Chapter 122. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education

Subchapter A. Home Economics Foundations, Middle School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter A issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

122.1. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education, Home Economics Foundations, Middle School.

The provisions of this subchapter shall supersede 75.50(a) of this title (relating to Life Management Skills) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.1 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.2. Skills for Living.

(a) General requirements. This comprehensive course is recommended for students in Grades 7-8.

(b) Introduction. Home economics education provides individuals and families with essential knowledge and skills for managing the challenges of living and working in a diverse, global society. Individuals utilize these skills to enhance career and personal effectiveness, promote family strength and well-being, and pursue career options.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Family relationships and personal development. The student explains how family relationships affect personal development. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the role of the family in meeting needs of family members;

(B) describe rights, responsibilities, and expectations of family members;

(C) propose strategies for promoting satisfying relationships with siblings;

(D) explain how positive family relationships contribute to personal effectiveness in other settings; and

(E) explain the interdependence of family members across the life span.

(2) Family relationships and personal development. The student relates personal development to choices in life. The student is expected to:

(A) identify factors influencing personal development;

(B) propose ways to promote positive self-image;

(C) relate personality traits to positive interpersonal relationships;

(D) determine personal strengths and abilities as they relate to choices in life; and

(E) demonstrate practices of effective leaders and team members.

(3) Family relationships and personal development. The student implements strategies that promote positive parent-child relationships across the life span. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the responsibilities of parenting;

(B) summarize the impact of parenthood on individuals and families;

(C) explain factors influencing parent-child relationships;

(D) identify changes in the parent-child relationship at different stages in the family life cycle;

(E) describe the effects of societal and cultural patterns on parenting roles; and

(F) analyze concepts and skills related to parent-child relationships across the life span.

(4) Family relationships and personal development. The student demonstrates behaviors that contribute to satisfying interpersonal relationships. The student is expected to:

(A) describe strategies that promote satisfying relationships among friends;

(B) determine personal characteristics that promote positive peer relationships;

(C) explain how diversity impacts interpersonal relationships; and

(D) propose effective responses to inappropriate behavior in interpersonal relationships.

(5) Family relationships and personal development. The student applies principles of effective communication. The student is expected to:

(A) describe characteristics of effective communication;

(B) demonstrate techniques for resolving conflicts, including assertiveness techniques and refusal skills;

(C) explain how cultural background influences patterns of communication; and

(D) practice communication skills appropriate for various relationships and occasions.

(6) Family relationships and personal development. The student describes child care practices that promote development. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize developmental principles, factors, and appropriate activities influencing the growth and development of children;

(B) simulate emergency situations requiring first aid;

(C) identify safety practices that are important when caring for children;

(D) apply appropriate child care practices to babysitting and caregiving;

(E) discuss causes, prevention, and treatment of child abuse and neglect; and

(F) identify resources available for the protection of children.

(7) Personal management. The student analyzes the relationship between decision making and acceptance of responsibility. The student is expected to:

(A) implement the decision-making process;

(B) describe the role of acceptance of responsibility in making decisions;

(C) summarize the effects of personal priorities and other influences on decisions; and

(D) predict personal, family, and societal implications of various decisions.

(8) Personal management. The student utilizes effective consumer practices promoting money management and goal setting. The student is expected to:

(A) describe practices that facilitate goal setting;

(B) identify resources involved in decision making;

(C) explain the importance of planning in the achievement of short-term and long-term goals;

(D) utilize the decision-making process and goal setting to guide spending; and

(E) apply consumer practices facilitating the best use of available funds.

(9) Personal management. The student describes management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple roles. The student is expected to:

(A) describe multiple roles of teens and their family members in society; and

(B) describe management skills needed to effectively manage multiple roles.

(10) Personal management. The student exhibits good nutrition and health practices that promote personal well-being and achievement across the life span. The student is expected to:

(A) identify practices that promote physical and mental health;

(B) explain dietary needs of individuals across the life span;

(C) describe eating disorders, their causes, and prevention;

(D) apply principles of good nutrition;

(E) identify sources of stress, including peer pressure;

(F) propose strategies and available resources for stress management; and

(G) relate the role of proper nutrition to well-being and achievement.

(11) Personal management. The student practices principles of good grooming and positive personal habits. The student is expected to:

(A) practice good grooming habits;

(B) summarize principles of clothing selection to meet needs and wants;

(C) demonstrate clothing-care procedures;

(D) determine consumer practices for effective management of the clothing budget; and

(E) analyze the role of grooming and apparel practices in personal effectiveness.

(12) Planning for the future. The student describes occupational opportunities in home economics and other career concentrations. The student is expected to:

(A) identify a variety of career options, including full-time homemaker;

(B) determine skills and educational requirements for identified careers;

(C) compare personal strengths, abilities, and goals to occupational requirements;

(D) explain how technology impacts family life and careers; and

(E) relate demands and rewards of identified careers to personal and family life.

(13) Planning for the future. The student evaluates personal goals in relation to planning for the future. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the impact of short-term and long-term goals in planning for the future;

(B) apply effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(C) apply effective study skills that promote academic achievement;

(D) identify resources that assist in educational planning;

(E) analyze the impact of career goals on personal behavior and educational decisions; and

(F) summarize the relationship between goal achievement, decision making, planning, and management.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.2 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

Chapter 122. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education

Subchapter B. Home Economics Foundations, High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter B issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

122.11. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education, Home Economics Foundations, High School.

The provisions of Chapter 122, Subchapters B-K, shall supersede 75.83 of this title (relating to Vocational Home Economics) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.11 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.12. Personal and Family Development (One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This comprehensive laboratory course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12. Each student is expected to complete a supervised career-connections experience each semester.

(b) Introduction. Home economics education provides individuals and families with essential knowledge and skills for managing the challenges of living and working in a diverse, global society. Individuals utilize these skills to enhance career and personal effectiveness, promote family strength and well-being, and pursue career options.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Personal development. The student demonstrates personal behavior reflecting sound decision making and responsibility. The student is expected to:

(A) compare characteristics of chronological, physical, emotional, social, and intellectual maturity;

(B) explain how personal priorities affect the choice of friends, activities, interests, and behaviors;

(C) practice social skills relevant to positive interactions with others in various situations;

(D) analyze the role of self-esteem in responsible behavior;

(E) explain how personal decisions and behavior are influenced by family, cultural, technological, societal, demographic, and economic considerations; and

(F) predict the implications of personal behavior and decisions on peers, families, society, and future generations.

(2) Personal development. The student applies principles for developing positive relationships. The student is expected to:

(A) describe qualities necessary to support strong relationships;

(B) analyze roles of communication in developing positive relationships;

(C) practice methods of conflict resolution and negotiation in peer relationships;

(D) determine how healthy relationships assist in preparation for adulthood;

(E) point out the effects of cultural patterns on relationships;

(F) explain how friends influence behavior; and

(G) develop strategies for managing peer pressure.

(3) Family studies. The student describes the basic structures of the family unit throughout the life cycle. The student is expected to:

(A) explain how family structure changes throughout the life cycle;

(B) explain how cultural diversity affects family structures in society; and

(C) interpret the effects of changing demographics on family structure.

(4) Family studies. The student analyzes family functions, roles, and responsibilities of family members. The student is expected to:

(A) identify basic functions of the family and its role in society;

(B) discuss societal, cultural, demographic, and economic factors affecting the responsibilities of family members;

(C) evaluate methods to promote the health and safety of individuals and family members;

(D) analyze the multiple roles and responsibilities assumed by individuals within the family;

(E) assess the impact of technology on roles and responsibilities of family members; and

(F) identify management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles.

(5) Family studies. The student determines factors that strengthen the family and create a sense of wellness. The student is expected to:

(A) describe factors that contribute to strong family units;

(B) analyze the impact of violence on families;

(C) identify causes and effects of family stress and techniques for management and prevention;

(D) practice methods of conflict resolution and negotiation in family relationships; and

(E) identify resources to aid in strengthening the family unit.

(6) Family studies. The student determines career options in the area of family services. The student is expected to:

(A) identify employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements in the area of family services; and

(B) describe rewards, demands, and future trends in careers related to family services.

(7) Child development. The student evaluates the responsibilities of parents and other caregivers in meeting the developmental needs of children. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the basic needs of children;

(B) describe patterns of intellectual, physical, social, and emotional development in children;

(C) identify resources for promoting the development of children, including those with special needs;

(D) analyze responsibilities of caregivers for promoting the development of children;

(E) determine the relationship of society and culture on meeting developmental needs of children; and

(F) demonstrate caregiver behaviors and strategies promoting the healthy intellectual, physical, social, and emotional development of children.

(8) Child development. The student analyzes various methods of guidance for children. The student is expected to:

(A) evaluate developmentally appropriate guidance techniques for children; and

(B) discuss causes, prevention, and treatment of child abuse.

(9) Child development. The student analyzes the responsibilities of parents and other caregivers for maintaining the health and safety of children. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the responsibilities of caregivers for maintaining the safety of children;

(B) analyze the caregiver's role in meeting the nutritional requirements of children; and

(C) outline practices that promote the health and wellness of children.

(10) Child development. The student determines career options related to child development and early childhood education. The student is expected to:

(A) identify employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements in the areas of child development and early childhood education; and

(B) describe rewards, demands, and future trends in child development careers.

(11) Apparel. The student analyzes consumer decision-making practices in individual and family apparel choices. The student is expected to:

(A) describe factors influencing apparel selection;

(B) determine consumer practices facilitating effective management of the apparel budget;

(C) describe clothing selection practices that accommodate personal needs, including age, lifestyle, special needs, and career;

(D) point out technological advancements affecting apparel decisions; and

(E) determine the relationship of apparel decisions to peer influence, self-esteem, and personal effectiveness.

(12) Apparel. The student practices clothing-care procedures. The student is expected to:

(A) interpret information on clothing-care labels;

(B) perform laundry procedures in accordance with clothing-care label information;

(C) describe practices for packing and storing apparel;

(D) utilize care labels and consumer skills as a basis for effectively securing appropriate clothing-care services;

(E) predict the impact of clothing-care requirements on overall wardrobe costs; and

(F) identify environmental issues related to clothing care and management.

(13) Apparel. The student utilizes principles of quality clothing construction in meeting clothing needs. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate safety practices when using and caring for tools and equipment;

(B) utilize principles of quality clothing construction in clothing selection, maintenance, repair, and alteration; and

(C) demonstrate planning, organizing, managing, and sequencing skills when illustrating simple clothing repair and alteration techniques.

(14) Apparel. The student determines career opportunities in the apparel industry. The student is expected to:

(A) identify employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements in apparel careers; and

(B) describe rewards, demands, and future trends in apparel careers.

(15) Nutrition and food. The student analyzes basic nutrition needs and results of dietary practices. The student is expected to:

(A) list classifications, sources, and functions of nutrients;

(B) compare personal diets to various guidelines;

(C) explain the effects of the life cycle, illness, and disease on individual dietary needs;

(D) analyze the problems and characteristics associated with eating disorders;

(E) discuss the effects of dietary practices on wellness and achievement;

(F) apply nutrition principles related to individual and family health decisions;

(G) determine cultural, economic, and societal influences on dietary practices and contemporary meal management; and

(H) analyze nutrition information on food labels.

(16) Nutrition and food. The student demonstrates table service and proper etiquette. The student is expected to:

(A) arrange table settings for a variety of occasions;

(B) demonstrate table manners and etiquette appropriate for a variety of occasions;

(C) explain the role of family mealtime in promoting family strength and the welfare of family members; and

(D) predict the influence of etiquette in the development of self-esteem and employability skills.

(17) Nutrition and food. The student demonstrates basic meal management techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the impact of technology on meal management;

(B) demonstrate basic principles of sanitation and safety relating to meal management;

(C) apply management techniques when planning and preparing simple meals and recipes;

(D) analyze cost effective meal management practices;

(E) describe types and safe use of equipment, tools, and utensils; and

(F) demonstrate basic food preparation techniques to achieve quality standards and preserve nutritive value.

(18) Nutrition and food. The student determines career options related to nutrition, food science, and wellness. The student is expected to:

(A) identify employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements in the area of nutrition, food science, and wellness; and

(B) describe rewards, demands, and future trends in careers related to nutrition, food science, and wellness.

(19) Consumer and resource management. The student applies the decision-making process. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the decision-making process;

(B) identify the role of responsibility in the decision-making process; and

(C) practice decision making consistent with personal considerations, such as needs, wants, goals, priorities, and resources.

(20) Consumer and resource management. The student demonstrates effective management practices. The student is expected to:

(A) explain principles of time, energy, financial, and task management;

(B) apply effective management practices in scheduling personal activities; and

(C) describe the correlation between effective personal management practices and quality of family life.

(21) Consumer and resource management. The student determines types of resources and considerations for responsible use. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize types of resources;

(B) identify sources of income;

(C) evaluate responsibility in managing personal and family resources;

(D) apply the decision-making process in planning the allocations and use of finances;

(E) determine cultural, economic, societal, and environmental influences on consumer decision making;

(F) analyze consumer-buying techniques that promote effective utilization of resources;

(G) point out the impact of technology on consumer-buying practices and options; and

(H) identify consumer rights and responsibilities.

(22) Consumer and resource management. The student explains how consumer economics and resource management skills impact career options. The student is expected to:

(A) identify employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements in the areas of consumer and resource management;

(B) describe rewards, demands, and future trends in consumer economics and resource management careers; and

(C) determine the significance of consumer economics and resource management skills in all careers.

(23) Housing. The student analyzes human and environmental influences on family housing needs across the life span. The student is expected to:

(A) identify housing priorities and needs;

(B) describe environmental and technological influences on housing decisions; and

(C) analyze housing considerations related to meeting family housing needs and promoting family strength.

(24) Housing. The student determines types and costs of housing. The student is expected to:

(A) identify types of single and multifamily housing;

(B) describe advantages and disadvantages of various housing types;

(C) determine methods of controlling housing costs; and

(D) discuss cultural, demographic, societal, and economic factors and their effect on housing trends.

(25) Housing. The student follows guidelines for the selection, use, maintenance, and care of home furnishings and equipment. The student is expected to:

(A) identify aesthetic and functional considerations guiding home furnishings selection and use;

(B) determine methods of controlling home furnishings and equipment costs;

(C) describe safe use and care of home furnishings and major household equipment;

(D) demonstrate home maintenance and sanitation procedures; and

(E) determine home safety hazards and methods to correct them.

(26) Housing. The student determines career opportunities related to the housing industry. The student is expected to:

(A) identify employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements in housing; and

(B) describe rewards, demands, and future trends in housing careers.

(27) Career preparation. The student exhibits qualities of effective leaders and team members. The student is expected to:

(A) evaluate leadership characteristics;

(B) practice leadership skills;

(C) describe qualities of effective team members;

(D) describe the relationship of leadership and teamwork skills to preparation for employment and adult roles; and

(E) determine techniques effective leaders and team members use to promote an appreciation and understanding of cultural diversity.

(28) Career preparation. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of personal and family development. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of personal and family development; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies developed in the study of personal and family development.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.12 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.13. Career Studies (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This comprehensive course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction. Home economics education provides individuals and families with essential knowledge and skills for managing the challenges of living and working in a diverse, global society. Individuals utilize these skills to enhance career and personal effectiveness, promote family strength and well-being, and pursue career options.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Career preparation. The student analyzes factors influencing career choices. The student is expected to:

(A) evaluate interests, abilities, and personal priorities related to employment;

(B) explain the decision-making process associated with career selection;

(C) determine preparation requirements for various levels of employment;

(D) identify economic indicators that affect career selection;

(E) determine the impact of societal patterns and changing demographics on career choices;

(F) determine the impact of technology on career options and choices;

(G) identify entrepreneurial opportunities within the home economics/family and consumer sciences profession;

(H) describe ways personal health affects career choices;

(I) examine how family structures and cultural patterns affect career choices;

(J) analyze the relationship of career choice, retirement plans, and family life-cycle stage; and

(K) determine the social, psychological, and financial implications of employment.

(2) Career preparation. The student demonstrates employability skills that lead to career success. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(B) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(C) discuss how community service and work experiences contribute to employability;

(D) practice positive interpersonal skills including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership;

(E) demonstrate productive work habits and attitudes;

(F) explain how competence in using resources, information, technology, and systems affects employability; and

(G) describe practices that facilitate management of multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles.

(3) Career preparation. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of career opportunities in the home economics/family and consumer sciences profession. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of career opportunities in the home economics/family and consumer sciences profession; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies developed in the study of career opportunities in the home economics/family and consumer sciences profession.

(4) Career opportunities. The student evaluates career opportunities in child development and early childhood education. The student is expected to:

(A) determine educational requirements and career opportunities related to child development and early childhood education careers in human services, science and technology, education and communication, business and marketing, and art;

(B) describe future trends in child development and early childhood education careers in human services, science and technology, education and communication, business and marketing, and art; and

(C) analyze components of all aspects of the industry in relation to career opportunities in child development and early childhood education.

(5) Career opportunities. The student evaluates career opportunities in family studies and human services. The student is expected to:

(A) determine educational requirements and career opportunities related to family studies and human services careers in human services, science and technology, education and communication, business and marketing, and art;

(B) describe future trends in family studies and human services careers in human services, science and technology, education and communication, business and marketing, and art; and

(C) analyze components of all aspects of the industry in relation to career opportunities in family studies and human services.

(6) Career opportunities. The student evaluates career opportunities in consumer and resource management. The student is expected to:

(A) determine educational requirements and career opportunities related to consumer and resource management careers in human services, science and technology, education and communication, business and marketing, and art;

(B) describe future trends in consumer and resource management careers in human services, science and technology, education and communication, business and marketing, and art; and

(C) analyze components of all aspects of the industry in relation to career opportunities in consumer and resource management.

(7) Career opportunities. The student evaluates career opportunities in the hospitality industry. The student is expected to:

(A) determine educational requirements and career opportunities related to hospitality careers in human services, science and technology, education and communication, business and marketing, and art;

(B) describe future trends in hospitality careers in human services, science and technology, education and communication, business and marketing, and art; and

(C) analyze components of all aspects of the industry in relation to career opportunities in the hospitality industry.

(8) Career opportunities. The student evaluates career opportunities in the textile and apparel industries. The student is expected to:

(A) determine educational requirements and career opportunities related to textile and apparel careers in human services, science and technology, education and communication, business and marketing, and art;

(B) describe future trends in textile and apparel careers in human services, science and technology, education and communication, business and marketing, and art; and

(C) analyze components of all aspects of the industry in relation to career opportunities in the textile and apparel industries.

(9) Career opportunities. The student evaluates career opportunities in nutrition and wellness/food science and technology. The student is expected to:

(A) determine educational requirements and career opportunities related to nutrition and wellness/food science and technology in human services, science and technology, education and communication, business and marketing, and art;

(B) describe future trends in nutrition and wellness/food science and technology in human services, science and technology, education and communication, business and marketing, and art; and

(C) analyze components of all aspects of the industry in relation to career opportunities in nutrition and wellness/food science and technology.

(10) Career opportunities. The student evaluates career opportunities in environmental design. The student is expected to:

(A) determine educational requirements and career opportunities related to environmental design careers in human services, science and technology, education and communication, business and marketing, and art;

(B) describe future trends in environmental design in human services, science and technology, education and communication, business and marketing, and art; and

(C) analyze components of all aspects of the industry in relation to career opportunities in environmental design.

(11) Career opportunities. The student evaluates education career opportunities within the home economics/family and consumer sciences profession. The student is expected to:

(A) determine preparation requirements and opportunities for education careers within the home economics/family and consumer sciences profession;

(B) describe future trends in education careers within the home economics/family and consumer sciences profession; and

(C) analyze components of all aspects of the industry in relation to education career opportunities within the home economics/family and consumer sciences profession.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.13 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.14. Family and Career Management (One-Half Credit).

(a) General requirements. This comprehensive course is recommended for students in Grades 11-12.

(b) Introduction. Home economics education provides individuals and families with essential knowledge and skills for managing the challenges of living and working in a diverse, global society. Individuals utilize these skills to enhance career and personal effectiveness, promote family strength and well-being, and pursue career options.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Preparation for family and career roles. The student determines transferable skills necessary to function effectively in family, community, and wage-earner roles. The student is expected to:

(A) determine personal and family management skills that transfer to the workplace and community;

(B) assess changes in the job market and the resulting impact on the family; and

(C) identify ways family members and family practices promote lifelong learning.

(2) Preparation for family and career roles. The student analyzes the impact of technology on the changing workforce and on the family. The student is expected to:

(A) describe technological skills required for the workplace;

(B) explain the impact of technology on the workforce and family; and

(C) describe the effect of technology on personal and family life management.

(3) Preparation for family and career roles. The student correlates personal and family strengths to employment opportunities. The student is expected to:

(A) assess personal interests, characteristics, skills, and their compatibility with varied career options;

(B) determine a variety of career options and preparation requirements; and

(C) describe the correlation between family support and job success.

(4) Preparation for family and career roles. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of family and career management. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of family and career management; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies developed in the study of family and career management.

(5) Personal and career effectiveness. The student compares relationship skills to personal and career success. The student is expected to:

(A) identify methods for developing and maintaining successful professional relationships; and

(B) analyze the influence of positive interpersonal relationship skills on job success.

(6) Personal and career effectiveness. The student exhibits personal characteristics that lead to career and personal success. The student is expected to:

(A) relate positive attitude to job and family effectiveness;

(B) exhibit communication and interpersonal skills, including conflict resolution and negotiation, for developing personal and professional relationships;

(C) practice time and stress management techniques;

(D) demonstrate decision-making, goal-setting, and problem-solving skills;

(E) determine skills related to diversity that impact career and personal effectiveness;

(F) analyze appropriate dress and grooming for the workplace;

(G) demonstrate business and personal etiquette;

(H) demonstrate skills and characteristics of leaders and effective team members;

(I) explain how to work within organizational structures to meet employer goals;

(J) demonstrate effective techniques to secure, maintain, and terminate employment; and

(K) demonstrate verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills.

(7) Personal and career effectiveness. The student describes ways businesses contribute to family strengths and parental effectiveness. The student is expected to:

(A) describe contributions of business to employees' balancing responsibilities of family, community, and wage-earner roles;

(B) identify workplace policies and practices supportive of families; and

(C) describe management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles.

(8) Personal and career effectiveness. The student analyzes health-related issues affecting employees in the workplace. The student is expected to:

(A) determine occupational implications of substance abuse;

(B) summarize company policies regarding mandatory drug testing;

(C) summarize various employment policies regarding physical limitations and chronic health conditions;

(D) describe workplace programs that promote good nutrition and exercise; and

(E) identify environmental considerations and essential safety practices at work.

(9) Personal and career effectiveness. The student describes the impact of ethical and legal practices in the workplace. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize federal regulations governing employment practices;

(B) identify forms of ethical and legal violations in the workplace;

(C) identify strategies to address ethical and legal violations; and

(D) discuss abuse of privileges, conflict of interest, and preferential treatment.

(10) Effective management. The student exhibits resource management techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) identify personal resources;

(B) develop time management strategies;

(C) explain the effect of priorities on personal and family management decisions; and

(D) analyze components of effective financial management.

(11) Effective management. The student practices effective decision making in meeting personal and family clothing needs. The student is expected to:

(A) identify factors affecting personal and family clothing selection;

(B) practice clothing care and maintenance;

(C) analyze factors affecting the management of the personal and family clothing budget; and

(D) demonstrate personal and business wardrobe planning skills.

(12) Effective management. The student practices effective decision making in meeting personal and family housing needs. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize housing options and considerations for selection;

(B) estimate the expense of obtaining furnishings and maintaining living space;

(C) determine skills necessary for managing and maintaining a home; and

(D) summarize laws and regulations affecting housing.

(13) Effective management. The student determines food choices that promote good health. The student is expected to:

(A) determine considerations in planning nutritionally adequate meals for individuals and families;

(B) determine food budget considerations;

(C) compare the cost of foods from different sources; and

(D) plan menus considering skills, time limitations, and nutritional needs.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.14 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

Chapter 122. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education

Subchapter C. Family Studies and Human Services, High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter C issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

122.21. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education, Family Studies and Human Services, High School.

The provisions of Chapter 122, Subchapters B-K, shall supersede 75.83 of this title (relating to Vocational Home Economics) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.21 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.22. Individual and Family Life (One-Half Credit).

(a) General requirements. This technical course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction. The relationships between individuals and among family members significantly affect the quality of life. Individuals use knowledge and skills in family studies and human services to enhance personal development, foster quality relationships, promote wellness of family members, manage multiple adult roles, and pursue careers related to these fields of study.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Personal development. The student evaluates factors related to personal development. The student is expected to:

(A) describe factors that affect personal identity, personality, and self-esteem;

(B) analyze how the family influences the development of personal identity and self-esteem of all family members, including those with special needs; and

(C) propose strategies that promote physical, emotional, intellectual, and social development.

(2) Personal development. The student determines short-term and long-term implications of personal decisions. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize the decision-making process;

(B) discuss consequences and responsibilities of decisions; and

(C) evaluate the effect of decisions on health, well-being, family, interpersonal relationships, employment, and society as a whole.

(3) Personal development. The student analyzes considerations related to the transition to independent adulthood. The student is expected to:

(A) describe adjustments related to achieving independence; and

(B) determine responsibilities of living as an independent adult.

(4) Interpersonal relationships. The student analyzes the family's role in relationship development. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the development of relationships;

(B) explain the family's role in fostering the abilities of its members to develop healthy relationships; and

(C) analyze effects of cultural patterns on family relationships.

(5) Interpersonal relationships. The student analyzes relationship development outside the family. The student is expected to:

(A) describe ways to promote friendship;

(B) describe the influence of peers on the individual;

(C) determine appropriate responses to authority figures;

(D) propose ways to promote an appreciation of diversity;

(E) assess the importance of attitude in relationships; and

(F) discuss functions and roles of dating.

(6) Interpersonal relationships. The student determines factors related to marital success. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze components of a successful marriage; and

(B) determine communication skills and practices that strengthen marriage.

(7) Effective individual and family functioning. The student determines methods that promote an effective family unit. The student is expected to:

(A) describe family structures;

(B) explain the role of the individual within the family;

(C) compare functions of families in various cultures;

(D) predict the effects of societal, demographic, and economic trends on individuals and the family;

(E) appraise ways to strengthen functions in varied family structures;

(F) determine procedures for meeting individual and family needs through resource management;

(G) explain how technology influences family functions and relationships; and

(H) determine the impact of effective family functioning on community and society.

(8) Effective individual and family functioning. The student determines how changes occurring throughout the family life cycle impact individuals and families. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the stages of the family life cycle;

(B) describe roles and responsibilities of individuals and family members throughout the family life cycle;

(C) analyze financial considerations related to the family life cycle; and

(D) predict the benefits of technological advances on families throughout the family life cycle.

(9) Effective individual and family functioning. The student analyzes types of needs and crises experienced by individuals and families. The student is expected to:

(A) categorize types of crises and their effect on individuals and families;

(B) determine strategies for prevention and management of individual and family problems and crises;

(C) identify resources and support systems that provide assistance to families in crisis;

(D) determine management strategies and technology available to meet special needs of family members; and

(E) summarize laws and public policies related to the family.

(10) Effective individual and family functioning. The student determines stress management effective for individuals and families. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the impact of stress on individuals and relationships;

(B) identify factors contributing to stress; and

(C) practice techniques for managing stress.

(11) Career preparation. The student determines opportunities and preparation requirements for careers in the field of family studies and human services. The student is expected to:

(A) determine employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements for careers in the field of family studies and human services;

(B) determine how interests, abilities, and personal priorities affect career choice; and

(C) propose short-term and long-term career goals.

(12) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills. The student is expected to:

(A) practice effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(B) analyze the influence of cultural background on patterns of communication;

(C) practice positive interpersonal skills including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership;

(D) demonstrate effective techniques to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(E) determine ethical practices in the workplace; and

(F) utilize leadership and team member skills in problem-solving situations.

(13) Career preparation. The student analyzes management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles. The student is expected to:

(A) determine the impact of career choice on family life;

(B) describe the effect of family life on workplace productivity;

(C) determine employment practices and trends that support families; and

(D) explain how technology impacts career options and family roles.

(14) Career preparation. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of individual and family life. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of individual and family life; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies developed in the study of individual and family life.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.22 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.23. Family Health Needs (One-Half Credit).

(a) General requirements. This technical course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction. The relationships between individuals and among family members significantly affect the quality of life. Individuals use knowledge and skills in family studies and human services to enhance personal development, foster quality relationships, promote wellness of family members, manage multiple adult roles, and pursue careers related to these fields of study.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Health and wellness of family members. The student promotes principles of good health and wellness for family members across the life span. The student is expected to:

(A) identify principles and implications of good personal health for family members; and

(B) evaluate the role of personal management in maintaining good health and wellness.

(2) Health and wellness of family members. The student evaluates the effect of nutrition in maintaining health and wellness of family members. The student is expected to:

(A) determine dietary practices that meet the nutritional needs of individuals and family members throughout the life span; and

(B) explain the role of nutrition in managing special health needs of family members.

(3) Health and wellness of family members. The student explains how stress management promotes physical and mental health of family members. The student is expected to:

(A) identify causes of stress and its impact on individuals and families;

(B) determine stress management techniques and available resources; and

(C) determine how healthy individual and family lifestyles contribute to stress management.

(4) Management of health needs. The student determines practices that promote health and safety of family members, including those with special needs. The student is expected to:

(A) discuss common family health problems, causes, prevention, and appropriate sources of treatment;

(B) describe personal hygiene and home sanitation procedures that contribute to disease prevention;

(C) determine typical causes of home health emergencies;

(D) outline appropriate actions of various family members in response to home emergencies; and

(E) describe ways to prevent environmental and safety hazards in the home.

(5) Management of health needs. The student analyzes family health-care options. The student is expected to:

(A) identify available family health-care resources;

(B) explain how technology impacts health-care services;

(C) describe the health-care system and structures for the delivery of medical services; and

(D) determine criteria for selecting professional medical services for family members.

(6) Management of health needs. The student analyzes the impact of illness, accidents, and special health needs on the family. The student is expected to:

(A) determine the health-care costs of common accidents and diseases;

(B) identify resources and methods for managing the health-care costs of family members;

(C) compare characteristics and benefits of different approaches to providing for the health-care needs of family members; and

(D) describe the physical, emotional, and social impact of illness, accidents, and special health needs on the family.

(7) Special family health needs and issues. The student analyzes skills and strategies needed to meet special health needs. The student is expected to:

(A) identify special health needs of individuals;

(B) determine management strategies for meeting special health needs within the family;

(C) identify skills needed by caregivers of family members with special health needs;

(D) identify modification requirements in diet, clothing, and environment needed by family members with special health needs; and

(E) identify resources and technological advances that can be utilized in meeting the special needs of family members.

(8) Special family health needs and issues. The student determines management options for meeting special health needs of older family members. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the psychological, physical, social, and economic changes that occur during later adulthood;

(B) assess services available through home health care, support groups, and elder care options;

(C) explain the importance of proper diet and exercise to the health and well-being of older adults;

(D) determine implications for family members living in multigenerational households; and

(E) describe technological advances that expand elder care options.

(9) Special family health needs and issues. The student analyzes family health issues. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the family's role in the prevention of eating disorders;

(B) assess the impact of substance abuse on the individual and family; and

(C) describe methods for prevention of various forms of abuse and neglect of family members.

(10) Special family health needs and issues. The student analyzes the effect of public policy on the individual and family health-care field. The student is expected to:

(A) identify laws, policies, trends, and issues affecting family health and the cost of care;

(B) summarize laws and public policies that impact individuals with special health needs and their families;

(C) describe the interrelationship of the health-care field and the U.S. economy; and

(D) research the impact of changing demographics on public policy.

(11) Career preparation. The student makes informed career decisions that reflect personal, family, and career goals. The student is expected to:

(A) determine personal characteristics appropriate for individual and family health-care careers;

(B) propose short-term and long-term career goals;

(C) evaluate employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements for careers related to individual and family health;

(D) predict emerging careers related to the increasing older adult population and to technological advances in family health care; and

(E) describe management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles.

(12) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills. The student is expected to:

(A) determine effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(B) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(C) practice positive human-relations skills;

(D) demonstrate skills, characteristics, and responsibilities of leaders and effective team members; and

(E) determine ethical practices in careers related to individual and family health.

(13) Career preparation. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of family health needs. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of family health needs; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies developed in the study of family health needs.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.23 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.24. Services for Older Adults (Two to Three Credits).

(a) General requirements. This course provides occupationally specific training and is recommended for students in Grades 11-12. Students may be awarded two to three credits per year for one to two years for the successful completion of this course. Instruction may be delivered through school-based pre-employment laboratory training or through work-based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, preceptorships, mentoring, and job shadowing. The two recommended prerequisites for this course are: Family Health Needs, Nutrition and Food Science.

(b) Introduction. The relationships between individuals and among family members significantly affect the quality of life. Individuals use knowledge and skills in family studies and human services to enhance personal development, foster quality relationships, promote wellness of family members, manage multiple adult roles, and pursue careers related to these fields of study.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Quality of life. The student analyzes factors affecting the older adult population. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the aging process;

(B) describe characteristics and care needs of older adults;

(C) identify laws, trends, and issues affecting older adults;

(D) analyze factors contributing to the growing older adult population;

(E) predict how changing demographics impact older adults and society as a whole;

(F) determine the role of older adults, their status, and contributions in various cultures;

(G) analyze the influences of technology on the health care and lifestyle of older adults; and

(H) identify resources for addressing the various needs of older adults.

(2) Quality of life. The student determines appropriate communication techniques for interacting with older adults. The student is expected to:

(A) describe communication and guidance techniques appropriate for older adults functioning at various levels;

(B) implement strategies that enhance cooperation and involvement between family members and older adults; and

(C) utilize appropriate applications of technology that enhance opportunities for older adults to maintain involvement, pursue lifelong learning, and continue making contributions to society.

(3) Quality of life. The student evaluates the nutritional requirements and needs of older adults. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the functions and sources of nutrients;

(B) apply principles of nutrition to meet the daily food requirements of older adults;

(C) identify common dietary deficiencies and disorders associated with older adults;

(D) determine available technology that aids in dietary modifications for older adults;

(E) analyze factors affecting diets and eating practices of older adults with special needs;

(F) summarize food preparation and service techniques that facilitate retention of nutrients;

(G) propose methods to enhance older adults' independence in meal preparation; and

(H) appraise food and nutrition resources.

(4) Quality of life. The student analyzes contributions of older adults to society. The student is expected to:

(A) determine contributions older adults make to society through personal achievement, family life, employment, and volunteerism; and

(B) predict ways an increasing older adult population can benefit society.

(5) Needs of older adults. The student implements appropriate practices for meeting the physical needs of older adults. The student is expected to:

(A) describe physical characteristics typical of the aging process;

(B) perform appropriate techniques for promoting independence among older adults with physical limitations;

(C) determine caregiver strategies appropriate to accommodate physical limitations of older adults;

(D) conduct physical activities appropriate for older adults; and

(E) identify considerations when selecting appropriate housing, furnishings, clothing, and transportation for older adults at various levels of functioning.

(6) Needs of older adults. The student implements appropriate practices for meeting the emotional needs of older adults. The student is expected to:

(A) identify special emotional needs of older adults;

(B) summarize ways to alleviate insecurities and loss of dignity experienced by some older adults;

(C) describe techniques that promote emotional adjustments to losses;

(D) describe crisis management techniques;

(E) determine the impact of family support on the emotional well-being of older relatives; and

(F) utilize caregiver techniques promoting positive emotional health of older adults.

(7) Needs of older adults. The student implements appropriate practices for meeting the intellectual needs of older adults. The student is expected to:

(A) differentiate between effects of aging and disease on mental abilities;

(B) describe mental disorders commonly associated with some older adults;

(C) analyze methods that caregivers can use to promote mental alertness;

(D) determine caregiver strategies appropriate to accommodate persons with mental limitations;

(E) determine techniques promoting independence among older adults with mental limitations; and

(F) conduct appropriate intellectually stimulating activities to meet varying needs of older adults.

(8) Needs of older adults. The student implements appropriate practices for meeting the social needs of older adults. The student is expected to:

(A) assess the impact of culture on the role of older adults;

(B) summarize theories associated with social changes of aging;

(C) identify ways to meet the social needs of older adults;

(D) point out factors influencing the social needs of older adults; and

(E) utilize planning and group leadership techniques to meet the recreational needs of older adults.

(9) Elder care. The student describes effective management practices related to care of older adults. The student is expected to:

(A) describe types and multiple responsibilities of caregivers;

(B) identify types of facilities and levels of care for older adults;

(C) demonstrate productive work habits and attitudes;

(D) exhibit communication skills needed in all levels of care;

(E) practice effective stress management strategies when providing services for older adults;

(F) determine resources for caregivers and older adults;

(G) describe management functions in facilities for older adults; and

(H) determine technological business applications used in management of elder care facilities.

(10) Elder care. The student determines procedures for promoting the health and wellness of older adults. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the causes and prevention of communicable diseases;

(B) identify community resources for assistance in emergencies;

(C) identify possible signs of illness in older adults;

(D) describe types of elder abuse, neglect, and prevention; and

(E) implement routine procedures that promote health and wellness of older adults.

(11) Elder care. The student analyzes the components of a safe, sanitary environment. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the importance of a safe and sanitary environment;

(B) practice sanitation procedures;

(C) utilize personal sanitation measures to prevent the spread of infection and disease;

(D) point out hazardous elements in an older person's home or care facility; and

(E) propose housing adaptations for the special needs of older adults.

(12) Elder care. The student determines procedures used in personal care of older adults. The student is expected to:

(A) describe technological advances that facilitate care of older adults;

(B) promote self-reliance while assisting older adults with personal care and hygiene;

(C) practice special housekeeping and maintenance skills associated with older adults; and

(D) evaluate personal care procedures and schedules in an elder care facility.

(13) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills which lead to job success in services for older adults. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(B) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(C) demonstrate positive interpersonal skills including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership;

(D) evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and achievement;

(E) demonstrate appropriate grooming and appearance for the workplace;

(F) demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette in the workplace;

(G) exhibit productive work habits and attitudes; and

(H) analyze opportunities in volunteer work with older adults.

(14) Career preparation. The student determines employment opportunities and preparation requirements in services for older adults. The student is expected to:

(A) determine preparation requirements for various levels of employment in a variety of careers that provide services to older adults;

(B) analyze the future employment outlook in services for older adults;

(C) describe entrepreneurial opportunities in services for older adults;

(D) determine how interests, abilities, personal priorities, and family responsibilities affect career choice;

(E) compare rewards and demands for various levels of employment in a variety of careers; and

(F) determine continuing education opportunities that enhance career advancement and promote lifelong learning.

(15) Career preparation. The student demonstrates ethical practices in providing services for older adults. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees;

(B) describe the rights and responsibilities of older adults as clients;

(C) exhibit ethical practices in providing services for older adults;

(D) point out strategies for advocating for the rights of older adults; and

(E) analyze fraudulent and deceptive practices that victimize older adults.

(16) Career preparation. The student analyzes the management of multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze challenges of managing multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles; and

(B) exhibit management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple roles.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.24 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

Chapter 122. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education

Subchapter D. Child Development, Education, and Services; High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter D issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

122.31. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education, Child Development, Education, and Services; High School.

The provisions of Chapter 122, Subchapters B-K, shall supersede 75.83 of this title (relating to Vocational Home Economics) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.31 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.32. Preparation for Parenting (One-Half Credit).

(a) General requirements. This technical laboratory course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction. Knowledge and skills related to child growth and development equip individuals to develop positive relationships with children and effective parenting and caregiver skills. Individuals use these skills to promote the well-being and healthy development of children, strengthen families in a culturally diverse society, and pursue careers related to the care and education of children.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Preparation for parenthood. The student analyzes factors affecting the decision to parent. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the role of personal goals and priorities in the decision to parent;

(B) describe personal health and genetic considerations that could impact the decision to parent;

(C) analyze the impact of the decision to parent on individuals and families;

(D) determine cultural and societal factors that influence the decision to parent; and

(E) determine the social, emotional, intellectual, physical, and financial readiness required for parenting.

(2) Preparation for parenthood. The student describes parenting in various family structures. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the implications of various family structures on parenting practices and child care options; and

(B) determine the legal responsibilities involved in parenting.

(3) Preparation for parenthood. The student analyzes the impact on the family of physical and emotional changes that occur during pregnancy. The student is expected to:

(A) describe signs of pregnancy;

(B) describe components of good prenatal care;

(C) summarize possible complications of pregnancy; and

(D) summarize the impact of pregnancy on the family.

(4) Effective parenting. The student analyzes the multiple roles of parents throughout the family life cycle. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the changing roles of parents throughout the family life cycle;

(B) determine strategies for managing the multiple roles of parents;

(C) analyze the impact of changing societal patterns and demographics on the role of parents, children, and other family members throughout the life span;

(D) determine resources affecting management of multiple adult roles; and

(E) describe techniques for effective stress management.

(5) Effective parenting. The student analyzes child care options within and outside the home. The student is expected to:

(A) compare child care options for children of various ages;

(B) explain the financial considerations of child care options; and

(C) identify criteria for selecting quality child care.

(6) Effective parenting. The student analyzes parental responsibilities that promote health and wellness of children. The student is expected to:

(A) identify signs of good health and symptoms of illness in children;

(B) describe parental practices that contribute to the health and wellness of children;

(C) identify strategies that promote safe environments for children;

(D) determine responsibilities of parents in appropriately managing the safety and health care of children;

(E) explain responsibilities of parents in providing children with nutritionally adequate diets; and

(F) determine resources available for managing the health care of children.

(7) Effective parenting. The student analyzes roles and responsibilities of parents as their children's first teachers. The student is expected to:

(A) determine the roles and responsibilities of parents related to the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development of children;

(B) identify positive role modeling behaviors;

(C) identify strategies for optimizing the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development of children, including those with special needs; and

(D) point out strategies for promoting communication between parents and children.

(8) Effective parenting. The student analyzes the effect of play in the development of children. The student is expected to:

(A) explain how play promotes the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development of children;

(B) describe characteristics and safety features of developmentally appropriate play activities, toys, and equipment for children;

(C) describe strategies parents may use to encourage constructive play;

(D) determine potential uses of technology, media, and resources to foster healthy child development; and

(E) determine safeguards to prevent misuse and abuse of technology and media with children.

(9) Effective parenting. The student summarizes appropriate guidance techniques for children of various ages and developmental levels. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the various types of guidance;

(B) determine appropriate guidance techniques;

(C) describe parenting styles and the effects on children;

(D) explain behaviors that may lead to child abuse; and

(E) identify strategies that deter abusive behavior.

(10) Effective parenting. The student evaluates how individual and family crises affect family relationships and parenting. The student is expected to:

(A) identify family crises;

(B) analyze how family crises affect family and parenting relationships;

(C) determine strategies for preventing and coping with family crises;

(D) summarize resources available to assist families; and

(E) discuss society's role in the protection of individuals and families.

(11) Career preparation. The student makes informed career decisions that reflect personal, family, and career goals. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the impact of career decisions on parenting;

(B) propose short-term and long-term career goals;

(C) assess personal interests, aptitudes, and abilities needed in the family-services profession;

(D) exhibit employability skills;

(E) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(F) demonstrate skills and characteristics of leaders and effective team members; and

(G) evaluate employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and educational requirements in the family-services profession;

(12) Career preparation. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of parenting. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of parenting; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies developed in the study of parenting.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.32 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.33. Child Development (One-Half Credit).

(a) General requirements. This technical laboratory course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction. Knowledge and skills related to child growth and development equip individuals to develop positive relationships with children and effective parenting and caregiver skills. Individuals use these skills to promote the well-being and healthy development of children, strengthen families in a culturally diverse society, and pursue careers related to the care and education of children.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Prenatal care and development. The student explains components of prenatal care and development. The student is expected to:

(A) describe nutritional needs prior to and during pregnancy;

(B) analyze reasons for medical care and good health practices prior to and during pregnancy;

(C) identify signs of pregnancy; and

(D) outline stages of prenatal development.

(2) Prenatal care and development. The student determines hereditary and environmental factors affecting prenatal development. The student is expected to:

(A) discuss the role of genetics in prenatal development;

(B) determine environmental factors affecting development of the fetus; and

(C) discuss the impact of technological advances on prenatal care and development.

(3) Prenatal care and development. The student explains the process of delivery. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the stages of labor;

(B) summarize methods of delivery; and

(C) describe possible complications of delivery.

(4) Infancy. The student analyzes the growth, development, and care of the newborn. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development of the newborn;

(B) explain the relationship of nurturing to the growth and development of the newborn;

(C) describe the influence of the family on the growth and development of the newborn;

(D) summarize strategies for optimizing the development of newborns, including those with special needs; and

(E) describe positive caregiving techniques.

(5) Infancy. The student analyzes the growth, development, and care of the infant. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development of the infant;

(B) analyze various theories of psychosocial and intellectual development;

(C) determine the influences of the family and society on the infant;

(D) summarize strategies for optimizing the development of infants, including those with special needs;

(E) determine techniques that promote the health and safety of an infant; and

(F) determine developmentally appropriate guidance techniques during the first year of life.

(6) Infancy. The student describes family adjustments occurring in response to the addition of a child to the family. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze emotional changes occurring after the addition of a child to the family;

(B) discuss shared parenting responsibilities;

(C) describe strategies for managing the multiple roles of family members;

(D) discuss considerations for parents in maintaining their relationship after the addition of children to the family; and

(E) describe family financial adjustments resulting from the addition of a child to the family.

(7) Toddler, preschool, and school-age child. The student analyzes the growth and development of the toddler. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development of the toddler;

(B) determine the role of play in a toddler's growth and development;

(C) summarize strategies for optimizing the development of toddlers, including those with special needs; and

(D) determine developmentally appropriate guidance techniques for use with toddlers.

(8) Toddler, preschool, and school-age child. The student analyzes the growth and development of the preschool child. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development of the preschool child;

(B) describe the role of play in a preschool child's growth and development;

(C) summarize strategies for optimizing the development of preschool children, including those with special needs; and

(D) determine developmentally appropriate guidance techniques for a preschool child.

(9) Toddler, preschool, and school-age child. The student analyzes the growth and development of the school-age child. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development of the school-age child;

(B) analyze the role of the school environment on the growth and development of the school-age child;

(C) summarize strategies for optimizing the growth and development of school-age children, including those with special needs; and

(D) determine developmentally appropriate guidance techniques for the school-age child.

(10) Care and protection of children. The student evaluates child care agencies and services available to families. The student is expected to:

(A) identify criteria for assessing the quality of child care;

(B) compare child care options;

(C) point out characteristics of quality child care that reflect the philosophy of the caregiver serving as teacher;

(D) determine the influences of child care on family economics;

(E) determine agencies and services that protect the rights of children;

(F) summarize various resources focusing on children;

(G) predict the impact of changing demographics and cultural diversity on the health and welfare of children; and

(H) discuss legislation and public policies affecting children.

(11) Care and protection of children. The student describes the impact of child abuse on children and families. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze forms, causes, and effects of child abuse;

(B) summarize prevention and treatment of child abuse; and

(C) discuss responsibilities of citizens to report child abuse.

(12) Care and protection of children. The student analyzes practices that promote the health and wellness of children. The student is expected to:

(A) describe factors essential to the health and safety of children;

(B) explain the impact of appropriate health care on the well-being of children;

(C) suggest techniques for promoting healthy dietary practices in children of various ages; and

(D) describe practices that promote the safety of children at various developmental levels.

(13) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate skills, characteristics, and responsibilities of leaders and effective team members;

(B) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(C) practice human-relations skills;

(D) explain obligations of employees and employers in terminating employment; and

(E) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills.

(14) Career preparation. The student makes informed career decisions that reflect personal, family, and career goals. The student is expected to:

(A) assess personal interests, aptitudes, and abilities;

(B) evaluate employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and education requirements in the field of child development and early childhood education;

(C) propose short-term and long-term career goals; and

(D) describe management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles.

(15) Career preparation. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of child development. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of child development; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies in the study of child development.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.33 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.34. Child Care and Guidance, Management, and Services (Two to Three Credits).

(a) General requirements. This course provides occupationally specific training and is recommended for students in Grades 11-12. Students may be awarded two to three credits per year for one to two years for the successful completion of this course. Instruction may be delivered through school-based pre-employment laboratory training or through work-based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, preceptorships, mentoring, and job shadowing. The two recommended prerequisites for this course are: Child Development, Nutrition and Food Science.

(b) Introduction. Knowledge and skills related to child growth and development equip individuals to develop positive relationships with children and effective parenting and caregiver skills. Individuals use these skills to promote the well-being and healthy development of children, strengthen families in a culturally diverse society, and pursue careers related to the care and education of children.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Business management procedures. The student determines effective business management procedures for the child care industry. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze licensing and accreditation standards;

(B) adhere to minimum standards, organization goals, policies, and procedures in the child care setting;

(C) demonstrate effective management skills; and

(D) identify the chain of command and responsibilities of each employee.

(2) Business management procedures. The student analyzes the components of a safe and sanitary environment. The student is expected to:

(A) evaluate safety and sanitation standards in a child care setting;

(B) practice emergency and evacuation procedures;

(C) demonstrate first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques; and

(D) summarize environmental conditions appropriate for a child care setting.

(3) Business management procedures. The student analyzes procedures for promoting health and wellness in the child care setting. The student is expected to:

(A) observe screening and other health assessment techniques;

(B) describe effective methods of recording health-related information;

(C) explain state law in reporting suspected child abuse;

(D) utilize appropriate procedures for reporting accidents;

(E) practice techniques that promote good health and safety in young children; and

(F) describe appropriate methods of administering and storing medications.

(4) Influences on child growth and development. The student analyzes factors affecting growth and development of young children. The student is expected to:

(A) explain how children progress through developmental stages;

(B) determine developmental differences in children of various ages;

(C) identify characteristics indicative of special needs or disabilities in children;

(D) explain influences on the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development of children;

(E) identify the effects of child abuse on the growth and development of young children; and

(F) determine how society, culture, and changing demographics affect the growth and development of young children.

(5) Influences on child growth and development. The student utilizes developmentally appropriate teaching strategies for young children. The student is expected to:

(A) apply the major learning theories when planning developmentally appropriate learning experiences for children;

(B) identify stimulating developmentally appropriate learning environments;

(C) demonstrate developmentally appropriate teaching methods and techniques;

(D) implement developmentally appropriate activities and lessons;

(E) develop appropriate adaptations of curriculum for children, including those with special needs;

(F) describe methods of assessing developmental levels of children;

(G) compare various observation techniques; and

(H) discuss the use of technology in teaching young children.

(6) Influences on child growth and development. The student evaluates the nutritional requirements and needs of young children. The student is expected to:

(A) determine the role of following food guidelines in promoting children's health;

(B) plan attractive nutritious snacks and meals;

(C) demonstrate safe and sanitary food handling practices;

(D) propose dietary modifications for special diet needs; and

(E) develop strategies for creating a relaxed mealtime routine.

(7) Interactions impacting behavioral development. The student appraises various guidance techniques utilized with children. The student is expected to:

(A) determine developmentally appropriate practices that promote self-discipline;

(B) practice effective communication skills;

(C) evaluate appropriate techniques to assist children in their adjustment to a child care setting;

(D) set up guidelines for assisting children with routine activities;

(E) propose developmentally appropriate practices that promote children's respect for diversity;

(F) identify guidance strategies for promoting positive behavior in children;

(G) describe guidance strategies for dealing with children's problems; and

(H) determine appropriate techniques when guiding children, including those with special needs.

(8) Interactions impacting behavioral development. The student analyzes behavior in children resulting from various family situations. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the impact of family beliefs, customs, and culture on children's behavior;

(B) explain how diversity of family units and roles may be reflected in a child's behavior;

(C) describe the impact of family crises on children and family;

(D) identify roles of family members in supporting children during crises;

(E) analyze the effect of family stability on children's behavior; and

(F) describe how child abuse affects behavior.

(9) Interactions impacting behavioral development. The student determines appropriate procedures to promote active parental involvement in the child care setting. The student is expected to:

(A) identify needs and opportunities for parental involvement in the child care setting;

(B) practice effective communication techniques that promote parental involvement; and

(C) implement strategies that enhance cooperation among the center, teacher, community, and family.

(10) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills that lead to job success in the child care industry. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(B) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(C) demonstrate positive interpersonal skills including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership;

(D) evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and achievement;

(E) demonstrate appropriate grooming and appearance for the workplace;

(F) demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette in the workplace; and

(G) exhibit productive work habits and attitudes.

(11) Career preparation. The student determines employment opportunities and preparation requirements in the child care industry. The student is expected to:

(A) determine preparation requirements for various levels of employment in a variety of child care and early childhood education careers;

(B) analyze the future employment outlook in the child care industry;

(C) describe entrepreneurial opportunities in the child care industry;

(D) determine how interests, abilities, personal priorities, and family responsibilities affect career choice;

(E) compare rewards and demands for various levels of employment in a variety of careers; and

(F) determine continuing education opportunities that enhance career advancement and promote lifelong learning.

(12) Career preparation. The student demonstrates ethical and legal practices for careers in the child care industry. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees;

(B) exhibit ethical practices as defined by industry standards;

(C) discuss legislation and public policies affecting the child care profession; and

(D) summarize legal aspects of the child care and guidance, management, and services industry.

(13) Career preparation. The student analyzes the management of multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze challenges of managing multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles; and

(B) exhibit management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple roles.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.34 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

Chapter 122. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education

Subchapter E. Nutrition and Wellness, Food Science and Technology; High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter E issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

122.41. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education, Nutrition and Wellness, Food Science and Technology; High School.

The provisions of Chapter 122, Subchapters B-K, shall supersede 75.83 of this title (relating to Vocational Home Economics) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.41 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.42. Nutrition and Food Science (One-Half Credit).

(a) General requirements. This technical laboratory course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction. Principles of food science, technology, and nutrition are interdependent with growth, development, health, and wellness. Individuals utilize these principles to make informed choices, promote good health, and pursue careers related to food science, technology, and nutrition.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Principles of nutrition. The student utilizes information about the basic principles of nutrition to promote healthy food choices. The student is expected to:

(A) define commonly used terms related to nutrition, health, and wellness;

(B) identify the nutrients, their functions, and food sources;

(C) compare the nutritive value of various foods;

(D) describe effects of nutritional intake on health, appearance, effective job performance, and personal life; and

(E) explain the relationship of activity levels and calorie intake to health and wellness, including weight management.

(2) Principles of nutrition. The student determines the relationship of nutrition to individual and family health. The student is expected to:

(A) outline strategies for prevention, treatment, and management of diet-related diseases and eating disorders;

(B) explain the relationship of nutrition and stress;

(C) summarize local, state, and federal legislation and policies pertaining to nutrition and health;

(D) assess long-term effects of food choices; and

(E) discuss food allergies and intolerances.

(3) Nutritionally-balanced diets. The student utilizes various dietary guidelines in making wise food choices. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the food pyramid and various dietary guidelines;

(B) compare recommended dietary allowances (RDA) throughout the life cycle;

(C) set goals for good eating habits; and

(D) apply dietary guidelines to meet nutritional needs throughout the life cycle.

(4) Nutritionally-balanced diets. The student analyzes nutritional adequacy of selected diets utilizing available technology. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the reliability of nutrition information;

(B) evaluate nutritive supplements;

(C) assess nutritional needs of persons at various activity levels;

(D) use available technology to compare personal food intake to recommended guidelines;

(E) interpret nutrition assessment data from available technology; and

(F) utilize decision-making skills to improve eating habits, exercise, and management of optimum weight.

(5) Influences on food choices. The student evaluates influences on food choices. The student is expected to:

(A) identify ways food satisfies psychological and social needs;

(B) discuss the role peer pressure and media play in food selections;

(C) describe family eating patterns;

(D) compare past, current, and future family eating patterns;

(E) determine environmental influences on food choices;

(F) propose ways nutritional needs may be met by individuals in self-care, including children, older adults, and persons with special needs; and

(G) evaluate the most efficient use of fast foods and convenience foods as nutrition sources.

(6) Influences on food choices. The student exhibits an awareness of the variety of food choices available in our multicultural society. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze food customs of the community;

(B) explain the integral role food plays in family traditions, special occasions, religious events, and holiday celebrations;

(C) adjust traditional recipes to improve nutritional quality; and

(D) determine the effects of regional agriculture and technology on food choices.

(7) Food management skills. The student applies management principles in meeting nutritional needs. The student is expected to:

(A) describe a variety of consumer food-buying strategies;

(B) analyze the influence of advertising on consumer buying;

(C) read and interpret food labels;

(D) relate the effects of work space, tools, equipment, and technology on food preparation;

(E) determine ways family members assuming multiple roles can apply food management skills;

(F) analyze food costs and budgeting needs;

(G) design a variety of daily menus; and

(H) determine how technological advancements have impacted the nutritional value of foods.

(8) Food management skills. The student demonstrates safety and sanitation procedures. The student is expected to:

(A) identify potential safety and sanitation hazards;

(B) demonstrate safe and sanitary practices in the use, care, and storage of tools and equipment;

(C) describe food storage principles; and

(D) demonstrate safety and sanitation practices when handling, storing, preparing, and serving food.

(9) Food management skills. The student prepares and serves nutritious foods. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate skills and procedures in applying principles of food preparation;

(B) prepare nutritious foods appropriate for individuals, families, and small groups;

(C) practice etiquette, food presentation, and table service appropriate for specific situations; and

(D) participate as an effective team member by demonstrating cooperation and responsibility.

(10) Career preparation. The student determines opportunities and preparation requirements for careers in nutrition and the food industry. The student is expected to:

(A) determine employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements for careers in the nutrition and the food industry;

(B) compare personal characteristics to those needed for careers in nutrition and the food industry; and

(C) propose short-term and long-term career goals.

(11) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles;

(B) practice positive human-relations skills;

(C) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(D) demonstrate effective techniques to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(E) identify ethical practices in the workplace; and

(F) practice problem solving using leadership and teamwork skills.

(12) Career preparation. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of nutrition and food science. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of nutrition and food science; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies developed in the study of nutrition and food science.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.42 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.43. Food Science and Technology (One-Half Credit).

(a) General requirements. This technical laboratory course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Nutrition and Food Science.

(b) Introduction. Principles of food science, technology, and nutrition are interdependent with growth, development, health, and wellness. Individuals utilize these principles to make informed choices, promote good health, and pursue careers related to food science, technology, and nutrition.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Food science principles. The student relates nutritional adequacy to personal health. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the functions of nutrients in the body;

(B) analyze the relationship of nutrients and other factors to diet-related diseases and disorders;

(C) relate cultural food patterns to personal health; and

(D) analyze culturally diverse food choices that are nutritionally adequate.

(2) Food science principles. The student analyzes ways to maximize quality nutrition. The student is expected to:

(A) determine various methods for retaining nutrients and improving nutrient content in foods; and

(B) describe the impact of new technology on food science.

(3) Food science principles. The student evaluates a variety of changes, including chemical and physical, that affect food product quality. The student is expected to:

(A) apply science process skills in conducting laboratory activities;

(B) explain the chemical reactions that occur during food processing;

(C) compare the effects of various cooking utensils and equipment on food products;

(D) evaluate the effect of various temperatures, manipulative procedures, and leavening agents on food products; and

(E) apply the principles of food preparation to preserve quality and nutritive value of foods.

(4) Nutrition and health. The student uses knowledge of digestion and metabolism to establish lifelong habits of good nutrition and physical fitness. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the processes of digestion and metabolism;

(B) explain basal and activity metabolisms and factors that affect each; and

(C) apply knowledge of digestion and metabolism when making decisions related to food intake and physical fitness.

(5) Nutrition and health. The student utilizes available technology to plan diets appropriate for long-term health and wellness. The student is expected to:

(A) plan diets appropriate to life cycle, activity level, culture, gender, and food budget;

(B) develop examples of therapeutic diets;

(C) explain consequences of eating disorders on long-term health;

(D) devise strategies to deal with special dietary considerations including needs of women during pregnancy and lactation; and

(E) utilize various guidelines and technology in evaluating diets.

(6) Nutrition and health. The student evaluates resources in nutrition and food science. The student is expected to:

(A) evaluate resources that provide reliable nutrition information; and

(B) propose ways to disseminate reliable nutrition information.

(7) Food technology. The student evaluates technologies used in food processing and product development. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize new research and trends;

(B) assess methods of food processing and their impact on product quality and nutrition;

(C) explain the roles of additives in food processing; and

(D) contrast the effects of packaging on the properties and quality of the food and on the environment.

(8) Food technology. The student evaluates safety and sanitation standards. The student is expected to:

(A) describe properties of microorganisms that cause food spoilage and food-borne illness;

(B) outline sanitation and food-handling practices that can help prevent food contamination and food-borne illness;

(C) describe functions of government agencies that regulate food quality, wholesomeness, and safety; and

(D) analyze industry quality control standards and skills related to safety and safe working conditions.

(9) Food technology. The student differentiates the effects of technology on nutrition, the food supply, marketing, and distribution. The student is expected to:

(A) determine the effects of technological advances on food availability;

(B) interpret how consumer choice is influenced by market research and marketing in the field of food science and nutrition;

(C) summarize the relationship of entrepreneurial opportunities, technological advances, and marketing research; and

(D) determine the effects of advancements in food science and technology on family strengths and the welfare of family members.

(10) Food technology. The student utilizes research skills in conducting and evaluating scientific research in food science. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze various research methods used in food science, technology, and nutrition;

(B) describe ways to choose topics for research in food science, technology, and nutrition;

(C) evaluate research projects related to a current issue in food science, technology, and nutrition; and

(D) utilize research methods to create projects related to a current issue in food science, technology, and nutrition.

(11) World food supply. The student contrasts basic physical survival with quality of life. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the relationship of good health and nutrition to job performance and relationships;

(B) explain the relationship of the food supply to quality of life;

(C) explain how the long-term effects of hunger affect a society and world progress; and

(D) contrast the nutrition in developed and developing countries.

(12) World food supply. The student analyzes food supply, distribution, and nutrition from a global perspective. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze factors that influence the food chain, pricing, and choices;

(B) determine the demands placed on food science and technology by American societal patterns;

(C) describe technological, ecological, and sociological factors affecting world food supply;

(D) explain the roles that world food trade policies and governments play in world progress related to nutrition;

(E) describe international organizations dealing with world food supply and contributing to improved nutrition;

(F) analyze the problems of world hunger; and

(G) predict possible solutions to the problems of world hunger.

(13) Career preparation. The student determines opportunities and preparation requirements for careers in nutrition, food science, and food technology. The student is expected to:

(A) determine employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements for careers in nutrition, food science, and technology;

(B) compare personal characteristics to those needed for careers in nutrition, food science, and technology; and

(C) propose short-term and long-term career goals.

(14) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles;

(B) practice positive human-relations skills;

(C) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(D) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(E) identify ethical practices in the workplace; and

(F) practice problem solving, using leadership and teamwork skills.

(15) Career preparation. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of food science and technology. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of food science and technology; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies developed in the study of food science and technology.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.43 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

Chapter 122. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education

Subchapter F. Hospitality, High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter F issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

122.51. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education, Hospitality, High School.

The provisions of Chapter 122, Subchapters B-K, shall supersede 75.83 of this title (relating to Vocational Home Economics) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.51 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.52. Food Production, Management, and Services (Two to Three Credits).

(a) General requirements. This course provides occupationally specific training and is recommended for students in Grades 11-12. Students may be awarded two to three credits per year for one to two years for the successful completion of this course. Instruction may be delivered through school-based pre-employment laboratory training or through work-based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, preceptorships, mentoring, and job shadowing. The two recommended prerequisites for this course are: Nutrition and Food Science, Food Science and Technology.

(b) Introduction. The hospitality industry encompasses lodging, foodservice, and institutional services and boasts the largest national employment base in the private sector. Individuals utilize knowledge and skills that meet industry standards to function effectively in various positions within this multifaceted industry.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Food production and service industry. The student describes the structure of the food production and service industry. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the organizational structure of food production and service systems;

(B) describe market segments in the food production and service industry;

(C) analyze societal, cultural, ethnic, demographic, and economic factors affecting the food production and service industry;

(D) analyze the impact of technological innovations on the food production and service industry;

(E) summarize the roles and services of professional organizations serving the food production and service industry; and

(F) predict changes in the food production and service industry for the future.

(2) Food production and service industry. The student implements organizational goals, policies, and procedures of food production, management, and services. The student is expected to:

(A) identify policies related to wages, benefits, and performance of employees;

(B) evaluate considerations and accommodations for employees and customers with special needs;

(C) summarize the goals and mission of various food production and service organizations; and

(D) analyze the relationship of multicultural awareness to target markets and customer services.

(3) Food production and service industry. The student relates management functions to food production and services operations and organizational structure. The student is expected to:

(A) contrast various ownership and management structures in the food production and service industry;

(B) describe various types of food production and service operations;

(C) explain management functions in food production and service operations;

(D) explain components of a strategic business plan;

(E) analyze styles of supervision;

(F) analyze issues affecting management of human resources; and

(G) practice effective management of resources.

(4) Food production and service industry. The student describes the organization and functions of foodservice establishments. The student is expected to:

(A) describe types of establishments in commercial foodservice;

(B) describe forms of service utilized in foodservice establishments for presenting food to guests;

(C) explain the relationship of concept, market segment, menu, and theme in commercial foodservice;

(D) distinguish types of restaurant ownership;

(E) describe services to segments of the institutional foodservice industry; and

(F) explain how the menu reflects the foodservice plan for meeting customer needs and wants.

(5) Food production and service industry. The student utilizes marketing strategies for the food production and service industry. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze various types of marketing strategies;

(B) describe the roles of public relations and publicity in the food production and service industry;

(C) explain the types of direct marketing materials;

(D) explain the use of special events and promotions in the food production and service industry; and

(E) apply available technological innovations utilized in the food production and service industry to enhance sales and marketing strategies.

(6) Food production and service industry. The student describes legal considerations of the food production and service industry. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize legislation, government regulations, and public policy affecting the food production and service industry;

(B) describe considerations regarding liability for injuries or damages to customers, employees, or facilities; and

(C) interpret laws and policies pertaining to food production and service establishments.

(7) Food production, foodservice, and quality assurance. The student demonstrates safe and efficient employee and workplace practices in the food production and service industry. The student is expected to:

(A) determine employer and employee responsibilities for workplace safety;

(B) evaluate regulations and standards guiding safety in the food production and service industry;

(C) identify major causes of accidents and ways to prevent them;

(D) demonstrate emergency first aid procedures;

(E) follow employer policies for handling emergencies;

(F) analyze the division of workplace responsibilities;

(G) use appropriate terminology related to the food production and service industry; and

(H) implement appropriate work-simplification procedures when performing assigned tasks.

(8) Food production, foodservice, and quality assurance. The student practices effective food safety and sanitation techniques in food production and service operations. The student is expected to:

(A) comply with government regulations and policies that apply to food safety and sanitation techniques utilized in food production and service;

(B) practice correct sanitation procedures in food production and service operations;

(C) describe food-borne illnesses, their causes, and prevention methods;

(D) explain the implications of temperature on the storage, preparation, and handling of food;

(E) follow appropriate procedures for the acquisition, preparation, handling, and storage of food and supplies;

(F) maintain acceptable standards in employee grooming, health, and hygiene;

(G) utilize procedures that protect the environment; and

(H) describe environmental factors affecting safe food production.

(9) Food production, foodservice, and quality assurance. The student demonstrates skills and techniques needed for quality food production. The student is expected to:

(A) utilize effective planning strategies for food production operations;

(B) analyze the relationship of effective menu planning to successful food production operations;

(C) practice cost control techniques in food production operations;

(D) demonstrate appropriate use, care, and maintenance of tools, utensils, and equipment utilized in food production;

(E) utilize appropriate techniques for preparation and presentation in food production operations according to industry standards;

(F) follow standardized recipes utilized in food production;

(G) apply nutrition principles in planning, preparation, and presentation for food production operations;

(H) describe food preparation strategies for meeting special dietary requirements;

(I) describe food production skills, procedures, and techniques utilized in catering and other specialized food production operations;

(J) perform appropriate tasks in food production according to industry standards; and

(K) apply available technology in food production.

(10) Food production, foodservice, and quality assurance. The student utilizes effective procedures for achieving quality standards in foodservice operations. The student is expected to:

(A) describe roles and responsibilities in foodservice operations;

(B) analyze personal qualities and skills required of foodservice employees;

(C) utilize appropriate techniques for presentation and service in foodservice operations according to industry standards;

(D) select equipment and utensils appropriate for prescribed tasks;

(E) perform appropriate tasks in foodservice according to industry standards;

(F) practice cost control techniques in foodservice operations; and

(G) apply available technology in foodservice.

(11) Food production, foodservice, and quality assurance. The student practices positive techniques for maintaining client relationships, customer satisfaction, and customer service. The student is expected to:

(A) identify potential clients and their foodservice needs;

(B) compare various ways of building and maintaining client-based services;

(C) analyze various companies' practices regarding customer satisfaction;

(D) apply techniques that promote customer service and satisfaction;

(E) utilize strategies for complaint resolution;

(F) demonstrate friendly customer service;

(G) evaluate criteria affecting quality service; and

(H) implement quality assurance standards in all aspects of the food production and service industry.

(12) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills that lead to job success in food production, management, and services. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(B) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(C) demonstrate positive interpersonal skills including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership;

(D) evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and achievement;

(E) demonstrate appropriate grooming and appearance for the workplace;

(F) demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette in the workplace; and

(G) exhibit productive work habits and attitudes.

(13) Career preparation. The student determines employment opportunities and preparation requirements in food production, management, and services. The student is expected to:

(A) determine preparation requirements for various levels of employment in a variety of food production, management, and services careers;

(B) analyze the future employment outlook in food production, management, and services;

(C) describe entrepreneurial opportunities in food production, management, and services;

(D) determine how interests, abilities, personal priorities, and family responsibilities affect career choice;

(E) compare rewards and demands for various levels of employment in a variety of careers; and

(F) determine continuing education opportunities that enhance career advancement and promote lifelong learning.

(14) Career preparation. The student demonstrates ethical practices in food production, management, and service careers. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees; and

(B) exhibit ethical practices as defined by the food production and service industry.

(15) Career preparation. The student analyzes the management of multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze challenges of managing multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles; and

(B) exhibit management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple roles.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.52 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.53. Hospitality Services (Two to Three Credits).

(a) General requirements. This course provides occupationally specific training and is recommended for students in Grades 11-12. Students may be awarded two to three credits per year for one to two years for the successful completion of this course. Instruction may be delivered through school-based pre-employment laboratory training or through work-based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, preceptorships, mentoring, and job shadowing. The two recommended prerequisites for this course are: Nutrition and Food Science, Food Science and Technology.

(b) Introduction. The hospitality industry encompasses lodging, foodservice, and institutional services and boasts the largest national employment base in the private sector. Individuals utilize knowledge and skills that meet industry standards to function effectively in various positions within this multifaceted industry.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Hospitality industry orientation. The student analyzes the hospitality industry from past, present, and future perspectives. The student is expected to:

(A) outline the history of the hospitality industry;

(B) explain the complexity and diversity of the current hospitality industry;

(C) analyze the impact of societal, cultural, and demographic trends on the hospitality industry;

(D) evaluate considerations and accommodations for employees and guests with special needs;

(E) analyze the effects of the global economy on the hospitality industry;

(F) describe the impact of technological innovations on the hospitality industry;

(G) summarize the roles and services of professional organizations serving the hospitality industry; and

(H) predict future changes in the hospitality industry.

(2) Hospitality industry orientation. The student incorporates the concept of service in work roles within the hospitality industry. The student is expected to:

(A) identify service as a strategic component of an employee's behavior in the hospitality industry;

(B) analyze service methods that fulfill needs of guests and customers;

(C) demonstrate types of service required of "front of the house" and "back of the house" employees;

(D) evaluate the relationship between employee responses and guest satisfaction;

(E) assess quality service in various work roles; and

(F) utilize strategies for complaint resolution.

(3) Hospitality industry orientation. The student relates management functions to property operation and organizational structure. The student is expected to:

(A) describe various types of hospitality operations;

(B) contrast various ownership and management structures in the hospitality industry;

(C) explain management functions related to operations in the hospitality industry;

(D) explain components of a strategic business plan; and

(E) analyze styles of supervision.

(4) Hospitality industry orientation. The student describes legal considerations of the hospitality industry. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize legislation, government regulations, and public policy affecting the hospitality industry;

(B) describe considerations regarding liability for injuries or damages to guests, employees, or property; and

(C) explain liability related to guest privacy.

(5) Hospitality industry orientation. The student demonstrates ethical practices for careers in hospitality services. The student is expected to:

(A) outline the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees;

(B) demonstrate ethical practices as defined by industry standards; and

(C) discuss ethical considerations impacted by technological innovations.

(6) Lodging. The student analyzes the structure of the lodging industry. The student is expected to:

(A) explain classifications of lodging properties by affiliation, levels of service, ownership, size, and target market;

(B) describe types of lodging properties based on market segment;

(C) describe the market price level classification of lodging properties;

(D) summarize the goals and mission of various lodging organizations;

(E) differentiate revenue centers and support centers in lodging operations; and

(F) analyze the relationship of multicultural awareness to target markets and guest services.

(7) Lodging. The student performs appropriate work roles within the rooms division. The student is expected to:

(A) describe roles and responsibilities of the departments within the rooms division;

(B) exhibit personal qualities and skills required of employees within each department;

(C) describe specific duties of employees in various departments;

(D) perform appropriate tasks according to industry standards; and

(E) apply available technological innovations to operations within the rooms division.

(8) Support operations. The student performs appropriate work roles within the sales and marketing division. The student is expected to:

(A) describe roles and responsibilities of the departments within the sales and marketing divisions;

(B) display personal qualities and skills required of employees within each department;

(C) describe specific duties of employees in various departments;

(D) perform appropriate tasks according to industry standards;

(E) compare various marketing methods utilized in the hospitality industry; and

(F) apply technological innovations to facilitate sales and marketing division operations.

(9) Support operations. The student performs appropriate work roles within the human resources division. The student is expected to:

(A) describe functions of the human resources division;

(B) exhibit personal qualities and skills required of employees within the human resources division;

(C) describe specific duties of employees in the human resources division;

(D) perform appropriate tasks according to industry standards;

(E) analyze issues affecting human resources management; and

(F) apply available technological innovations to operations within the human resources division.

(10) Support operations. The student performs appropriate work roles within the accounting division. The student is expected to:

(A) describe functions of the accounting division;

(B) exhibit personal qualities and skills required of employees within the accounting division;

(C) describe specific duties of employees in the accounting division;

(D) perform appropriate tasks according to industry standards;

(E) analyze the relationship between the front office and the accounting division; and

(F) apply available technological innovations to operations within the accounting division.

(11) Support operations. The student performs appropriate work roles within the security division. The student is expected to:

(A) describe roles and responsibilities of the security division;

(B) exhibit personal qualities and skills required of employees within the security division;

(C) describe specific duties of employees in the security division;

(D) perform appropriate tasks according to industry standards;

(E) determine security policies and training used in lodging operations;

(F) analyze the relationship between the security division and front desk operations;

(G) outline procedures for the safety and security of guests and employees; and

(H) apply available technological innovations to operations within the security division.

(12) Support operations. The student performs appropriate work roles within the engineering division. The student is expected to:

(A) describe functions of the engineering division;

(B) exhibit personal qualities and skills required of employees within the engineering division;

(C) describe specific duties of employees in the engineering division;

(D) perform appropriate tasks according to industry standards;

(E) analyze the relationship between the engineering division and front desk operations; and

(F) apply available technological innovations to operations within the engineering division.

(13) Food and beverage. The student analyzes the structure of the foodservice industry. The student is expected to:

(A) distinguish between commercial and institutional foodservice;

(B) describe market segments in the foodservice industry;

(C) identify food and beverage operations within businesses;

(D) describe the different food and beverage operations within lodging properties; and

(E) apply available technological innovations to food and beverage operations.

(14) Food and beverage. The student performs appropriate work roles in food and beverage operations. The student is expected to:

(A) describe roles and responsibilities in food and beverage operations;

(B) exhibit personal qualities and skills required of foodservice employees;

(C) perform appropriate tasks according to industry standards;

(D) apply management principles in work roles related to food and beverage operations;

(E) apply nutrition principles in food and beverage planning, preparation, and presentation;

(F) utilize appropriate techniques for preparation, presentation, and service in food and beverage operations;

(G) select equipment and utensils appropriate for prescribed tasks;

(H) summarize government regulations affecting food safety and sanitation;

(I) practice safety and sanitation procedures in food and beverage operations; and

(J) explain approaches that protect the environment.

(15) Food and beverage. The student explains the organization and functions of foodservice establishments. The student is expected to:

(A) describe types of establishments in commercial foodservice;

(B) describe forms of service utilized in food and beverage operations;

(C) explain the relationship of concept, market segment, menu, and theme in commercial foodservice;

(D) distinguish types of restaurant ownership;

(E) describe services to segments of the institutional foodservice industry;

(F) explain how the menu reflects the foodservice plan for meeting customer needs and wants; and

(G) evaluate criteria affecting quality of service.

(16) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills that lead to job success in the hospitality services industry. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(B) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(C) demonstrate positive interpersonal skills including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership;

(D) evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and achievement;

(E) demonstrate appropriate grooming and appearance for the workplace;

(F) demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette in the workplace; and

(G) exhibit productive work habits and attitudes.

(17) Career preparation. The student determines employment opportunities and preparation requirements in the hospitality services industry. The student is expected to:

(A) determine preparation requirements for various levels of employment in a variety of careers in the hospitality services industry;

(B) analyze the future employment outlook in the hospitality services industry;

(C) describe entrepreneurial opportunities in the hospitality services industry;

(D) determine how interests, abilities, personal priorities, and family responsibilities affect career choice;

(E) compare rewards and demands for various levels of employment in a variety of careers; and

(F) determine continuing education opportunities that enhance career advancement and promote lifelong learning.

(18) Career preparation. The student analyzes the management of multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze challenges of managing multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles; and

(B) exhibit management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple roles.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.53 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.54. Institutional Maintenance Management and Services (Two to Three Credits).

(a) General requirements. This course provides occupationally specific training and is recommended for students in Grades 11-12. Students may be awarded two to three credits per year for one to two years for the successful completion of this course. Instruction may be delivered through school-based pre-employment laboratory training or through work-based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, preceptorships, mentoring, and job shadowing. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Management.

(b) Introduction. The hospitality industry encompasses lodging, foodservice, and institutional services and boasts the largest national employment base in the private sector. Individuals utilize knowledge and skills that meet industry standards to function effectively in various positions within this multifaceted industry.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Institutional maintenance management. The student demonstrates routine practices and procedures related to institutional maintenance. The student is expected to:

(A) identify routine maintenance practices of a specific business;

(B) explain the organizational structure of a specific business;

(C) adhere to company policies and procedures;

(D) determine societal, cultural, and demographic factors influencing institutional maintenance practices and procedures; and

(E) describe institutional maintenance practices to accommodate employees or others with special needs.

(2) Institutional maintenance management. The student determines characteristics of effective managers and supervisors. The student is expected to:

(A) evaluate management styles;

(B) analyze leadership responsibilities;

(C) identify fiscal management responsibilities; and

(D) explain the role of management in compliance with local, state, and federal laws and policies.

(3) Institutional maintenance management. The student demonstrates effective techniques for maintaining client relationships. The student is expected to:

(A) assess characteristics of positive client relationships;

(B) describe how societal and cultural patterns influence communication;

(C) discuss issues of confidentiality, respect, and acceptance that impact client relations; and

(D) differentiate marketing and public relations plans effective for various types of operations.

(4) Sanitation and safety. The student applies safety and sanitation techniques when performing assigned tasks. The student is expected to:

(A) evaluate potential safety hazards in the workplace;

(B) practice procedures that contribute to safe working conditions;

(C) apply safety and sanitation procedures when performing assigned tasks; and

(D) analyze government regulations impacting safety and sanitation practices in institutional maintenance operations.

(5) Sanitation and safety. The student exhibits practices that promote environmental protection and employee health and safety. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate safe and responsible storage, use, and disposal of materials;

(B) describe environmental issues specific to an assigned workplace; and

(C) demonstrate appropriate responses to emergency situations.

(6) Institutional maintenance procedures. The student applies required methods and sequences in performing assigned tasks. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze principles of time management and work-simplification when performing assigned tasks;

(B) demonstrate how to function effectively when performing routine procedures and practices related to specific businesses; and

(C) predict the impact of effective time management and work simplification on the cost of institutional maintenance.

(7) Institutional maintenance procedures. The student utilizes appropriate equipment, supplies, and procedures for completion of assigned tasks. The student is expected to:

(A) develop guidelines for selecting equipment, supplies, and procedures for assigned tasks;

(B) apply appropriate procedures while operating equipment and using tools and products in the performance of assigned tasks;

(C) describe the impact of technology on equipment, supplies, and procedures utilized in the industry;

(D) describe appropriate procedures for completing a variety of tasks involved in institutional maintenance;

(E) demonstrate correct procedures for displaying flags; and

(F) predict institutional maintenance cost variances based on material, surface, and furnishing considerations.

(8) Institutional maintenance procedures. The student applies appropriate procedures for cleaning and sanitizing guest and patient rooms. The student is expected to:

(A) exhibit work simplification techniques and prescribed procedures for specific cleaning tasks;

(B) determine appropriate responses in accommodating guest and patient requests;

(C) apply safe and sanitary techniques when handling soiled linens and disposable materials;

(D) describe appropriate respect and care for personal property of guests and patients; and

(E) apply recommended procedures for entering and exiting guest and patient rooms.

(9) Institutional maintenance procedures. The student performs laundry tasks in accordance with required procedures. The student is expected to:

(A) perform appropriate laundry tasks according to industry standards;

(B) compare a variety of laundry products and their suitability for specific uses;

(C) explain the importance of prelaundry procedures;

(D) differentiate the functions of thermal, mechanical, and chemical energy in laundry operations;

(E) describe procedures for appropriately folding, storing, mending, and recycling linens; and

(F) describe procedures for handling and cleaning contaminated linens.

(10) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills that lead to job success in institutional maintenance management and services. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(B) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(C) demonstrate positive interpersonal skills including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership;

(D) evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and achievement;

(E) demonstrate appropriate grooming and appearance for the workplace;

(F) demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette in the workplace; and

(G) exhibit productive work habits and attitudes.

(11) Career preparation. The student determines employment opportunities and preparation requirements in the institutional maintenance management and services industry. The student is expected to:

(A) determine preparation requirements for various levels of employment in a variety of institutional maintenance management and services careers;

(B) analyze the future employment outlook in the institutional maintenance management and services industry;

(C) describe entrepreneurial opportunities in institutional maintenance management and services;

(D) determine how interests, abilities, personal priorities, and family responsibilities affect career choice;

(E) compare rewards and demands for various levels of employment in a variety of careers;

(F) determine continuing education opportunities that enhance career advancement and promote lifelong learning;

(G) predict the impact of technological advancements on the institutional maintenance management and services industry; and

(H) analyze economic, cultural, and societal influences on the industry.

(12) Career preparation. The student demonstrates ethical and legal practices for careers in institutional maintenance management and services. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees;

(B) exhibit ethical practices as defined by the institutional maintenance management and services industry; and

(C) analyze legal aspects of the institutional maintenance management and services industry.

(13) Career preparation. The student analyzes the management of multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze challenges of managing multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles; and

(B) exhibit management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple roles.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.54 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

Chapter 122. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education

Subchapter G. Consumer and Resource Management, High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter G issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

122.61. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education, Consumer and Resource Management, High School.

The provisions of Chapter 122, Subchapters B-K, shall supersede 75.83 of this title (relating to Vocational Home Economics) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.61 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.62. Management (One-Half Credit).

(a) General requirements. This technical course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction. Consumer and resource management focuses on consumer practices and responsibilities, the management process, decision-making skills, career preparation, and the impact of technology on individual and family life. Individuals utilize acquired knowledge and skills to develop consumer and financial management expertise, occupational competence, and proficiency in managing multiple roles.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Management tools. The student utilizes the decision-making process to enhance the quality of life. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the various steps in the decision-making process;

(B) explain how personal decision making is affected by sociological, emotional, cultural, socioeconomic, and family influences;

(C) determine the role of responsibility and personal priorities in the decision-making process;

(D) describe the role of planning in effective utilization of the decision-making process; and

(E) utilize the decision-making process in solving problems and managing peer pressure.

(2) Management tools. The student applies the goal-setting process as a management tool. The student is expected to:

(A) identify various categories of goals;

(B) explain how goals change throughout the life cycle;

(C) analyze factors that influence goal setting;

(D) describe the role of planning in effective utilization of the goal-setting process; and

(E) utilize the goal-setting process.

(3) Management tools. The student demonstrates skills, characteristics, and responsibilities of leaders and effective team members. The student is expected to:

(A) utilize parliamentary procedure as a management tool; and

(B) practice problem solving through leadership and teamwork skills.

(4) Management of resources. The student applies effective practices for managing time, energy, and money resources. The student is expected to:

(A) create a daily time and work plan to accomplish goals;

(B) demonstrate strategies for effective time and energy management;

(C) determine the importance of time, energy, and money management;

(D) identify the components of money management;

(E) determine influences of societal, economic, and changing demographic factors on the management of time, energy, and money;

(F) describe the use of technology as a life management resource; and

(G) describe community resources enabling individuals to better manage time, energy, and money.

(5) Management of resources. The student distinguishes methods of personal risk management. The student is expected to:

(A) determine strategies for coping with financial emergencies;

(B) identify various types of insurance and their role in personal risk management; and

(C) analyze investment and retirement options and their role in personal risk management.

(6) Management of resources. The student utilizes effective environmental resource management practices. The student is expected to:

(A) identify environmental resources, issues, and preservation practices;

(B) determine the effect of environmental neglect on economics, health, safety, and quality of life;

(C) propose personal, family, and community strategies for preserving the environment; and

(D) demonstrate home and employment practices for preserving personal safety and the environment.

(7) Management of resources. The student determines effective strategies for human resource management. The student is expected to:

(A) identify examples of human resources;

(B) demonstrate the use of delegation and division of tasks as techniques for managing human resources; and

(C) determine strategies for managing human resources in personal, family, career, and community settings.

(8) Management of multiple roles. The student predicts the implications of assuming multiple roles within the life span. The student is expected to:

(A) identify roles common within the life span;

(B) analyze changes in personal and family priorities within the life span;

(C) summarize responsibilities and rewards of various roles;

(D) describe conflicts and challenges of managing multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles;

(E) determine how family life is impacted by the effectiveness of managing multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles; and

(F) determine how occupational performance is impacted by the effectiveness of managing multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles.

(9) Management of multiple roles. The student utilizes management techniques required when assuming multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles. The student is expected to:

(A) determine the effect of various community and career roles on personal and family life;

(B) analyze cultural influences on the management of multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles;

(C) propose management strategies for effectively managing multiple roles; and

(D) propose effective techniques for managing stress.

(10) Management of multiple roles. The student utilizes interpersonal skills in managing family, community, and wage-earner roles. The student is expected to:

(A) practice techniques for effective communication;

(B) determine the relationship of personal priorities to family and employment needs;

(C) utilize conflict resolution, assertiveness, and negotiation techniques; and

(D) determine ways that assertiveness, conflict resolution, and negotiation skills can be utilized in managing family, community, and wage-earner roles.

(11) Career preparation. The student analyzes components of responsible behavior. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze one's responsibilities to family, employer, community, and society;

(B) identify personal short-term and long-term goals that contribute to responsible behavior; and

(C) propose strategies for demonstrating personal responsibility through community service.

(12) Career preparation. The student analyzes management as an employability skill fundamental to all careers as well as being an occupational field itself. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the importance of effective management skills for enhancing job performance;

(B) determine employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements in the field of management;

(C) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(D) demonstrate effective techniques to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(E) practice positive human-relations skills;

(F) appraise the impact of technology on management career opportunities; and

(G) appraise the impact of societal, cultural, and changing demographic factors on management career opportunities.

(13) Career preparation. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of management. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of management; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies developed in the study of management.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.62 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.63. Consumer and Family Economics (One-Half Credit).

(a) General requirements. This technical course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction. Consumer and resource management focuses on consumer practices and responsibilities, the management process, decision-making skills, career preparation, and the impact of technology on individual and family life. Individuals utilize acquired knowledge and skills to develop consumer and financial management expertise, occupational competence, and proficiency in managing multiple roles.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Management of financial resources. The student incorporates the management process in financial planning to enhance economic security for individuals and families. The student is expected to:

(A) utilize the decision-making process in financial planning and management;

(B) determine the use of human and nonhuman resources in financial management;

(C) describe effects of individual and family priorities on financial decisions across the life span; and

(D) describe effects of cultural, demographic, and societal factors on family financial decisions.

(2) Management of financial resources. The student analyzes family economics throughout the family life cycle. The student is expected to:

(A) describe stages of the family life cycle;

(B) identify financial obligations and opportunities throughout the family life cycle;

(C) explain the effect of local, national, and global economics on families throughout the family life cycle;

(D) determine the influences of changing demographics on the family life cycle;

(E) analyze living costs such as housing, food, and transportation throughout the life cycle; and

(F) analyze the economic impact of crises on the family.

(3) Management of financial resources. The student determines the impact of technology as a financial management resource. The student is expected to:

(A) describe uses of technology for financial management processes;

(B) determine the impact of technology on marketing strategies and consumer fraud; and

(C) summarize uses of technology in communication and information access.

(4) Government, the economy, and societal issues. The student analyzes the role of government in personal and family economics. The student is expected to:

(A) identify local, state, and national government services affecting the consumer;

(B) assess current laws and the impact on rights and responsibilities of the consumer;

(C) describe consumer protection policies and practices;

(D) describe how the consumer is affected by tax laws and the U.S. economy; and

(E) explain the principle of "opportunity costs" and how it affects family financial decisions.

(5) Government, the economy, and societal issues. The student determines the impact of the U.S. economy on individuals and families. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize effects of the free enterprise system on families;

(B) analyze how family spending decisions are affected by competition, profit, and supply and demand; and

(C) determine how technology used in the banking and financial industry impacts the individual and family.

(6) Government, the economy, and societal issues. The student analyzes issues affecting consumers and the U.S. economy. The student is expected to:

(A) discuss the economic impact on consumers of legislation dealing with issues such as global markets, welfare, crime, and immigration; and

(B) analyze economic rights and responsibilities of individuals and families as consumers.

(7) Economic security. The student assesses factors affecting the production and use of income. The student is expected to:

(A) determine sources of income;

(B) describe effects of personal and family priorities and goals on income and financial planning;

(C) evaluate the effectiveness of financial planning in reflecting personal and family goals;

(D) summarize the effects of external economic influences on spending decisions; and

(E) determine the components of effective consumer buying.

(8) Economic security. The student explains the relationship of financial planning to economic security. The student is expected to:

(A) identify components of a budget;

(B) explain the functions, types, and services of financial institutions;

(C) identify savings and investment opportunities;

(D) relate insurance types to individual and family needs;

(E) explain the relationship between retirement planning and family financial security;

(F) compare sources and costs of credit;

(G) describe effective use of credit;

(H) develop an effective individual or family budget and record keeping system;

(I) utilize technology to examine personal financial management plans; and

(J) identify professional financial planning resources.

(9) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills transferable to multiple careers. The student is expected to:

(A) determine various careers compatible with personal characteristics, interests, and abilities;

(B) demonstrate verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(C) assess interpersonal skills and attitudes appropriate for the workplace;

(D) describe grooming, dress, and etiquette appropriate for the workplace;

(E) demonstrate skills, characteristics, and responsibilities of leaders and effective team members;

(F) analyze transferable financial and business management skills;

(G) determine continuing education opportunities that enhance career options, career advancement, and lifelong learning; and

(H) demonstrate effective techniques to secure, maintain, and terminate employment.

(10) Career preparation. The student analyzes career choices available in consumer and resource management. The student is expected to:

(A) determine employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements in the field of consumer and resource management;

(B) determine potential income, job availability, and geographical influences of career options;

(C) determine strategies for managing multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles; and

(D) utilize short-term and long-term career goals and career information to develop a personal career plan.

(11) Career preparation. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of consumer and family economics. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of consumer and family economics; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies developed in the study of consumer and family economics.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.63 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

Chapter 122. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education

Subchapter H. Textiles and Apparel, High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter H issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

122.71. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education, Textiles and Apparel, High School.

The provisions of Chapter 122, Subchapters B-K, shall supersede 75.83 of this title (relating to Vocational Home Economics) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.71 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.72. Apparel (One-Half Credit).

(a) General requirements. This technical laboratory course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction. The textile and apparel industries encompass the production, marketing, and consumption of textile and apparel products. Individuals use knowledge and skills to function effectively as consumers and in careers related to the textile and apparel industries.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Consumer skills. The student uses effective decision-making skills when selecting and purchasing apparel. The student is expected to:

(A) describe social, cultural, and life-cycle influences on apparel preferences and management;

(B) explain how patterns of living and the life cycle affect apparel choices and management;

(C) apply principles of effective wardrobe planning;

(D) explain fashion trends and how they are determined;

(E) analyze the influence of advertising on consumer apparel choices;

(F) describe the elements and principles of design and their influence on apparel purchases;

(G) evaluate textile products as to suitability for varied apparel uses; and

(H) determine apparel management techniques for individuals with special needs.

(2) Consumer skills. The student selects proper care and maintenance practices for apparel. The student is expected to:

(A) interpret labeling information to determine care procedures for apparel products;

(B) evaluate clothing-care products and equipment;

(C) determine proper equipment and/or services related to care, maintenance, and storage of apparel;

(D) identify proper safety procedures when using care products and equipment; and

(E) analyze the impact of clothing-care requirements on clothing selection and the clothing budget.

(3) Consumer skills. The student effectively manages the apparel dollar. The student is expected to:

(A) explain human and financial resources affecting individual and family clothing decisions;

(B) propose practices for effectively managing apparel and accessory costs, care, and maintenance in the individual and family budget;

(C) compare various sources for apparel purchases;

(D) predict the impact of technology on consumer apparel purchasing options; and

(E) develop ideas for recycling apparel.

(4) The apparel industry. The student evaluates factors influencing the apparel industry. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the interrelationship of the apparel industry to the U.S. and international economies;

(B) identify sources of textile and apparel products;

(C) explain the impact of labor laws;

(D) analyze factors that contribute to a safe working environment;

(E) summarize procedures within the apparel industry that protect the environment; and

(F) describe technological advancements influencing the apparel industry.

(5) The apparel industry. The student analyzes the influence of design elements and principles in apparel. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze application of the elements and principles of design in apparel; and

(B) describe the impact of technology on apparel design and production.

(6) The apparel industry. The student demonstrates effective repair, alteration, and production techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) describe principles of quality apparel construction;

(B) demonstrate appropriate use and care of equipment, tools, and notions;

(C) practice effective pressing, repair, and alteration;

(D) apply basic apparel production skills if training for a career in the apparel industry;

(E) utilize planning, organization, management, and sequencing when repairing, altering, and/or producing apparel; and

(F) determine apparel design and alterations to accommodate individuals with special needs.

(7) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills appropriate for careers in the apparel industry. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(B) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(C) practice positive human-relations skills; and

(D) demonstrate skills, characteristics, and responsibilities of leaders and effective team members.

(8) Career preparation. The student makes informed career decisions that reflect personal, family, and career goals. The student is expected to:

(A) evaluate employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements for careers in the apparel industry; and

(B) describe management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles.

(9) Career preparation. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of apparel. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of apparel; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies developed in the study of apparel.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.72 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.73. Textile and Apparel Design (One-Half Credit).

(a) General requirements. This technical laboratory course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Apparel.

(b) Introduction. The textile and apparel industries encompass the production, marketing, and consumption of textile and apparel products. Individuals use knowledge and skills to function effectively as consumers and in careers related to the textile and apparel industries.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The textile and apparel industries. The student utilizes knowledge of textile and apparel manufacturing systems. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize all aspects of the textile and apparel industries;

(B) identify the processes for apparel product completion;

(C) compare the organizational structures common in textile and apparel manufacturing;

(D) describe mass production techniques;

(E) describe industry standards for quality control;

(F) determine ethical practices within the textile and apparel industries; and

(G) describe factors that contribute to a safe working environment.

(2) The textile and apparel industries. The student evaluates textile and apparel product marketing techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) determine viable markets for textile and apparel products;

(B) describe textile and apparel product marketing strategies and how they affect the consumer;

(C) determine the impact of technology on marketing textile and apparel products; and

(D) describe cultural and societal influences on the promotion of textile and apparel products.

(3) Textile design and production. The student applies knowledge of fibers, fabrics, and design when evaluating textile products. The student is expected to:

(A) classify properties of fabrics;

(B) assess the elements and principles of design utilized in textile products;

(C) analyze characteristics of natural and manufactured fibers;

(D) describe methods of textile fabrication; and

(E) assess the effects of various environmental conditions on textiles.

(4) Textile design and production. The student evaluates manufacturing processes utilized in textile production. The student is expected to:

(A) compare processes for dyeing, printing, and finishing used in the textile industry;

(B) explain how finishes affect the characteristics of fabrics;

(C) determine textile suitability for specific applications and uses; and

(D) recommend care procedures for various textile products.

(5) Textile design and production. The student analyzes influences on textile design and production. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize the history of textile design and production;

(B) analyze the impact of technology on fiber production and textile design and manufacturing;

(C) summarize legislation affecting the import, export, and safe production of textile products;

(D) analyze international factors affecting the textile industry;

(E) explain demographic, societal, and cultural influences on the textile industry;

(F) determine the impact of design decisions on the cost of textile products; and

(G) determine the many applications of textile products beyond those related to the consumer apparel industry.

(6) Apparel design practices and influences. The student creates apparel products utilizing principles of effective design. The student is expected to:

(A) apply design elements and principles in creating apparel products;

(B) use design elements and principles to design products for individuals with special needs;

(C) determine factors impacting the selection of textiles for apparel creation;

(D) utilize draping and flat pattern methods for fitting a garment; and

(E) determine technology applications useful in the apparel design process.

(7) Apparel design practices and influences. The student determines design influences on the apparel industry. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize the history of apparel design;

(B) identify federal regulations affecting the apparel industry;

(C) explain the role of leading designers in determining fashion trends;

(D) analyze international factors affecting the apparel industry;

(E) analyze demographic, societal, and cultural factors affecting the apparel industry;

(F) determine the impact of technology on the apparel industry; and

(G) determine the impact of design decisions on the cost of apparel products.

(8) Career preparation. The student makes informed career decisions that reflect personal, family, and career goals. The student is expected to:

(A) describe management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles;

(B) determine employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements in the textile and apparel industries;

(C) demonstrate skills, characteristics, and responsibilities of leaders and effective team members;

(D) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(E) demonstrate effective techniques to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(F) practice positive human-relations skills; and

(G) evaluate the effect of careers in the textile and apparel industries on family life.

(9) Career preparation. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of textiles and apparel. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of textiles and apparel; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies developed in the study of textiles and apparel.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.73 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.74. Textile and Apparel Production, Management, and Services (Two to Three Credits).

(a) General requirements. This course provides occupationally specific training and is recommended for students in Grades 11-12. Students may be awarded two to three credits per year for one to two years for the successful completion of this course. Instruction may be delivered through school-based pre-employment laboratory training or through work-based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, preceptorships, mentoring, and job shadowing. The two recommended prerequisites for this course are: Apparel, Textile and Apparel Design.

(b) Training specialization options. All students training in Textile and Apparel Production, Management, and Services shall develop knowledge and skills described in subsection (d)(1)-(3) and (11)-(14) of this section. In addition, students are expected to develop knowledge and skills described in one of the following three training specialization options.

(1) Textile and apparel production. Students whose training emphasizes textile and apparel production are expected to develop knowledge and skills described in subsection (d)(4)-(6) of this section.

(2) Textile and apparel management and services. Students whose training emphasizes textile and apparel management and services are expected to develop knowledge and skills described in subsection (d)(4) and (8)-(10) of this section.

(3) Textile and apparel services. Students whose training emphasizes textile and apparel services shall develop knowledge and skills described in subsection (d)(6) and (7) of this section.

(c) Introduction. The textile and apparel industries encompass the production, marketing, and consumption of textile and apparel products. Individuals use knowledge and skills to function effectively as consumers and in careers related to the textile and apparel industries.

(d) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Textile and apparel production. The student adheres to organizational goals, policies, and procedures. The student is expected to:

(A) contrast the organizational structure of selected businesses in the textile and apparel industries;

(B) describe how goals, policies, and procedures influence business structures;

(C) relate the impact of organizational goals, policies, and procedures to each individual's job performance;

(D) explain the importance of scheduling in managing employee work assignments; and

(E) analyze demographic, economic, and societal factors influencing organizational goals, policies, and procedures.

(2) Textile and apparel production. The student performs routine operations for various roles in the textile and apparel industries. The student is expected to:

(A) identify routine tasks that employees may perform;

(B) follow procedures identified for performing tasks;

(C) apply resource management procedures when completing assigned tasks; and

(D) utilize safe and effective work habits, procedures, and time schedules for completing prescribed tasks.

(3) Textile and apparel production. The student determines the implications of textile characteristics and fabrication on textile and apparel products. The student is expected to:

(A) identify origins, properties, and qualities of natural and manufactured fibers;

(B) describe methods of fiber and yarn production;

(C) analyze the impact of technology on production of fibers, yarns, and fabrics;

(D) outline the textile design process from concept to finished product;

(E) differentiate types and methods of textile fabrication;

(F) summarize implications and methods of dyeing, printing, and finishing of textiles;

(G) determine textile and apparel labeling requirements; and

(H) determine factors affecting the cost of textile products.

(4) Textile and apparel production. The student analyzes the apparel production process from design concept to finished product. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze elements and principles of design as related to apparel;

(B) outline general procedures and equipment used in apparel design and pattern development;

(C) analyze factors to consider when selecting fabrics for garment design and production; and

(D) describe the impact of production and quality control systems on the worker, product costs, and quality.

(5) Textile and apparel production. The student creates quality apparel products. The student is expected to:

(A) describe types, uses, and care of equipment, tools, and supplies used in apparel production;

(B) demonstrate safety practices when completing apparel production tasks;

(C) determine uses of technology in apparel design and production;

(D) differentiate procedures and techniques appropriate for varied production systems to achieve quality apparel products; and

(E) utilize established production procedures and processes to achieve quality standards in finished products.

(6) Textile and apparel customization and care. The student uses appropriate techniques to alter, repair, and customize textile and apparel products according to quality standards. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate correct procedures utilized in garment fitting and alteration;

(B) describe characteristics of proper fit in garments;

(C) determine alterations to solve common fitting problems resulting from individual differences and special needs;

(D) describe types, use, and care of tools, equipment, and supplies used to alter, repair, and customize textile and apparel products;

(E) apply elements and principles of design in altering, repairing, and customizing textile and apparel products;

(F) utilize appropriate techniques and processes to alter, repair, and customize textile and apparel products according to quality standards; and

(G) demonstrate safety practices when completing tasks related to the alteration, repair, and customization of textile and apparel products.

(7) Textile and apparel customization and care. The student applies procedures for the commercial care of textiles and apparel to meet industry standards. The student is expected to:

(A) define terms commonly used in commercial textile and apparel care;

(B) explain how regulations pertaining to workplace safety, labor, and environmental issues affect the commercial textile and apparel care operation;

(C) apply effective safety and sanitation practices in textile and apparel care procedures;

(D) identify equipment and supplies and their uses in textiles and apparel;

(E) demonstrate proper selection, use, and care of equipment and products for cleaning, laundry, and pressing tasks;

(F) perform commercial care procedures for textile and apparel products in accordance with content and care label information;

(G) determine procedures for efficiently marking and tracking items in a commercial textile and apparel care operation;

(H) complete commercial textile and apparel care tasks according to industry standards; and

(I) analyze the impact of technology and societal patterns on commercial textile and apparel care operations.

(8) Textile and apparel business promotions. The student illustrates coordination of clothing and accessories. The student is expected to:

(A) describe factors considered when coordinating clothing and accessories;

(B) demonstrate coordination of clothing and accessories for various occasions; and

(C) summarize social, cultural, societal, and generational influences that affect clothing and accessory trends and choices.

(9) Textile and apparel business promotions. The student applies marketing techniques when assisting with promotional activities. The student is expected to:

(A) describe various types of business promotion strategies;

(B) classify types of customers and their motives for buying textile and apparel products;

(C) describe roles of public relations and publicity in product promotion; and

(D) explain the use of promotional activities to market textile and apparel products and services.

(10) Textile and apparel business promotions. The student creates product displays using the principles of design. The student is expected to:

(A) identify components used in developing displays;

(B) determine ways in which design elements and principles are used in the creation of displays;

(C) describe types and uses of interior and exterior displays; and

(D) create window or other displays of textile and apparel products.

(11) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills that lead to job success in the textile and apparel industries. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(B) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(C) demonstrate positive interpersonal skills including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership;

(D) evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and achievement;

(E) demonstrate appropriate grooming and appearance for the workplace;

(F) demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette in the workplace; and

(G) exhibit productive work habits and attitudes.

(12) Career preparation. The student determines employment opportunities and preparation requirements in the textile and apparel industries. The student is expected to:

(A) determine preparation requirements for various levels of employment in a variety of careers in the textile and apparel industries;

(B) analyze the future employment outlook in the textile and apparel industries;

(C) describe entrepreneurial opportunities in the textile and apparel industries;

(D) determine how interests, abilities, personal priorities, and family responsibilities affect career choice;

(E) compare rewards and demands for various levels of employment in a variety of careers;

(F) determine continuing education opportunities that enhance career advancement and promote lifelong learning;

(G) apply correct textile and apparel terminology;

(H) describe the size, scope, and importance of the textile and apparel industries; and

(I) describe the impact of international trade practice on the textile and apparel industries and on U.S. economics.

(13) Career preparation. The student demonstrates ethical and legal practices for careers in the textile and apparel industries. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees;

(B) exhibit ethical practices as defined by the textile and apparel industries; and

(C) analyze legal aspects of the textile and apparel industries.

(14) Career preparation. The student analyzes the management of multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze challenges of managing multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles; and

(B) exhibit management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple roles.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.74 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

Chapter 122. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education

Subchapter I. Environmental Design, High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter I issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

122.81. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education, Environmental Design, High School.

The provisions of Chapter 122, Subchapters B-K shall supersede 75.83 of this title (relating to Vocational Home Economics) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.81 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.82. Housing (One-Half Credit).

(a) General requirements. This technical laboratory course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction. Environmental design addresses psychological, physiological, and sociological needs of individuals by enhancing the environments in which they live and work. Individuals use knowledge and skills related to interior and exterior environments, construction, and furnishings to make wise consumer decisions, increase productivity, and compete in industry.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Management of housing needs. The student demonstrates effective decision-making skills related to housing needs throughout the life cycle. The student is expected to:

(A) determine housing characteristics common to various cultures and regions;

(B) describe factors affecting housing choices;

(C) describe the relationship of housing and family economics;

(D) assess the impact of demographic trends and psychological, physiological, and social needs on housing decisions;

(E) analyze the impact of housing decisions on family relationships and the management of multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles;

(F) analyze aspects of community planning that impact housing decisions; and

(G) compare the availability, desirability, and financial feasibility of housing alternatives.

(2) Management of housing needs. The student demonstrates effective management practices related to the housing budget. The student is expected to:

(A) explain consumer rights and responsibilities associated with housing;

(B) contrast the impact of needs and wants on the costs of housing;

(C) analyze legal and financial aspects of purchasing and leasing housing; and

(D) summarize laws and public policies that impact housing decisions and costs.

(3) Management of housing needs. The student recommends practices that will create a safe, secure, and well-maintained home. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the effect of housing conditions on health and safety;

(B) develop a plan for detecting safety hazards and maintaining a safe home; and

(C) describe housing features for individuals with special needs.

(4) Housing and environment. The student proposes methods to create quality living environments. The student is expected to:

(A) apply elements and principles of design to living environments;

(B) apply principles of space utilization, zoning, and traffic patterns in planning and furnishing housing; and

(C) propose design and furnishings features to meet the special needs of individuals and families.

(5) Housing and environment. The student considers factors affecting housing construction when making planning and consumer decisions related to housing. The student is expected to:

(A) identify architectural styles exemplified in housing;

(B) summarize considerations for housing site selection;

(C) evaluate basic housing construction and finishing considerations; and

(D) describe the effects of technology on current and future housing trends.

(6) Housing and environment. The student evaluates factors influencing the housing industry. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the interrelationship of the housing industry and the U.S. economy; and

(B) determine sources and availability of construction materials.

(7) Housing and environment. The student assesses environmental issues affecting housing. The student is expected to:

(A) evaluate the effects of landscaping on housing and the larger environment; and

(B) determine techniques, materials, and technology applications that can be used in housing to conserve energy and other resources.

(8) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(B) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(C) demonstrate ethical behavior and positive interpersonal skills including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership; and

(D) demonstrate skills, characteristics, and responsibilities of leaders and effective team members.

(9) Career preparation. The student makes informed career decisions that reflect personal, family, and career goals. The student is expected to:

(A) describe management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles;

(B) determine employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements in the housing industry;

(C) analyze the implications of housing careers on personal and family life;

(D) propose short-term and long-term career goals;

(E) determine the use of technology in personal and career applications related to housing; and

(F) assess factors that contribute to a safe working environment.

(10) Career preparation. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of housing. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of housing; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies developed in the study of housing.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.82 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.83. Interior Design (One-Half Credit).

(a) General requirements. This technical laboratory course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Housing.

(b) Introduction. Environmental design addresses psychological, physiological, and sociological needs of individuals by enhancing the environments in which they live and work. Individuals use knowledge and skills related to interior and exterior environments, construction, and furnishings to make wise consumer decisions, increase productivity, and compete in industry.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Interior environments. The student utilizes effective design practices to evaluate residential and nonresidential interiors. The student is expected to:

(A) apply elements and principles of design to interiors;

(B) plan for effective use of space zones and placement of furnishings;

(C) determine drafting techniques, including scaled drawings, that facilitate space planning;

(D) determine the effect of technology on interior design practices;

(E) differentiate design practices to meet individual, business, and special needs;

(F) describe energy conservation practices that affect interior design; and

(G) summarize laws, public policies, and regulations impacting interior environments.

(2) Interior environments. The student determines appropriate lighting for residential and nonresidential interiors. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the functions and principles of lighting;

(B) compare lighting types and methods of control; and

(C) recommend lighting applications for specific interior needs.

(3) Interior environments. The student chooses appropriate background materials to complement various residential and nonresidential interior settings. The student is expected to:

(A) compare criteria for selection, use, and care of floor coverings;

(B) evaluate selection, use, and care of wall treatments;

(C) explain selection and care of ceilings; and

(D) evaluate the selection, use, and care of window treatments and their suitability for various window types.

(4) Interior environments. The student demonstrates effective decision-making skills in applying principles of design and space to residential and nonresidential interior environments. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the relationship of interior decisions to individual and family needs and wants;

(B) describe the influences of demographics, society, and culture on interior design decisions;

(C) explain the relationship of economics to interior environments; and

(D) propose strategies for controlling costs, allocating resources, and budgeting for acquisition of products to enhance interior environments.

(5) Furniture, appliances, and accessories. The student evaluates the role of furniture in interior design for residential and nonresidential settings. The student is expected to:

(A) describe characteristics of period styles;

(B) determine the influence of period styles on interior design;

(C) summarize selection and care of quality furniture;

(D) assess aesthetic and functional aspects of furniture; and

(E) describe the impact of technology on furniture.

(6) Furniture, appliances, and accessories. The student determines the role of appliances in interior design for residential and nonresidential settings. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the functional and aesthetic aspects of appliances;

(B) determine the process for selection of appliances;

(C) explain the safe use and care of appliances; and

(D) describe the impact of technology on appliances.

(7) Furniture, appliances, and accessories. The student evaluates the role of accessories in interior design for residential and nonresidential settings. The student is expected to:

(A) identify types of accessories;

(B) describe criteria for selection of accessories;

(C) analyze care of accessories; and

(D) practice guidelines for arranging accessories.

(8) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(B) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(C) demonstrate positive interpersonal skills, including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership; and

(D) demonstrate skills, characteristics, and responsibilities of leaders and effective team members.

(9) Career preparation. The student makes informed career decisions that reflect personal, family, and career goals. The student is expected to:

(A) determine employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements in interior design;

(B) propose short-term and long-term career goals;

(C) evaluate the effect of interior design careers on family life;

(D) describe management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles;

(E) assess factors affecting a safe working environment; and

(F) describe personal and interior design career applications of technology.

(10) Career preparation. The student completes a supervised career-connections experience applying knowledge and skills developed in the study of interior design. The student is expected to:

(A) determine home and business applications of knowledge and skills developed in the study of interior design; and

(B) utilize a career-connections experience to demonstrate occupational applications of competencies developed in the study of interior design.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.83 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.84. Housing, Furnishings, and Equipment Production, Management, and Services (Two to Three Credits).

(a) General requirements. This course provides occupationally specific training and is recommended for students in Grades 11-12. Students may be awarded two to three credits per year for one to two years for the successful completion of this course. Instruction may be delivered through school-based pre-employment laboratory training or through work-based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, preceptorships, mentoring, and job shadowing. The two recommended prerequisites for this course are: Housing, Interior Design.

(b) Training specialization options. All students training in Housing, Furnishings, and Equipment Production, Management, and Services are expected to develop knowledge and skills described in subsection (d)(1), (5), (9), and (13)-(16) of this section. In addition, students are expected to develop knowledge and skills described in one of the following three training specialization options.

(1) Housing, furnishings, and equipment production. Students whose training emphasizes housing, furnishings, and equipment production are expected to develop knowledge and skills described in subsection (d)(2), (3), (6), and (7) of this section.

(2) Housing, furnishings, and equipment management and services. Students whose training emphasizes housing, furnishings, and equipment management and services are expected to develop knowledge and skills described in subsection (d)(2)-(4) and (8) of this section.

(3) Floral design. Students whose training emphasizes floral design are expected to develop knowledge and skills described in subsection (d)(8) and (10)-(12) of this section.

(c) Introduction. Environmental design addresses psychological, physiological, and sociological needs of individuals by enhancing the environments in which they live and work. Individuals use knowledge and skills related to interior and exterior environments, construction, and furnishings to make wise consumer decisions, increase productivity, and compete in industry.

(d) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Design, application, and selection. The student determines the use of elements and principles of design in residential and nonresidential environments and their furnishings. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the elements of design;

(B) exhibit how the elements of design can create various effects;

(C) list the principles of design;

(D) explain how the principles and elements of design differ;

(E) apply guidelines for coordinating furnishings; and

(F) analyze societal and cultural influences on the design of residential and nonresidential environments and their furnishings.

(2) Design, application, and selection. The student analyzes the workmanship, characteristics, use, and care of materials used in the design and construction of residential and nonresidential furnishings and equipment. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze characteristics of materials and workmanship in relationship to durability and use;

(B) identify characteristics of materials and workmanship in relationship to appearance, performance, use, and care of furnishings;

(C) explain labeling requirements and appropriate procedures for the care of various furnishings;

(D) interpret information provided in equipment use and care manuals; and

(E) demonstrate procedures for the care and maintenance of different types of furnishings and equipment.

(3) Design, application, and selection. The student determines treatments and accessories suitable for residential and nonresidential applications. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze products to determine the appropriate style of design;

(B) determine appropriate use of accessories, lighting, materials, and space in various environments;

(C) describe trends in materials, accessories, lighting, and space utilization;

(D) illustrate appropriate window treatments for specific windows;

(E) evaluate cost considerations in accessorizing for various settings;

(F) describe characteristics, use, and care of wall treatments; and

(G) identify characteristics of types of flooring in relationship to design and construction.

(4) Design, application, and selection. The student assesses factors influencing the selection of furniture and equipment for residential and nonresidential applications. The student is expected to:

(A) describe furniture and equipment used in residential and nonresidential applications;

(B) compare furniture and equipment needs of families in different stages of the life cycle;

(C) evaluate economic considerations when selecting furniture and equipment;

(D) arrange furniture and equipment to accommodate floor plans to meet needs and wants;

(E) describe considerations for selecting furniture and equipment to accommodate persons with special needs; and

(F) utilize sources of information on changing trends and technology related to furnishings and equipment.

(5) Workplace skills. The student applies safety and sanitation practices. The student is expected to:

(A) apply safety rules in performing various workplace procedures according to industry standards;

(B) identify potential hazards and prevention practices;

(C) summarize laws pertaining to safety and sanitation practices;

(D) demonstrate appropriate responses to emergency situations; and

(E) determine workplace procedures that protect the environment.

(6) Workplace skills. The student determines appropriate use and care of tools and equipment used in construction of furnishings. The student is expected to:

(A) identify tools and equipment used in construction of furnishings;

(B) demonstrate safe and skillful tool care and use; and

(C) describe the impact of technology on tools, equipment, and construction.

(7) Workplace skills. The student demonstrates skills in selected product design and construction. The student is expected to:

(A) appraise characteristics of good workmanship in furnishings products;

(B) utilize knowledge of design application, selection, and construction to complete furnishings projects; and

(C) analyze uses of technology in furnishings, design, and construction.

(8) Housing, furnishings, and equipment marketing. The student identifies types of business promotion practices and their benefit to the housing and furnishings retailer. The student is expected to:

(A) discuss business promotion objectives in the retail housing and furnishings industry;

(B) analyze techniques using sales promotion, advertising, and displays;

(C) describe the use of technology and other forms of advertising media in housing and furnishings business promotions;

(D) explain how business promotion reflects the environment in which a person lives; and

(E) predict how societal trends and changing demographics influence housing and furnishings business promotions.

(9) Housing, furnishings, and equipment marketing. The student evaluates customer relations as a tool for successful business operations. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the importance of good customer relations in building and maintaining a business;

(B) demonstrate techniques for maintaining good client relationships; and

(C) describe conflict resolution techniques when dealing with customer complaints.

(10) Floral products and services. The student demonstrates appropriate practices in the selection, use, and care of floral products. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate the elements and principles of floral design;

(B) identify basic equipment and supplies used in floral design;

(C) demonstrate proper selection, use, and care of equipment, tools, supplies, and materials for prescribed tasks; and

(D) apply storage and care procedures for floral materials, supplies, cut flowers, and live plants.

(11) Floral products and services. The student applies appropriate trends and technology affecting floral design. The student is expected to:

(A) explain advances in cultivation techniques;

(B) analyze preservation techniques for plants and cut flowers;

(C) describe the benefits of telecommunications in the floral industry;

(D) identify trends in floriculture; and

(E) demonstrate the use of artificial flowers and foliage in the industry.

(12) Floral products and services. The student determines entrepreneurial opportunities in the floral industry. The student is expected to:

(A) describe various opportunities and occupations in the floral industry;

(B) assess ownership and management structures and responsibilities; and

(C) explain the impact of the economy on the floral industry.

(13) Career preparation. The student exhibits employability skills that lead to job success in the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(B) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(C) demonstrate positive interpersonal skills including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership;

(D) evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and achievement;

(E) demonstrate appropriate grooming and appearance for the workplace;

(F) demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette in the workplace; and

(G) exhibit productive work habits and attitudes.

(14) Career preparation. The student determines employment opportunities and preparation requirements for careers in the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries. The student is expected to:

(A) determine preparation requirements for various levels of employment in a variety of careers in the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries;

(B) analyze the future employment outlook in the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries;

(C) describe entrepreneurial opportunities in the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries;

(D) determine how interests, abilities, personal priorities, and family responsibilities affect career choice;

(E) compare rewards and demands for various levels of employment in a variety of careers; and

(F) determine continuing education opportunities that enhance career advancement and promote lifelong learning.

(15) Career preparation. The student demonstrates ethical and legal practices for careers in the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees;

(B) exhibit ethical practices as defined by the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries; and

(C) analyze legal aspects of the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries.

(16) Career preparation. The student analyzes the management of multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze challenges of managing multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles; and

(B) exhibit management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple roles.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.84 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

Chapter 122. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education

Subchapter J. Research, High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter J issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

122.91. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education, Research, High School.

The provisions of Chapter 122, Subchapters B-K, shall supersede 75.83 of this title (relating to Vocational Home Economics) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.91 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.92. Independent Study in Home Economics Education (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grade 12. The prerequisite for this course is completion of at least three courses in a home economics coherent sequence.

(b) Introduction. Home economics education provides individuals and families with essential knowledge and skills for managing the challenges of living and working in a diverse, global society. Individuals utilize these skills to enhance career and personal effectiveness, promote family strength and well-being, and pursue career options.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Research design and development. The student applies multidisciplinary skills to plan and conduct research in home economics. The student is expected to:

(A) select an independent study project consisting of a school-based learning activity that provides an in-depth study related to the home economics career concentration;

(B) collaborate with an interdisciplinary team to develop specifications for the selected independent study project;

(C) conduct the independent study project under the supervision of the teacher and a related industry mentor;

(D) apply the scientific method of investigation;

(E) utilize effective resource management to access, collect, and process data relevant to the independent study project;

(F) apply statistical concepts to analyze data, evaluate results, and draw conclusions; and

(G) compile findings in a coherent and organized manner.

(2) Research design and development. The student demonstrates effective communication and interpersonal skills in conducting and reporting the independent study project. The student is expected to:

(A) utilize communication and interpersonal skills to accomplish project goals;

(B) demonstrate professional conduct in completing all aspects of the independent study project; and

(C) utilize a variety of resources, technology, and reporting formats (such as written, visual, graphical, and oral presentation) to communicate the independent study project to a review panel to include professionals in the field of project focus.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.92 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

Chapter 122. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education

Subchapter K. Other Provisions, High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter K issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

122.101. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Home Economics Education, Other Provisions, High School.

The provisions of Chapter 122, Subchapters B-K, shall supersede 75.83 of this title (relating to Vocational Home Economics) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.101 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.102. Home Economics Summer Program (One-Half Credit).

(a) General requirements. This special projects course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12. Students may be awarded one-half credit for the successful completion of this course each of one or two summers. The prerequisite for this course is completion of two semesters of home economics education.

(b) Content requirements. Schools may provide a locally developed Home Economics Summer Program to meet the educational needs and interests of students. The Home Economics Summer Program should include organized group instruction that may be provided in a variety of arrangements and settings and should accommodate varied student needs and interests. Content for the Home Economics Summer Program should be based upon knowledge and skills appropriately selected from those approved for courses in this chapter. Each student is expected to complete a supervised career-connections experience.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.102 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.

122.103. Home Economics Production, Management, and Services (Two to Three Credits).

(a) General requirements. This course provides occupationally specific training and is recommended for students in Grades 11-12. Students may be awarded two to three credits per year for one to two years for the successful completion of this course. Instruction may be delivered through school-based pre-employment laboratory training or through work-based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, preceptorships, mentoring, and job shadowing.

(b) Content requirements. Schools may provide a locally developed program to provide training which develops knowledge and skills in a broad range of home economics occupational specialization areas. Content for home economics production, management, and services should be designed to meet the occupational preparation needs and interests of students and should be based upon the knowledge and skills selected from two or more occupationally specific training courses in this chapter.

 

Source: The provisions of this 122.103 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5031.