, 2008 would not have his performance included at the district level. At the campus level, a student who changed to a different campus within the same district after October 31, 2008 would not have his performance included at that school, though it would be included at the district level. See Accountability Subset for more information.
  • All Tests Taken. Although All Tests Taken is not a measure evaluated for accountability ratings purposes, it is shown on the AEIS report, both "by grade" and "summed across grades." This value shows the percent of students who passed every test they took. For example, a group of 100 students tested in reading and mathematics at the 3rd grade might have the following results: 90 students passed reading and 80 students passed mathematics. However, only 75 of those students passed BOTH reading and mathematics. For this reason, while the percent passing reading would be 90%, and the percent passing mathematics would be 80%, the percent passing All Tests Taken would be only 75%, not an average of 80% and 90%. All Tests Taken is always equal to or less than the percent of students who passed any of the individual subject areas. The more tests taken and considered for this measure, the more likely the All Tests Taken value will be lower than any of the individual subject areas.

See also Appendix F and TAKS Participation. (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)

TAKS (Accommodated): This is the same as the general TAKS assessment with certain format accommodations, such as larger font and fewer items per page. It also contains no embedded field-test items. It is administered in all grades and subjects; however, in the section of the AEIS Reports—TAKS Met 2009 Standard, by grade—the only TAKS (Accommodated) performance included is for: ELA (grade 11); mathematics (grade 11); science (grades 5, 8, 10, and 11); and social studies (grades 8, 10, and 11). A special symbol "@" indicate the grades that include TAKS (Accommodated) performance. The preview indicator, TAKS Met 2009 Standard (Sum of All Grades Tested, INCLUDES ALL TAKS (Accommodated)) (2010 Preview) is also available on the reports. TAKS (Accommodated) performance is not shown separately.

TAKS-Alternate (TAKS-Alt): This assessment is based on alternate academic standards and is designed for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Performance on TAKS-Alt is shown in TAKS-Alt Met 2009 Standard (Sum of All Grades Tested) (2011 Preview). It is a new indicator for the 2008-09 AEIS reports, and serves as a preview in anticipation of its use in determining accountability ratings in 2011.

The percent meeting the standard is calculated as:

number of TAKS-Alt tests passed (grades 3-11)
divided by
number of TAKS-Alt tests taken (grades 3-11)

Only one year (2009) is shown. Accountability subset rules apply. (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)

TAKS Commended: This measure refers to the highest performance level on the TAKS, a scale score of 2400, as set by the State Board of Education. Students who achieve Commended Performance have shown a thorough understanding of the knowledge and skills at their grade level. Schools and districts may qualify for Gold Performance Acknowledgment based on their TAKS Commended Performance on reading/ELA, writing, mathematics, social studies, and science. Note that this includes the performance on selected TAKS (Accommodated) tests, the same as those used in determining accountability ratings. For a more detailed explanation of Gold Performance Acknowledgment, see Chapter 5 of the 2009 Accountability Manual.

TAKS Exit-level Cumulative Pass Rate (District Performance only): The TAKS cumulative pass rate shows the percent of students who first took the TAKS exit-level test in spring 2008, and eventually passed all TAKS tests taken (in the same district) by spring 2009. (Students who failed the first time had four additional opportunities to retake test(s) before their graduation date.) This measure is intended to show the relative success of districts in their efforts to help all their students pass the exit-level TAKS, which is a requirement for graduation from Texas public schools. Note that for the class of 2009, results include performance on the TAKS (Accommodated) tests; however, for the prior year (class of 2008), performance on TAKS (Accommodated) tests is not included.

Test takers included in the TAKS Exit-level Cumulative Pass Rate for the class of 2009:

  • Any student who took the TAKS or TAKS (Accommodated) for the first time in spring 2008.
  • All special education students who took the TAKS or TAKS (Accommodated).
  • All above students, whether or not they were in the Accountability Subset in spring 2008.

Test takers NOT included in the TAKS Exit-level Cumulative Pass Rate:

  • Students who first took the exit-level test in District A, did not pass all sections and then moved to District B and retested. These students are taken out of both the numerator and denominator, whether or not they eventually passed all tests taken.
  • Students who moved out of state, left the country, or died before passing all tests taken. These students are in the denominator but not the numerator. They cannot be removed because they are not specifically identified in the data.
  • Students who dropped out of school before passing all tests taken are in the denominator but not the numerator.
  • Students who moved into the state after the spring of 2008 are not included, even if they took the TAKS and graduated with the class of 2009.

(Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)

TAKS Met 2009 Standard: This refers to the current TAKS passing standard—a scale score of 2100 on each tested subject and grade. For the actual number of test questions (raw score) required to pass each assessment, see Appendix F. The student passing standard is set by the State Board of Education.

TAKS-Modified (TAKS-M): This alternate assessment is based on modified academic achievement standards and is designed for students served by special education who meet certain participation requirements. This is a new indicator for 2009 for the campus, district, and region reports. TAKS-M results are available on the 2008-09 AEIS reports, summed across grades in TAKS-M Met 2009 Standard. Results are summed across grades and reported by subject for all five subjects and for All Tests Taken. The percent meeting the standard is calculated as:

number of students who passed TAKS-M [subject] test in grades 3-11
divided by
number of students who took the TAKS-M [subject] test in grades 3-11

Only one year (2009) is shown. Accountability subset rules apply.

See also the preview indicator, TAKS Met 2009 Standard (Sum of All Grades Tested, INCLUDES ALL TAKS (Accommodated) and TAKS-Modified) (2011 Preview). (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)

TAKS Participation: This indicator presents the percent of students tested and not tested on each state assessment, as well as the percent of students included and excluded in determining accountability ratings. For 2009, results from the TAKS and selected TAKS (Accommodated) tests were used in determining accountability ratings.

In 2009 there are three reasons for excluding test results from accountability:

  • Mobile. Students may take the TAKS or TAKS (Accommodated) but be excluded from the results reported because they were not enrolled in the same district or campus by the last Friday in the previous October (shown as Mobile).
  • Non-Acct Test. Performance on excluded TAKS (Accommodated) tests, TAKS-M, and TAKS-Alt is not used in determining accountability ratings.
  • Hurricane Ike. Performance of students displaced due to Hurricane Ike was removed from the accountability data and not used in determining ratings in 2009.

Other students are not tested. Reasons for not testing are as follows:

  • Absent. Students may have been absent during every test administration.
  • LEP Exempt. Students may have received a LEP (Limited English Proficient) exemption for every test and taken only the Texas English Language Proficiency Assessment System (TELPAS) test.
  • Other. Tests may not be scored due to illness during testing or other test administration irregularities.
  • Hurricane Ike. Students coded as displaced due to Hurricane Ike who were not tested are shown as a separate category.

The percentages of students participating and not participating in testing are based as much as possible on the total number of students enrolled at the time of testing. Districts are required to submit a TAKS answer document for every student enrolled in grades 3 through 11. The methodology used to create TAKS Participation eliminates, as much as possible, duplicate counts of students resulting from multiple answer documents. Appendix E provides a description for each component of TAKS Participation. (Source: TEA Student Assessment Division)

TAKS Progress Measure (AEA Campus and AEA Charter Operator Performance only): This measure is used in determining accountability ratings under alternative education accountability (AEA) procedures. The TAKS Progress Indicator is based on tests taken. It sums performance results across grades 3 through 12 and across all subjects. It is calculated as follows:

number of TAKS tests that meet the standard or meet TPM (grade 3-10) or meet TGI (grade 11)
and
number of TAKS exit-level retests that meet the standard
divided by
number of TAKS tests taken and
number of TAKS exit-level retests that meet the standard

This measure is only shown on the AEIS reports for campuses and charter operators evaluated under the AEA procedures in 2009. Prior year results are provided regardless of whether the campus or charter operator was evaluated under AEA procedures in the prior year.

  • AEA Campus. On reports for registered alternative education campuses, the value shown for the Campus Group column is a dash (-); the value for the District column is an asterisk (*) unless the campus is run by an AEA charter operator. The State column shows aggregates of the AEA campuses only.
  • AEA Charter Operator. On reports for AEA charter operators, the value shown for the State and Region columns show aggregates of the AEA campuses only.

For more information on this measure, see Chapter 10 in the 2009 Accountability Manual.

TAKS Special Education Assessments: For students receiving special education services, the ARD committee determines which TAKS assessment is appropriate for each student based on his/her individual needs. TAKS, the general assessment option that includes TAKS (Accommodated) for students receiving special education services, is administered to the majority of students in Texas. For students who cannot be appropriately assessed with TAKS and/or TAKS (Accommodated), the TAKS-M and TAKS-Alt are the alternate assessments available to those who meet specific participation requirements.

See TAKS (Accommodated), TAKS-Alt, and TAKS-M. For more information on these assessments, see the Student Assessment Division website, at http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index3.aspx?id=3534.

Teachers by Ethnicity and Sex: These are counts of teacher FTEs by the major ethnic groups and by sex. Counts are also expressed as a percent of the total teacher FTEs. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Teachers by Highest Degree Held (District Profile only): This shows the distribution of degrees attained by teachers in the district. The FTE counts of teachers with no degree, bachelor's, master's, and doctorate degrees are expressed as a percent of the total teacher FTEs. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Teachers by Program (population served): Teacher FTE counts are categorized by the type of student populations served. Regular education, special education, compensatory education, career and technical education, bilingual/ESL education, gifted and talented education, and miscellaneous other populations served are shown. Teacher FTE values are allocated across population types for teachers who serve multiple population types. Percentages are expressed as a percent of total teacher FTEs. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Teachers by Years of Experience (District Profile only): This is the FTE count of teachers with years of professional experience that fall into the ranges shown. Experience in these categories is the total years of experience for the individual, not years of experience in the reporting district or campus. Teacher counts within each range of experience are expressed as a percent of total teacher FTEs. A beginning teacher is a teacher reported with zero years of experience. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Texas Growth Index (TGI): The Texas Growth Index (TGI) is an estimate of a student's academic growth on the TAKS tests over two consecutive years (in consecutive grades). For the state accountability system, it is used to calculate Comparable Improvement in reading/ELA and mathematics for Gold Performance Acknowledgments, and to calculate the TAKS Progress Indicator under the alternative education accountability procedures. Average TGI is also one of the measures reported for prior year TAKS failers.

A TGI of zero means that the year-to-year change in average scale score is equal to the average predicted changes as calculated in the 2003 to 2004 base comparison years. A positive TGI means the group demonstrated growth that is larger than the expected growth for that group. A negative TGI indicates the group grew less than expected. Note that TAKS (Accommodated) tests have been included in determining TGI, specifically for 11th grade ELA and mathematics tests, where appropriate.

For a detailed explanation of how TGI is determined and used, refer to Appendix E of the 2009 Accountability Manual.

Texas Projection Measure: The Texas Projection Measure (TPM) is an estimate of whether a student is likely to pass the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) tests at a future grade. This measure is based on (1) a student's current performance on TAKS and (2) the TAKS scores from all students in the campus that a student attends. TPM was used for the first time in the 2009 accountability system for both standard and AEA procedures. See Chapters 3, 4 and 10 in the 2009 Accountability Manual for an explanation on how it was used to determine ratings.

For more information on the Texas Projection Measure methodology, see the Student Assessment Division's TPM Frequently Asked Questions at http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index3.aspx?id=3288&menu_id3=793.

Texas Success Initiative (TSI) - Higher Education Readiness Component: The Texas Success Initiative (TSI) is a program designed to improve student success in college. It requires students to be assessed in reading, writing and mathematics skills prior to enrolling in college, and to be advised based on the results of that assessment.

Students may be exempted from taking a test for the Texas Success Initiative if they have a high enough score on their exit-level TAKS tests for mathematics and English language arts, as set by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). The qualifying scores are scale scores of 2200 on their TAKS mathematics and English language arts with a written composition score of 3 or higher on the writing component. This indicator shows the percent of students who achieved this level of proficiency by subject (English language arts and mathematics) for 2009 and 2008. Results on the TSI - Higher Education Readiness Component were evaluated for GPA in the state accountability system.

Performance on exit-level TAKS (Accommodated) tests is included in determining TSI. This indicator is subject to accountability subset rules.

Schools and districts may qualify for Gold Performance Acknowledgment for performance on TSI. For a more detailed explanation of Gold Performance Acknowledgment, see Chapter 5 of the 2009 Accountability Manual. (Source: Division of Student Assessment)

Total Expenditures by Object (2007-08) (District Profile only): Total actual expenditures are grouped by object of expense. Total actual expenditures for groups of object categories are expressed as a percentage of total expenditures. The values in the Per Student column show actual expenditure object categories divided by the total number of 2007-08 students in membership. Note that the number shown is not the amount actually spent on each and every student, but rather a per-student average of the total. Object codes appear in parentheses.

  • Payroll Costs - gross salaries or wages and benefit costs for all employees (6100);
  • Other Operating Costs - services rendered to school districts by firms, individuals and other organizations; supplies and materials including fuel for vehicles; other reading materials (not including the cost of state-adopted textbooks); food service supplies; and other expenses necessary for the operation of the school district (6200-6400).
  • Debt Service - all expenditures for debt service including the retirement of debt and bond principal, and all interest expenses (6500); and
  • Capital Outlay - expenditures for fixed assets, such as land, buildings, and equipment (6600).

Note this item is reported as actual expenditures, not budgeted. Accordingly, the information is from the prior year (2007-08). See also Appendix B. (Source: PEIMS, March 2009)

Total Operating Expenditures by Function (2007-08): Actual total operating expenditures are grouped by function of expense. Actual operating expenditures for groups of function categories are expressed as a percent of actual total operating expenditures. The values in the Per Student column show actual operating expenditures by function divided by the total number of 2007-08 students in membership. Per student operating expenditures are shown for total operating expenditures and for various groupings of operating categories. Note that the number shown is not the amount actually spent on each and every student, but rather a per-student average of the total.

When comparing averages for school-level expenditures note that the state and district averages include all types of schools. For example, a high school's per student expenditure may not be comparable to the state average because the state value includes elementary and middle schools, which typically have lower per student expenditures than high schools. Other variables that may affect comparisons are the experience level of teachers and administrators, the types of instructional programs offered, and the student characteristics. Function codes appear in parentheses.

  • Instruction - all activities dealing directly with the interaction between teachers and students, including instruction aided with computers (11); and, expenditures to provide resources for Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Programs (95).
  • Instructional-Related Services - expenditures for educational resources and media, such as resource centers and libraries (12); and, curriculum development and instructional staff development (13).
  • Instructional Leadership - managing, directing, supervising, and providing leadership for staff who provide instructional services (21).
  • School Leadership - directing and managing a school (23).
  • Support Services - Student - guidance, counseling, and evaluation services (31); social work services (32); and, health services (33).
  • Student Transportation (District Profile only) - transporting students to and from school (34).
  • Food Services - food service operation, including cost of food and labor (35).
  • Cocurricular Activities - school-sponsored activities during or after the school day that are not essential to the delivery of instructional services (36).
  • Central Administration (District Profile only) - managing or governing the school district as an overall entity (41); costs associated with the purchase or sale of attendance credits either from the state or from other school district(s) (92); and for Charter Schools only, fund raising (81).
  • Plant Maintenance and Operations - keeping the physical plant and grounds in effective working condition (51).
  • Security and Monitoring Services - keeping student and staff surroundings safe (52).
  • Data Processing Services - data processing services, whether in-house or contracted (53).
  • Other Campus Costs - (Campus Profile only) combines functions 35, 36, 51, 52, 53 above.

Note this item is reported as actual expenditures, not budgeted. Accordingly, the information is from the prior year (2007-08). See also Appendix B. (Source: PEIMS, March 2009)

Total Operating Expenditures by Program (2007-08): Actual total operating expenditures are grouped by program of expense. Actual operating expenditures for groups of program categories are expressed as a percent of actual total operating expenditures. The values in the Per Student column show actual total operating expenditures divided by the total number of 2007-08 students in membership. Per student operating expenditures are shown for total operating expenditures by program for various groupings of operating categories. Note that the number shown is not the amount actually spent on each and every student; it is a per-student average of the total. Program codes appear in parentheses. The sum of operating expenditures by program area is less than total operating expenditures by function because a significant portion of expenditures have no program area designated and are reported as "99" meaning "undistributed." These are not included in any of the program categories shown or in the total operating expenditure amount by program. Also, functions included differ between the two breakdowns (by program versus by function).

  • Regular - costs to provide the basic services for education/instruction to students not in special education (11).
  • Gifted & Talented Education - the cost to assess students for program placement and provide instructional services beyond the basic educational program, designed to meet the needs of students in gifted and talented programs (21).
  • Career & Technical Education - the cost to evaluate, place and provide educational and/or other services to prepare students for gainful employment, advanced technical training or homemaking. This may include apprenticeship and job training activities (22).
  • Special Education - services to students with disabilities. The costs incurred to evaluate, place and provide educational and/or other services to students who have Individual Educational Plans (IEP) approved by Admission, Review and Dismissal (ARD) committees. These plans are based on students' abilities and/or learning needs (23).
  • Accelerated Education - the cost to use instructional strategies in accordance with campus/district improvement plans to provide services in addition to those allocated for basic services for instruction, thereby increasing the amount and quality of instructional time for students at risk of dropping out of school and the costs incurred to provide services in support of Title I, Part A schoolwide campuses with at least 40% educationally disadvantaged students. (24, 30).
  • Bilingual/ESL Education - cost to evaluate, place and provide educational and/or other services that are intended to make the students proficient in the English language, primary language literacy, composition and academic language related to required courses (25).
  • Other - costs incurred to provide services to students who are separated from the regular classroom to a nondisciplinary or disciplinary alternative education program (26, 28, 29).
  • Athletics/Related Activities (District Profile only) - costs incurred to provide for participation in competitive athletic activities, including coaching costs as well as for sponsors of drill team, cheerleaders, pep squad or other organized activity to support athletics excluding band (91).

Note this item is reported as actual operating expenditures by program, not budgeted. Accordingly, the information is from the prior year (2007-08). See Appendix B for details. (Source: PEIMS, March 2009)

Total Revenues by Source (2007-08) (District Profile only): Actual total revenues are grouped by revenue source. Actual revenues for groups of object categories are expressed as a percent of total revenue. The values in the Per Student column show actual total revenues divided by the total number of students in membership during the 2007-08 school year. Per-student revenues are shown for total revenues by source for various groupings of revenue categories. Note that the number shown is not the amount actually received for each and every student, but rather a per-student average of the total.

The amounts appearing as revenue in any of the categories shown are the amounts that were reported by districts for the general fund and all funds. Object codes appear in parentheses.

  • Local Tax - district income from local real and personal property taxes (objects 5710-5719, less functions 91 & 96 expenditures);
  • Other Local and Intermediate - revenue for services to other districts, tuition and fees from students, transfers from within the state, revenue from cocurricular and enterprising activities, revenues from intermediate sources (county), and all other local sources (objects 5720-5769);
  • State - per capita and foundation program entitlements, revenue from other state-funded programs, and revenue from other state agencies. State revenue also includes Teacher Retirement System benefits paid by the State of Texas on behalf of employees in the district (object 5800 series); and
  • Federal - revenue received by the district directly from the federal government or distributed by the TEA or other state entities for programs such as career and technical education, programs for educationally disadvantaged children (Education Consolidation and Improvement Act, and Elementary and Secondary Education Act), food service programs, and other federal programs (object 5900 series).

Note this item is reported as actual revenues, not budgeted. Accordingly, the information is from the prior year (2007-08). See also Appendix B. (Source: PEIMS, March 2009)

Total Staff: Total staff includes professional staff (teachers, professional support, administrators), educational aides, and (on the district profile) auxiliary staff. Minority staff is the sum of the FTE counts for all non-white staff groups (African American, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Native American). This FTE count is expressed as a percent of the total staff FTE. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

Total Students: This is the total number of public school students who were reported in membership on October 31, 2008, at any grade, from early childhood education through grade 12. Membership is a slightly different number from enrollment, because it does not include those students who are served in the district for less than two hours per day. For example, the count of Total Students excludes students who attend a nonpublic school but receive some services, such as speech therapy-for less than two hours per day-from their local public school district. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008)

TSI: See Texas Success Initiative.

Turnover Rate for Teachers (District Profile only): This percent shows the total FTE count of teachers from the fall of 2007-08 who were subsequently not employed in the district in the fall of 2008-09, divided by the total teacher FTE count for the fall of 2007-08. Social security numbers for teachers employed in the district in the fall of 2007-08 were checked to verify their employment status in the same district in the fall of 2008-09. Staff who remained employed in the district but not as teachers were also counted toward teacher turnover. (Source: PEIMS, Oct. 2008, Oct. 2007)

Value by Category: See Standardized Local Tax Base (comptroller valuation).


Who to Call

Information about the calculation of all Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) data elements is provided in this Glossary. Information on the calculation of state accountability ratings is available in the 2009 Accountability Manual. If, after reading these documents, you have questions about the calculation of AEIS indicators or accountability ratings, contact Performance Reporting at (512) 463-9704.

Questions related to programs and policies for the following subjects should be directed to the contacts listed below. All telephone numbers are in the (512) area code unless otherwise noted.

Subject

Contact

Number

Accountability Ratings (methodology)

Performance Reporting

463-9704

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)

Performance Reporting

463-9704

Advanced Courses

Curriculum

463-9581

Advanced Placement (AP) Programs

Curriculum

463-9581

Charter Schools

Charter Schools

463-9575

College Admissions Tests:

 

 

  SAT

College Board, Southwestern Regional Office

891-8400

  ACT

ACT Regional Office

345-1949

Copies of AEIS reports

 

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/perfreport

DAEP (Disciplinary Alternative Education Program)

Chapter 37, TEC – Safe Schools

463-3070

Distinguished Achievement Program

Curriculum

463-9581

Dropout and Completion

Accountability Research

475-3523

Gold Performance Acknowledgment

Performance Reporting

463-9704

General Inquiry

School Governance and General Inquiries

475-3697

JJAEP (Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program)

Chapter 37, TEC – Safe Schools

463-3070

Limited English Proficient Students

 

 

  Testing Issues

Student Assessment

463-9536

  Other Issues

Curriculum (Bilingual Education Program Unit)

475-9581

No Child Left Behind Act

NCLB Program Coordination

463-9374

PBM Special Education Monitoring Results Status

Program Monitoring and Interventions

463-5226

PEIMS

PEIMS HelpLine

936-7346

Recommended High School Program

Curriculum

463-9581

Retention Policy

Curriculum

463-9581

School Finance

School Financial Audits

463-9095

School Report Card

Performance Reporting

463-9704

Special Education

 

 

  Testing Issues

Student Assessment

463-9536

  Other Issues

Special Education

463-9414

Statutory (Legal) Issues

Legal Services

463-9720

TAKS (all assessments)

Student Assessment

463-9536

TAKS Testing Contractor

Pearson Educational Measurement

(800) 252-9186

TAT (Technical Assistance Team)

 

 

  Methodology for List

  Performance Reporting

463-9704

Implementation of Team

Program Monitoring and Interventions

463-5226

TELPAS

Student Assessment

463-9536

Texas Projection Measure

Student Assessment

463-9536

Texas Success Initiative (TSI)

Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board

427-6100




Graphic explaining Performance Section page 1



Graphic explaining Performance Section page 2



Graphic explaining Performance Section page 3


Appendix A

PEIMS Role Identifications (In Alphabetical Order by Label)

Central Administrators

    027

Superintendent/CAO/CEO/President

Campus Administrators

    003

Assistant Principal

Either Central Or Campus Administrators*

    004

Assistant/Associate/Deputy Superintendent

    012

Instructional Officer

    020

Principal

    028

Teacher Supervisor

    040

Athletic Director

    043

Business Manager

    044

Tax Assessor and/or Collector

    045

Director - Personnel/Human Resources

    055

Registrar

    061

Asst/Assoc/Deputy Exec Director

    062

Component/Department Director

    063

Coordinator/Manager/Supervisor

Professional Support Staff

    002

Art Therapist

    005

Psychological Associate

    006

Audiologist

    007

Corrective Therapist

    008

Counselor

    011

Educational Diagnostician

    013

Librarian

    015

Music Therapist

    016

Occupational Therapist

    017

Certified Orientation & Mobility Specialist

    018

Physical Therapist

    019

Physician

    021

Recreational Therapist

    022

School Nurse

    023

LSSP/Psychologist

    024

Social Worker

    026

Speech Therapist/Speech-Lang Pathologist

    030

Visiting Teacher

    032

Work-Based Learning Site Coordinator

    041

Teacher Facilitator

    042

Teacher Appraiser

    054

Department Head

    056

Athletic Trainer

    058

Other Campus Professional Personnel

    064

Specialist/Consultant

    065

Field Service Agent

    079

Other ESC Professional Personnel

    080

Other Non-Campus Professional Personnel

Teachers

    025

Special Duty Teacher

    029

Teacher

    047

Substitute Teacher

Educational Aides

    033

Educational Aide

    036

Certified Interpreter

    037

Non-Certified Interpreter

Auxiliary Staff

    Employment record, but no responsibility records.

* Administrators reported with these roles are categorized as central office or campus, depending on the organization ID reported for them.





Appendix B

Financial Accounting Codes for Revenue and Expenditure Items
 (In Alphabetical Order by Label)

Label

Funds*

Function(s)

Object(s) +++

Program(s)

Actual Expenditure Information

  By Function

    Community Services

General and All

61

6100-6400

All

    Total Operating  Expenditures

General and All

Sum of Detail Below

6100-6400

All

      Instruction**

General and All

11,95

6100-6400

All

      Instructional – Related Services**

General and All

12,13

6100-6400

All

      Instructional Leadership**

General and All

21

6100-6400

All

      School Leadership**

General and All

23

6100-6400

All

      Support Services – Student**

General and All

31,32,33

6100-6400

All

      Student Transportation

General and All

34

6100-6400

All

      Food Services

General and All

35

6100-6400

All

      Cocurricular Activities

General and All

36

6100-6400

All

      Central Administration

General and All

41,92 (or 81/Chrtr Schools)

6100-6400

All

      Plant Maintenance & Operations

General and All

51

6100-6400

All

      Security and Monitoring Services

General and All

52

6100-6400

All

      Data Processing Services

General and All

53

6100-6400

All

      Other Campus Costs***

General and All

35,36,51-53

6100-6400

All

  By Object

      Total Expenditures

General and All

All§

All 6000s

All

      Payroll Costs

General and All

All§

6100

All

      Other Operating Costs

General and All

All§

6200-6400

All

      Debt Service

General and All

All§

6500

All

      Capital Outlay

General and All

All§

6600

All

Actual Program Expenditure Information

  By Program

    Total Operating Expenditures

General and All

Sum of Detail Below

6100-6400

Sum of Detail Below

      Regular Education**

General and All

11-13,21,23,31-36,51,52, 91+, 92,95,96+,99 ****

6100-6400

11

      Special Education**

General and All

11-13,21,23,31-36,51,52, 91+, 92,95,96+,99 ****

6100-6400

23

      Accelerated Education**

General and All

11-13,21,23,31-36,51,52, 91+, 92,95,96+,99 ****

6100-6400

24, 30

      Career & Technical Education**

General and All

11-13,21,23,31-36,51,52, 91+, 92,95,96+,99 ****

6100-6400

22

      Bilingual/ESL Education**

General and All

11-13,21,23,31-36,51,52, 91+, 92,95,96+,99 ****

6100-6400

25

      Gifted & Talented Education**

General and All

11-13,21,23,31-36,51,52, 91+, 92,95,96+,99 ****

6100-6400

21

      Athletics/Related Activities§§

General and All

11-13,21,23,31-36,51,52, 91+, 92,95,96+,99 ****

6100-6400

91

      Other

General and All

11-13,21,23,31-36,51,52, 91+, 92,95,96+,99 ****

6100-6400

26, 28, 29

Actual Revenue Information

  By Source

    Total  Revenues

General and All

n/a

5000s

n/a

      Local Tax

General and All

n/a

5710-5719 (less function 91& 96 expenditures)

n/a

      Other Local & Intermediate

General and All

n/a

5720-5769

n/a

      State

General and All

n/a

5800

n/a

      Federal

General and All

n/a

5900

n/a

Equity Transfers++

General and All

91,96

All 6000s

All

*   Funds – The general fund includes fund codes 101-199. Fund code 420 is also included in the general fund for charter schools only. All funds include the general fund plus fund codes 200/300/400 series, 599, 601, 699, and 701.
**   Indicates the line item appears on the Campus Profile as well as District Profile. All line items not marked appear only on the District Profile.
***   Indicates the line item appears on the Campus Profile only.
****   At the campus level, only functions 11-13, 21, 23, 31-33, and 95 are included in expenditures by program area.
§      Excludes Intergovernmental Charges (function 90 series) except functions 92 & 95.
§§      Athletics/Related Activities is not included at the campus level.
+  Functions 91 and 96 represent tuition transfers for grades not offered, not “Equity Transfers.”
++  Functions 91 and 96 represent the expenditure amount reported for the cost of reducing property wealth to the required equalized wealth level and payments to charter schools, respectively.
+++ The 6400 object codes include: 6629, 6631, 6639, 6649, and 6659 which is only applicable to charter schools excluding open enrollment college and university charters. Note that these object codes are not included in the 6600 code series.

See the Financial Resource Guide for explanations of the fund, function, object, and program codes.



Appendix C

Advanced Academic Courses

2007-08 Academic Excellence Indicator System

English Language Arts

A3220100

English Language and Composition

A3220200

English Literature and Composition

A3220300

International English Language

I3220300

English III

I3220400

English IV

03221100

Research/Technical Writing

03221200

Creative/Imaginative Writing

03221500

Literary Genres

03221600

Humanities

03221800

Independent Study in English

03231000

Independent Study in Journalism

03231902

Advanced Broadcast Journalism III

03240400

Oral Interpretation III

03240800

Debate III

03241100

Public Speaking III

03241200

Independent Study in Speech

Mathematics

A3100101

Calculus AB

A3100102

Calculus BC

A3100200

AP Statistics

I3100100

Mathematical Studies Standard

I3100200

Mathematical Standard Level

I3100300

Mathematics Higher Level

I3100400

Further Mathematics Standard

03101100

Pre-Calculus

03102500

Independent Study in Mathematics (1st time)

03102501

Independent Study in Mathematics (2nd time)

Computer Science

A3580100

Computer Science I

A3580200

Computer Science II

I3580200

Computer Science I

I3580300

Computer Science II

I3580400

Informational Technology in a Global Society

03580200

Computer Science I

03580300

Computer Science II

Science

A3010200

Biology

A3020000

Environmental Science

A3040000

Chemistry

A3050001

Physics B

A3050002

Physics C

I3010200

Biology

I3010201

Biology II

I3020000

Environmental Systems

I3040001

Chemistry I

I3040002

Chemistry II

I3050001

Physics I

I3050002

Physics II

Social Studies/History

A3310100

Microeconomics

A3310200

Macroeconomics

A3330100

United States Government and Politics

A3330200

Comparative Government and Politics

A3340100

United States History

A3340200

European History

A3350100

Psychology

A3360100

Human Geography

A3370100

World History

I3301100

History, Standard Level

I3301200

History: Africa, Higher Level

I3301300

History: Americas, Higher Level

I3301400

History: East and Southeast Asia, Higher Level

I3301500

History: Europe, Higher Level

I3302100

Geography, Standard Level

I3302200

Geography, Higher Level

I3303100

Economics, Standard Level

I3303200

Economics, Higher Level

I3303300

Business and Management I (IBBMT1)

I3303400

Business and Management II (IBBMT2)

I3304100

Psychology, Standard Level

I3304200

Psychology, Higher Level

I3366010

Philosophy

I3000100

Theory of Knowledge

03310301

Economics Advanced Studies

03380001

Social Studies Advanced Studies

Fine Arts

A3150200

Music Theory

A3500100

History Of Art

A3500300

Art/Drawing 

A3500400

Art/Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio

A3500500

Art/Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio

I3250200

Music SL

I3250300

Music HL

I3600100

Art/Design HL

I3600200

Art/Design SL-A

I3600300

Art/Design SL-B

I3750200

Theatre Arts SL

I3750300

Theatre Arts HL

M1170158

Dance Technology I

M1170159

Dance Technology II

M1170160

Dance Choreography I

M1170161

Dance Choreography II

M1170162

Dance Choreography III

03150400

Music IV Band

03150800

Music IV Orchestra

03151200

Music IV Choir

03151600

Music IV Jazz Band

03152000

Music IV Instrumental Ensemble

03152400

Music IV Vocal Ensemble

03250400

Theatre Arts IV

03251000

Theatre Production IV

03251200

Technical Theatre IV

03502300

Art IV Drawing

03502400

Art IV Painting

03502500

Art IV Printmaking

03502600

Art IV Fibers

03502700

Art IV Ceramics

03502800

Art IV Sculpture

03502900

Art IV Jewelry

03503100

Art IV Photography

03503200

Art IV Graphic Design

03503500

Art IV Electronic Media

03830400

Dance IV

Advanced Languages (Modern or Classical)

A3120400

Japanese IV

A3400400

Italian IV

A3410100

French IV Language

A3410200

French V Literature

A3420100

German IV Language

A3430100

Latin IV (Vergil)

A3430200

Latin V (Latin Literature)

A3440100

Spanish IV Language

A3440200

Spanish V Literature

A3450400

Russian IV

A3490400

Chinese IV

I3120400

Japanese IV

I3120500

Japanese V

I3410400

French IV

I3410500

French V

I3420400

German IV

I3420500

German V

I3430400

Latin IV

I3430500

Latin V

I3440400

Spanish IV

I3440500

Spanish V

I3450400

Russian IV

I3450500

Russian V

I3480400

Hebrew IV

I3480500

Hebrew V

I3490400

Chinese IV

I3490500

Chinese V

I3520400

Hindi IV

I3520500

Hindi V

I3996000

Other Foreign Language IV

I3996100

Other Foreign Language V

03110400

Arabic IV

03110500

Arabic V

03110600

Arabic VI

03110700

Arabic VII

03120400

Japanese IV

03120500

Japanese V

03120600

Japanese VI

03120700

Japanese VII

03400400

Italian IV

03400500

Italian V

03400600

Italian VI

03400700

Italian VII

03410400

French IV

03410500

French V

03410600

French VI

03410700

French VII

03420400

German IV

03420500

German V

03420600

German VI

03420700

German VII

03430400

Latin IV

03430500

Latin V

03430600

Latin VI

03430700

Latin VII

03440400

Spanish IV

03440440

Spanish IV For Span Speakers

03440500

Spanish V

03440550

Spanish V For Span Speakers

03440600

Spanish VI

03440660

Spanish VI For Span Speakers

03440700

Spanish VII

03440770

Spanish VII For Span Speakers

03450400

Russian IV

03450500

Russian V

03450600

Russian VI

03450700

Russian VII

03460400

Czech IV

03460500

Czech V

03460600

Czech VI

03460700

Czech VII

03470400

Portuguese IV

03470500

Portuguese V

03470600

Portuguese VI

03470700

Portuguese VII

03480400

Hebrew IV

03480500

Hebrew V

03480600

Hebrew VI

03480700

Hebrew VII

03490400

Chinese IV

03490500

Chinese V

03490600

Chinese VI

03490700

Chinese VII

03510400

Vietnamese IV

03510500

Vietnamese V

03510600

Vietnamese VI

03510700

Vietnamese VII

03520400

Hindi IV

03520500

Hindi V

03520600

Hindi VI

03520700

Hindi VII

03980400

American Sign Language IV

03980500

American Sign Language V

03980600

American Sign Language VI

03980700

American Sign Language VII

03996000

Other Foreign Language IV

03996100

Other Foreign Language V

03996200

Other Foreign Language VI

03996300

Other Foreign Language VII

  • All courses shown were for the 2006-07 school year.
  • An “A” prefix indicates a College Board Advanced Placement course.
  • An “I” prefix indicates an International Baccalaureate course.
  • Dual Enrollment courses are not specifically shown on this list.


Appendix D

Graphic explaining Campus Comparison Group


Graphic explaining Comparable Improvement



Appendix E

Graphic explaining TAKS Participation



Appendix F

TAKS Raw Scores for Spring 2009 Tests

Spring 2009 TAKS Reading (English) Performance Standards

 

Standard

Total Points Possible

Number Correct

Percent
Correct

Grade 31

Met Standard

36

23

64%

 

Commended Performance

33

92%

Grade 4

Met Standard

40

28

70%

 

Commended Performance

38

95%

Grade 51

Met Standard

42

28

67%

 

Commended Performance

39

93%

Grade 6

Met Standard

42

27

64%

 

Commended Performance

38

90%

Grade 7

Met Standard

48

34

71%

 

Commended Performance

45

94%

Grade 81

Met Standard

48

33

69%

 

Commended Performance

45

94%

Grade 9

Met Standard

42

28

67%

 

Commended Performance

37

88%

Spring 2009 TAKS Reading (Spanish) Performance Standards

 

Standard

Total Points Possible

Number Correct

Percent
Correct

Grade 31

Met Standard

36

23

64%

 

Commended Performance

33

92%

Grade 4

Met Standard

40

25

63%

 

Commended Performance

36

90%

Grade 51

Met Standard

42

27

64%

 

Commended Performance

37

88%

Grade 6

Met Standard

42

25

60%

 

Commended Performance

36

86%

Spring 2009 TAKS English Language Arts Performance Standards2

 

Standard

Total Points Possible

Number Correct

Percent
Correct

Grade 10

Met Standard

73

48

66%

 

Commended Performance

64

88%

Grade 11

Met Standard

73

44

60%

 

Commended Performance

63

86%

Spring 2009 TAKS Mathematics (English) Performance Standards

 

Standard

Total Points Possible

Number Correct

Percent
Correct

Grade 3

Met Standard

40

27

68%

 

Commended Performance

37

93%

Grade 4

Met Standard

42

28

67%

 

Commended Performance

39

93%

Grade 51

Met Standard

44

30

68%

 

Commended Performance

40

91%

Grade 6

Met Standard

46

29

63%

 

Commended Performance

41

89%

Grade 7

Met Standard

48

28

58%

 

Commended Performance

44

92%

Grade 81

Met Standard

50

30

60%

 

Commended Performance

45

90%

Grade 9

Met Standard

52

31

60%

 

Commended Performance

45

87%

Grade 10

Met Standard

56

33

59%

 

Commended Performance

51

91%

Grade 11

Met Standard

60

34

57%

 

Commended Performance

53

88%

Spring 2009 TAKS Mathematics (Spanish) Performance Standards

 

Standard

Total Points Possible

Number Correct

Percent
Correct

Grade 3

Met Standard

40

27

68%

 

Commended Performance

37

93%

Grade 4

Met Standard

42

27

64%

 

Commended Performance

37

88%

Grade 51

Met Standard

44

30

68%

 

Commended Performance

39

89%

Grade 6

Met Standard

46

29

63%

 

Commended Performance

40

87%

Spring 2009 TAKS Writing (Spanish) Performance Standards3

 

Standard

Total Points Possible

Number Correct

Percent
Correct

Grade 4

Met Standard

32

17

53%

 

Commended Performance

27

84%

Spring 2009 TAKS Writing (English) Performance Standards3

 

Standard

Total Points Possible

Number Correct

Percent
Correct

Grade 4

Met Standard

32

17

53%

 

Commended Performance

28

88%

Grade 7

Met Standard

44

25

57%

 

Commended Performance

39

89%

Spring 2009 TAKS Social Studies Performance Standards

 

Standard

Total Points Possible

Number Correct

Percent
Correct

Grade 8

Met Standard

48

25

52%

 

Commended Performance

42

88%

Grade 10

Met Standard

50

29

58%

 

Commended Performance

44

88%

Grade 11

Met Standard

55

27

49%

 

Commended Performance

49

89%

Spring 2009 TAKS Science (English) Performance Standards

 

Standard

Total Points Possible

Number Correct

Percent
Correct

Grade 5

Met Standard

40

30

75%

 

Commended Performance

37

93%

Grade 8

Met Standard

50

33

66%

Commended Performance

44

88%

Grade 10

Met Standard

55

35

64%

 

Commended Performance

50

91%

Grade 11

Met Standard

55

30

55%

 

Commended Performance

49

89%

Spring 2009 TAKS Science (Spanish) Performance Standards

 

Standard

Total Points Possible

Number Correct

Percent
Correct

Grade 5

Met Standard

40

30

75%

 

Commended Performance

37

93%

Footnotes:

  1. First administration TAKS standards.
  2. An essay rating of 2 or higher is required for Met Standard on the English Language Arts tests.
  3. An essay rating of 2 or higher is required for Met Standard and an essay rating of 3 or higher is required for Commended Performance on the grades 4 and 7 writing tests.

The numbers and percents shown on this table are based on the first administration of the spring 2009 TAKS test. It should not be used to anticipate the exact number and percent correct required to achieve Met Standard or Commended Performance levels on future test administrations. This is because the numbers may differ slightly from those shown above to ensure that equivalent standards are maintained for each TAKS administration.



Appendix G

PBM Special Education Monitoring Results Status

The system of special education monitoring is aligned with other PBM activities through the use of graduated interventions based on indicators of school district and charter school performance and program effectiveness. These indicators are part of the Performance-Based Monitoring Analysis System (PBMAS). Overall results on the PBMAS indicators, as well as instances of low performance on individual PBMAS indicators, are taken into account in determining required levels of intervention. The individual indicators address issues related to student participation in, and performance on, assessment instruments; graduation and dropout rates; over-identification of students for special education programs; disproportionate student representation based on race or ethnicity or on limited English proficiency; and disciplinary actions. District and charter special education data are reviewed regularly as are complaints filed with TEA about special education services. For further information or questions about this status, please contact the Program Monitoring and Interventions Division at (512) 463-5226. The "as of date" for the statuses reported in the 2008-2009 AEIS report is October 1, 2009.

The definitions of each program status category are:

  • Local Interventions Implemented. The LEA completed a local review process by a specified date as required in Stage 1A Intervention and retained materials and templates at the LEA.
  • Completed: Routine Follow-up. The LEA data and documentation met TEA requirements for completion of process. TEA will monitor implementation of the CIP.
  • Completed: Noncompliance Follow-up. The LEA data and documentation met TEA requirements for completion of process. TEA will monitor implementation of the CIP and systemic correction of areas of noncompliance identified by the review.
  • Pending CIP Resubmission. TEA review determined that one or more areas of the CIP did not meet minimum TEA requirements, and revision was necessary.
  • Pending TEA On-Site Action. TEA review determined that: appropriate implementation of TEA monitoring processes, including submission of accurate data, appropriate implementation of intervention requirements, and/or appropriate implementation of the CIP, could not be verified through LEA documentation; imminent program performance and/or effectiveness concerns exist; and/or ongoing noncompliance for more than one year is identified, resulting in an on-site review to determine additional TEA intervention.
  • TEA On-Site Action Completed: Routine Follow-up. TEA has completed an on-site review of the LEA program. As a result, the LEA has implemented and/or revised a CIP. TEA will monitor implementation of the CIP.
  • TEA On-Site Action Completed: Noncompliance Follow-up. TEA has completed an on-site review of the LEA program. As a result, the LEA has implemented and/or revised a CIP that includes actions to address noncompliance with program requirements. TEA will monitor implementation of the CIP and systemic correction of areas of noncompliance identified by the review.
  • Year After TEA On-Site Action: Routine Follow-up. TEA completed an on-site review of the LEA program in the prior year. As a result, the LEA implemented and/or revised a CIP that continued throughout the subsequent year. TEA continues to monitor implementation of the CIP.
  • Year After TEA On-Site Action: Noncompliance Follow-up. TEA completed an on-site review of the LEA program during the prior year. As a result the LEA implemented and/or revised a CIP that included actions to address noncompliance with program requirements, and the CIP continued throughout the subsequent year. TEA continues to monitor implementation of the CIP and systemic correction of areas of noncompliance identified by the review.
  • TEA On-Site Action Completed: Oversight/Sanction/Intervention. TEA has completed an on-site review of the LEA program. As a result: ongoing noncompliance for longer than one year was identified/confirmed; appropriate implementation of the TEA monitoring process, including submission of accurate data and appropriate implementation of intervention requirements, could not be verified; and/or CIP implementation was not proceeding as appropriate for the LEA. TEA oversight, sanctions, and interventions were implemented as a result.
  • Pending Random Data Verification. Regardless of whether a stage of intervention initially was assigned, an LEA may be subject to random selection for data review to ensure the integrity of monitoring system data and appropriate implementation of the program.
  • Pending Random Process Verification. Regardless of review results or stage of intervention, an LEA may be subject to random selection for process review to ensure the integrity of the implementation of the monitoring system, including data reporting and accuracy of findings.
  • Oversight/Sanction/Intervention. TEA oversight, sanctions, and interventions were implemented under the following circumstances: (a) the second CIP submission of an LEA at Stage 1, Stage 2, or Stage 3 Intervention was not adequate; (b) the CIP of an LEA at Stage 4 Intervention was not adequately developed after an on-site review; (c) ongoing noncompliance for longer than one year was identified; (d) CIP implementation was not proceeding as appropriate for any LEA; (e) the LEA previously was assigned on-site interventions and remained under escalated oversight during the period of transition after removal of those interventions; or (f) TEA could not verify appropriate implementation of TEA monitoring processes, including submission of accurate data, appropriate implementation of intervention requirements, and/or appropriate implementation of a CIP.
  • On-Site Intervention Assigned. TEA has assigned a technical assistance team, special purpose monitor, conservator, or management team to oversee correction of noncompliance and/or implementation of program and monitoring requirements.
  • Proposed Charter Non-Renewal. The charter school has been notified of TEA's intent not to renew the charter.
  • Campus Closure. The campus was closed as a result of TEA sanctions.
  • In Review. TEA had not completed initial review of the information submitted by the LEA.
  • No status is shown for LEAs not selected for PBM intervention for special education program areas.


Appendix H

Detailed Summary of English Language Learners Progress Measure
2008-09 (Preview of 2011)

Indicator Components

Details

Assessments

TAKS
TAKS (Accommodated)
TAKS-M
TELPAS

Subjects, Grades, Test Language

Reading/ELA in grades 3-11 in English (TAKS/TAKS (Accommodated)/TAKS-M)
Reading component in grades 3-11 (TELPAS)

Students

Current and monitored LEP students enrolled in at least their second year in U.S. schools and tested in at least one of the specified assessments.
For the assessments and LEP students specified, the performance of students served in special education is included.

Student Success Initiative
TAKS,
TAKS (Accommodated), &
TAKS-M

Grade 3 – first administration results only;
Grades 5 & 8 – first and second administration results.

Student Passing Standards

TAKS-M passing standards to be applied in 2010-11
TAKS and TAKS (Accommodated) passing standards applied in 2010-11, including a vertical scale adjustment for grades 6 and 8 reading tests.

Accountability Subset

The district indicator includes test results for students who were enrolled in the district in the fall and tested in the same district in the spring.  The campus indicator includes students who were enrolled on the campus in the fall and tested in the same campus in the spring.
TELPAS subsets and TAKS subsets are determined independently.

Texas Projection Measure (TPM)

The TPM is not used in this indicator.

Progress Criteria

1)    Met Standard on the TAKS/TAKS(Accommodated)/TAKS-M test,
or
2)    Met TELPAS criteria

(TELPAS criteria vary depending on years in U.S. schools and whether first time or previous TELPAS tester.  See TELPAS Criteria, below.)

TELPAS Criteria

1st time tester

Previous tester

1st Year in U.S. Schools

Not Evaluated

Not Evaluated

2nd Year in U.S. Schools

Intermediate or higher

At least one level higher than the previous year or Advanced or higher

3rd Year in U.S. Schools

Advanced or higher

Advanced or higher

4th or more years in U.S. Schools

Advanced High

Advanced High

Monitored LEP students first or second year after exit from LEP status

N/A (Only TAKS evaluated.)

N/A (Only TAKS evaluated.)



Appendix I

Graphic explaining Section III


Performance Reporting

 
 
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