Chapter 123. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education

Subchapter A. Overview, Middle School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter A issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

123.1. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education, Overview, Middle School.

The provisions of Chapter 123, Subchapters A and B, shall supersede 75.50(b), (c), (f), and (g) of this title (relating to Introductory Industrial Technology) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.1 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.2. Technology Education.

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 6-8.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student uses a systems model to describe manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and technology activities. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the inputs, processes, output, and feedback associated with each of the technological systems;

(B) characterize technological activities as applying technology, designing technology, producing technology, and assessing technology; and

(C) describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals.

(2) The student describes and uses manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology to meet specific goals. The student is expected to:

(A) apply manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology to practical problems;

(B) describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of products and services; and

(C) identify the roles of manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology in business and industry.

(3) The student uses appropriate design processes and techniques in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) improve a product or system that meets a specified need; and

(B) identify areas where quality, reliability, and safety can be designed into a product, service, or system.

(4) The student describes emerging and innovative manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare reports on emerging and innovative technologies; and

(B) create a display that presents information on emerging and innovative technologies.

(5) The student describes the importance of quality and how it is measured in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify different quality control applications in each of the technology systems; and

(B) describe the importance of continuous quality improvement.

(6) The student uses the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials and technical processes to complete a project. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the chemical, mechanical, and physical properties and standard units of measure of manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology materials;

(B) identify the processes used in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology;

(C) use a variety of tools, equipment, machines, materials, and technical processes; and

(D) produce an item using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials and technical processes.

(7) The student works safely with tools, equipment, machines, and materials used in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) describe hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(8) The student describes the importance of maintenance in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly; and

(B) describe the results of negligent or improper maintenance.

(9) The student develops a plan for completing a technology project. The student is expected to:

(A) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology project; and

(B) identify and follow the steps needed to complete a project.

(10) The student describes the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(11) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of technological activities;

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments;

(C) describe change and the factors that affect the adoption or rejection of technology; and

(D) describe how and why technology evolves.

(12) The student identifies the factors that influence the evolution of manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how changes in technology affect business and industry;

(B) describe how the development and use of technology is influenced by past events; and

(C) discuss the international effects of technology.

(13) The student solves technological problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions. The student is expected to:

(A) improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(14) The student identifies the factors that determine the cost of an item in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, or bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) work on a budget for a product or project;

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs;

(C) identify the financial factors associated with starting and operating enterprises; and

(D) identify the role of business in a free enterprise system.

(15) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts in technology; and

(C) identify and apply science principles used in technology.

(16) The student describes basic product marketing processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(17) The student selects and reports on career opportunities and requirements in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, or bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest and investigate its entry level and advancement requirements; and

(B) describe the careers available in technology.

(18) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.2 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

Chapter 123. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education

Subchapter B. Exploratory, Middle School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter B issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

123.11. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education, Exploratory, Middle School.

The provisions of Chapter 123, Subchapters A and B, shall supersede 75.50(b), (c), (f), and (g) of this title (relating to Introductory Industrial Technology) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.11 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.12. Exploring Communication Technology.

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 7-8. The prerequisite for this course is Technology Education.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student describes how a systems model can be used to describe communication activities. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the inputs, processes, output, and feedback associated with communication activities;

(B) distinguish between photographic, digital graphic, printed graphic, technical graphic, audio, and video communication systems; and

(C) describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals.

(2) The student uses communication technology to meet practical objectives. The student is expected to:

(A) apply communication technology to individual or community problems;

(B) describe the factors that affect the use and interpretation of communication products; and

(C) identify and describe the roles of communication in business and industry, such as informing, persuading, and educating.

(3) The student designs communication products using appropriate communication design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve communication products that meet specified needs; and

(B) identify areas where quality can be designed into communication products, services, or systems.

(4) The student investigates emerging and innovative communication technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative communication technologies; and

(B) create a display that presents information on emerging and innovative technologies.

(5) The student describes quality and how it is measured in communication. The student is expected to:

(A) describe different quality control applications in communication; and

(B) apply continuous quality improvement techniques to the production of communication items.

(6) The student produces communication items using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the chemical and physical properties of communication materials;

(B) identify the processes used in photographic, digital graphic, printed graphic, technical graphic, audio, and video communication systems;

(C) use a variety of tools, equipment, and machines; and

(D) produce communication items.

(7) The student works safely with tools, equipment, machines, and materials used in communication technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) describe hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(8) The student describes the importance of maintenance in communication. The student is expected to:

(A) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(B) describe the results of improper maintenance.

(9) The student manages a communication technology project. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing a communication technology project; and

(B) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated communication project.

(10) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to communication technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(11) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of technological developments in communication;

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments; and

(C) discuss the international effects of communication technology.

(12) The student identifies the factors that influence the evolution of communication technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how changes in communication technology affect business and industry;

(B) describe how the development and use of communication technology is influenced by past events;

(C) describe change and the factors that affect the adoption or rejection of communication technology; and

(D) describe how and why technology evolves.

(13) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to communication technology. The student is expected to:

(A) improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(14) The student describes the economic factors related to communication technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for a communication product or project;

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs;

(C) identify the financial factors associated with starting and operating communication enterprises; and

(D) explain the role of business in a free enterprise system.

(15) The student applies communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to communication activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use audio and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts in communication technology;

(C) identify and apply science principles used in communication technology; and

(D) use the standard units of measure.

(16) The student describes basic product marketing processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(17) The student investigates career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in communication technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest in communication and investigate its entry level and advancement requirements; and

(B) describe the careers available in communications.

(18) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.12 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.13. Exploring Computer Applications.

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 7-8. The prerequisite for this course is Technology Education.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student describes how a systems model can be used to describe computer hardware and software. The student is expected to:

(A) apply the universal systems model to computer activities;

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with computer applications;

(C) distinguish between mainframe, workstation, personal, and other computer systems; and

(D) describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals.

(2) The student applies computer technology to specific tasks. The student is expected to:

(A) apply computer technology to individual and community problems;

(B) identify and describe the roles of computer technology; and

(C) use computer technology to record, locate, analyze, present, and exchange information.

(3) The student designs a product using a computer system and appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product or computer system that meets a specified need;

(B) use desktop publishing software to create a newsletter;

(C) use graphic software to create and modify images;

(D) use simulation software for research and development; and

(E) use machining software to machine or simulate the machining of a part.

(4) The student investigates emerging and innovative computer technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative computer technologies; and

(B) create a display that presents information on emerging and innovative technologies.

(5) The student describes quality and how it is measured in computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) distinguish between good and bad quality; and

(B) describe how customers perceive quality.

(6) The student develops computer systems using the appropriate resources. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the properties and characteristics of computer-related hardware and software; and

(B) identify, select, and sequence computer resources.

(7) The student works safely with computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) describe hazardous materials and wastes associated with computer technology; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(8) The student demonstrates proper computer and related-equipment maintenance. The student is expected to:

(A) perform selected maintenance procedures on computer-related tools, equipment, and machines; and

(B) describe the results of improper maintenance.

(9) The student manages a computer technology project or system. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing a computer technology project; and

(B) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated computer project.

(10) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to computer technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), copyright, and software piracy. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(11) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of technological developments in computer technology;

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments; and

(C) discuss the international effects of computer technology.

(12) The student identifies the factors that influence the evolution of computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how the development and use of computer technology is influenced by past events;

(B) describe change and the factors that affect the adoption or rejection of computer technology; and

(C) describe how and why technology evolves.

(13) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(14) The student identifies the factors that influence the cost of producing goods and services with computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for a computer project; and

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs.

(15) The student integrates his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills with computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) use computer technology for written, verbal, and visual communication that is consistent with industry standards;

(B) describe binary and hexadecimal numbering systems; and

(C) identify and apply science principles used in computer technology.

(16) The student applies computer technology to the marketing of a product. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(17) The student investigates career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest in computer technology and investigate its entry level and advancement requirements; and

(B) describe the careers available in computer technology.

(18) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.13 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.14. Exploring Construction Technology.

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 7-8. The prerequisite for this course is Technology Education.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student describes how a systems model can be used to describe construction activities. The student is expected to:

(A) apply the universal systems model to construction activities;

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with other systems used in construction;

(C) distinguish between architectural and civil construction systems and related construction systems; and

(D) describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals.

(2) The student applies construction technology to specific tasks. The student is expected to:

(A) apply construction technology to individual or community problems;

(B) describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of constructed items; and

(C) identify and describe the roles of construction.

(3) The student designs an item for construction using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a building or structure that meets a specified need; and

(B) identify areas where quality, reliability, and safety can be designed into a building or structure.

(4) The student investigates emerging and innovative construction technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative construction technologies; and

(B) create a display that presents information on emerging and innovative technologies.

(5) The student describes quality and how it is measured in construction. The student is expected to:

(A) distinguish between good and bad quality; and

(B) describe how customers perceive quality.

(6) The student constructs buildings or structures using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the chemical, mechanical and physical properties and standard units of measure of construction materials;

(B) identify the processes used in construction;

(C) use a variety of tools, equipment, and machines to construct buildings or structures; and

(D) construct an item.

(7) The student works safely with construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) describe hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(8) The student describes the importance of maintenance in construction. The student is expected to:

(A) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(B) describe the results of improper maintenance.

(9) The student manages a construction technology project or system. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing a construction technology project; and

(B) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated construction project.

(10) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to construction technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(11) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of technological developments in construction;

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments; and

(C) discuss the international effects of construction technology.

(12) The student identifies the factors that influence the evolution of construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how changes in construction technology affect business and industry;

(B) describe how the development and use of construction technology is influenced by past events;

(C) describe change and the factors that affect the adoption or rejection of construction technology;

(D) describe how and why technology evolves; and

(E) describe issues related to regional and community planning.

(13) The student demonstrates the ability to solve problems, think critically, and make decisions. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a building or structure by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(14) The student describes the factors related to the cost of construction projects. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for a construction project;

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs;

(C) identify the financial factors associated with starting and operating construction enterprises; and

(D) explain the role of business in a free enterprise system.

(15) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to construction activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts in construction technology; and

(C) identify and apply science principles used in construction technology.

(16) The student describes basic product marketing in construction. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(17) The student investigates career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest in construction and investigate its entry level and advancement requirements; and

(B) describe the careers available in construction.

(18) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.14 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.15. Exploring Energy, Power, and Transportation Technology.

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 7-8. The prerequisite for this course is Technology Education.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student describes how a systems model can be used to describe energy, power, and transportation activities. The student is expected to:

(A) apply the universal systems model to energy, power, and transportation activities;

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with energy, power, and transportation systems;

(C) distinguish between mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal power systems;

(D) distinguish between various forms of energy;

(E) describe the differences between the various transportation modes, such as land, marine, air, and space;

(F) describe the technological systems in transportation, such as propulsion, suspension, guidance, control, support, and structure; and

(G) describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals.

(2) The student applies energy, power, and transportation technology to specific tasks. The student is expected to:

(A) apply energy, power, and transportation technology to individual and community problems;

(B) describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of energy, power, and transportation technology; and

(C) identify and describe the roles of energy, power, and transportation.

(3) The student designs energy, power, and transportation products or services using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve energy, power, and transportation products or services that meet a specified need; and

(B) identify areas where quality, reliability, and safety can be designed into a product, service, or system.

(4) The student investigates emerging and innovative energy, power, and transportation technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative energy, power, and transportation technologies; and

(B) create a display that presents information on emerging and innovative technologies.

(5) The student describes quality and how it is measured in energy, power, and transportation. The student is expected to:

(A) distinguish between good and bad quality; and

(B) describe how customers perceive quality.

(6) The student builds energy, power, and transportation devices using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the chemical, mechanical and physical properties and standard units of measure of energy, power, and transportation materials and resources;

(B) contrast the characteristics and sources of energy and power;

(C) describe the processes used in energy, power, and transportation, such as conversion, control, transmission, and storage;

(D) describe the processes used in transportation, such as receiving, holding/storing, loading, moving, unloading, and delivering;

(E) use a variety of tools, equipment, and machines to build energy, power, and transportation items; and

(F) build an energy, power, and transportation product or system.

(7) The student works safely with energy, power, and transportation technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) describe hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(8) The student describes the importance of maintenance in energy, power, and transportation. The student is expected to:

(A) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(B) describe the results of improper maintenance.

(9) The student manages an energy, power, and transportation technology project or system. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing an energy, power, and transportation technology project; and

(B) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated energy, power, and transportation project.

(10) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to energy, power, and transportation technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(11) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of technological developments in energy, power, and transportation;

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments; and

(C) discuss the international effects of energy, power, and transportation technology.

(12) The student identifies the factors that influence the evolution of energy, power, and transportation technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how changes in energy, power, and transportation technology affect business and industry;

(B) describe how the development and use of energy, power, and transportation technology is influenced by past events;

(C) describe change and the factors that affect the adoption or rejection of energy, power, and transportation technology; and

(D) describe how and why technology evolves.

(13) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to energy, power, and transportation technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve an energy, power, and transportation product or service by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(14) The student describes the economic factors related to energy, power, and transportation technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for an energy, power, and transportation project;

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs;

(C) identify the financial factors associated with starting and operating energy, power, and transportation enterprises; and

(D) explain the role of business in a free enterprise system.

(15) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to energy, power, and transportation activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts in energy, power, and transportation technology; and

(C) identify and apply science principles used in energy, power, and transportation technology.

(16) The student describes the marketing of energy, power, and transportation products and services. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(17) The student investigates career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in energy, power, and transportation technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest in energy, power, and transportation, and investigate its entry level and advancement requirements; and

(B) describe the careers available in energy, power, and transportation.

(18) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.15 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.16. Exploring Manufacturing Technology.

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 7-8. The prerequisite for this course is Technology Education.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student describes how a systems model can be used to describe manufacturing activities. The student is expected to:

(A) apply the universal systems model to manufacturing activities;

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with manufacturing systems;

(C) distinguish between continuous, intermittent, custom, and other manufacturing systems; and

(D) describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals.

(2) The student applies manufacturing technology to specific tasks. The student is expected to:

(A) apply manufacturing technology to individual or community problems;

(B) describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of manufacturing items; and

(C) identify and describe the roles of manufacturing.

(3) The student designs a product or manufacturing system using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product or manufacturing system that meets a specified need; and

(B) identify areas where quality, reliability, and safety can be designed into a product or system.

(4) The student investigates emerging and innovative manufacturing technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative manufacturing technologies; and

(B) create a display that presents information on emerging and innovative technologies.

(5) The student describes quality and how it is measured in manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A) distinguish between good and bad quality; and

(B) describe how customers perceive quality.

(6) The student builds products or systems using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the chemical, mechanical, and physical properties of manufacturing materials;

(B) identify the processes used in manufacturing;

(C) use a variety of tools, equipment, and machines to manufacture products; and

(D) manufacture an item.

(7) The student works safely with tools, equipment, machines, and materials used in manufacturing technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) describe hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(8) The student describes the importance of maintenance in manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(B) describe the results of improper maintenance.

(9) The student manages a manufacturing technology project or system. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing a manufacturing project; and

(B) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated manufacturing project.

(10) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to manufacturing technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(11) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of technological developments in manufacturing;

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments; and

(C) discuss the international effects of manufacturing technology.

(12) The student identifies the factors that influence the evolution of manufacturing technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how changes in manufacturing technology affect business and industry;

(B) describe how the development and use of manufacturing technology is influenced by past events;

(C) describe change and the factors that affect the adoption or rejection of manufacturing technology; and

(D) describe how and why technology evolves.

(13) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to manufacturing technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(14) The student identifies the factors that influence the cost of producing goods and services in manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for manufacturing a product;

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs;

(C) identify the financial factors associated with starting and operating manufacturing enterprises; and

(D) explain the role of business in a free enterprise system.

(15) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to manufacturing activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts in manufacturing technology;

(C) identify and apply science principles used in manufacturing technology; and

(D) use the appropriate units of measure.

(16) The student describes basic product marketing processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(17) The student investigates career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in manufacturing technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest in manufacturing and investigate its entry-level and advancement requirements; and

(B) describe the careers available in manufacturing.

(18) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.16 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

Chapter 123. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education

Subchapter C. Overview, High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter C issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

123.31. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education, Overview, High School.

The provisions of Chapter 123, Subchapters C-G, shall supersede 75.85 of this title (relating to Industrial Technology Education) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.31 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.32. Technology Systems (One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student describes how a systems model can be used to describe manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology activities. The student is expected to:

(A) apply the universal systems model to technological activities;

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with each of the technology systems; and

(C) describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals.

(2) The student describes how manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology can be used to solve practical problems. The student is expected to:

(A) apply manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology to individual or community problems;

(B) describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology products and services;

(C) identify and describe the roles of manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology in business and industry; and

(D) characterize technological activities as applying technology, designing technology, producing technology, and assessing technology.

(3) The student uses appropriate design processes and techniques to develop or improve products or services in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product or system that meets a specified need; and

(B) identify areas where quality, reliability, and safety can be designed into a product or service.

(4) The student describes emerging and innovative manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative technologies in at least two of the following content areas: manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, or bio-related technologies; and

(B) conduct research and experimentation in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology.

(5) The student describes the importance of quality and how it is measured in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) distinguish between good and bad quality; and

(B) describe how customers perceive quality.

(6) The student uses a variety of tools, equipment, machines, materials and technical processes to build products. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the chemical, mechanical, and physical properties of manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology materials;

(B) describe the basic processes used in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology;

(C) use a variety of tools, equipment, and machines; and

(D) produce a product or provide a service.

(7) The student works safely with tools, equipment, machines, and materials used in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(8) The student describes the importance of maintenance in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly;

(B) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C) describe the results of negligent or improper maintenance.

(9) The student manages a technology project or system. The student is expected to:

(A) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology project; and

(B) identify and follow the steps needed to complete a project.

(10) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(11) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of technological solutions;

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments; and

(C) discuss the international effects of technology.

(12) The student identifies the factors that influence the evolution of manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how changes in technology affect business and industry;

(B) describe how the development and use of technology is influenced by past events;

(C) describe change and the factors that affect the adoption or rejection of technology; and

(D) describe how and why technology evolves.

(13) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technology.

(14) The student identifies the factors that influence the cost of producing goods and services in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for a product or project;

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs;

(C) identify the financial factors associated with starting and operating enterprises; and

(D) describe the role of business in a free enterprise system.

(15) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts in technology; and

(C) identify and apply science principles used in technology.

(16) The student describes basic marketing processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(17) The student selects and reports on career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest in manufacturing, construction, communication, energy, power, transportation, and bio-related technology, and investigate its entry-level and advancement requirements and its growth potential; and

(B) describe the careers available in technology and engineering.

(18) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.32 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.33. Engineering Principles (One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student describes how a systems model can be used to describe engineering and technological activities. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the inputs, processes, output, and feedback associated with engineering and technological systems;

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with engineering technological activities;

(C) describe the difference between open and closed systems; and

(D) describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals.

(2) The student applies engineering concepts to specific problems. The student is expected to:

(A) distinguish between engineering, science, and technology;

(B) use engineering concepts to solve practical problems;

(C) use calculators and computers to help solve problems;

(D) use computers for simulation;

(E) use tools and laboratory equipment for testing and evaluation; and

(F) use precision measuring instruments.

(3) The student designs products or systems using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) improve a product or system that meets a specified need;

(B) identify areas where quality, reliability, and safety can be designed into a product or system;

(C) interpret and produce engineering drawings using standard technical communication techniques; and

(D) describe patents and the patenting process.

(4) The student investigates emerging and innovative applications of technology in engineering. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative applications of technology in engineering; and

(B) research and experiment with new technologies.

(5) The student describes quality and how it is measured in engineering. The student is expected to:

(A) identify different quality control applications in engineering; and

(B) describe how customers perceive the quality of products and services and how they affect engineering decisions.

(6) The student builds products or systems using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the chemical, mechanical, and physical properties of engineering materials;

(B) identify and describe the processes needed to complete a project;

(C) use a variety of tools, equipment, machines, and materials; and

(D) design and produce an item.

(7) The student practices safe work habits. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(8) The student describes the importance of maintenance. The student is expected to:

(A) perform basic maintenance on selected tools, equipment, and machines;

(B) handle and store tools and materials correctly; and

(C) describe the results of negligent or improper maintenance.

(9) The student manages an engineering project. The student is expected to:

(A) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated engineering project; and

(B) develop a plan for completing an individual project.

(10) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(11) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of engineering activities; and

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments.

(12) The student describes the factors that affect the evolution of technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how changes in technology affect engineering practices;

(B) describe how the development and use of technology in engineering is influenced by past events;

(C) discuss the international effects of technology;

(D) describe how advancements in technology have affected the field of engineering;

(E) describe change and the factors that affect the adoption or rejection of new ideas; and

(F) describe how and why technology evolves.

(13) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to engineering. The student is expected to:

(A) use an engineering approach to problem solving to improve a product;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to engineering problems and solutions.

(14) The student identifies the factors that influence the cost of an item or service. The student is expected to:

(A) work on a budget for a project; and

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs.

(15) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to engineering activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) locate relevant information needed to solve problems;

(C) use mathematics concepts to solve engineering problems;

(D) identify and apply science principles used to solve problems; and

(E) use the appropriate units of measure.

(16) The student describes the relationship between engineering and marketing. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service;

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company; and

(C) describe how customer demands influence the design of an object.

(17) The student selects and reports on career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in engineering and technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest in engineering and investigate its entry-level and advancement requirements and its growth potential;

(B) distinguish between engineering, science, and technology;

(C) describe the various specializations in engineering; and

(D) describe the roles and functions of engineers, technologists, and technicians.

(18) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.33 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

Chapter 123. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education

Subchapter D. Exploratory, High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter D issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

123.41. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education, Exploratory, High School.

The provisions of Chapter 123, Subchapters C-G, shall supersede 75.85 of this title (relating to Industrial Technology Education) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.41 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.42. Communication Systems (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Technology Systems.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student describes how a systems model relates to communication activities. The student is expected to:

(A) apply the universal systems model to communication activities;

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with communications systems; and

(C) describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals.

(2) The student selects and uses the proper communication technology to meet practical objectives. The student is expected to:

(A) apply communication technology to individual or community problems;

(B) describe the factors that affect the use and interpretation of communication products and services;

(C) identify and describe the roles of communication in business and industry, such as informing, persuading, and educating; and

(D) distinguish between photographic, digital graphic, printed graphic, technical graphic, audio, and video communication systems.

(3) The student designs communication products using appropriate communication design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the design processes and techniques used in communication technology;

(B) develop or improve communication products that meet specified needs; and

(C) identify areas where quality can be designed into communication products, services, or systems.

(4) The student investigates emerging and innovative communication technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative communication technologies; and

(B) conduct research and experimentation in communication technology.

(5) The student describes quality and how it is measured in communications. The student is expected to:

(A) describe and apply different quality control applications; and

(B) apply continuous quality improvement techniques to the production of communication products and services.

(6) The student produces communication items using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the chemical and physical properties of communication materials;

(B) describe the processes used in photographic, digital graphic, printed graphic, technical graphic, audio, and video communication systems;

(C) use a variety of tools, equipment, machines, and materials to produce communication products and services; and

(D) produce communication items.

(7) The student works safely with communication tools, equipment, machines, and materials. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(8) The student describes the importance of maintenance in communications. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly;

(B) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C) describe the results of negligent or improper maintenance.

(9) The student manages a communication technology project. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing a communication technology project; and

(B) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated communication project.

(10) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to communication technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(11) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of technological solutions;

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals societies, cultures, economies, and environments; and

(C) discuss the international effects of communication technology.

(12) The student identifies the factors that influence the evolution of communication technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how changes in communication technology affect business and industry;

(B) describe how the development and use of communication technology are influenced by past events;

(C) describe change and the factors that affect the adoption or rejection of communication technology; and

(D) describe how and why technology evolves.

(13) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to communications. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(14) The student identifies the factors that influence the cost of producing communication goods and services. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for a communication product or project;

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs;

(C) identify the financial factors associated with starting and operating communication enterprises; and

(D) explain the role of business in a free enterprise system.

(15) The student applies communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to communication activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use audio and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts in communication technology;

(C) identify and apply science principles used in communication technology; and

(D) use the appropriate units of measure.

(16) The student describes basic product and service marketing processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(17) The student investigates career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in communication technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest in communication and investigate its entry level and advancement requirements and its growth potential; and

(B) describe the careers available in communication technology.

(18) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.42 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.43. Manufacturing Systems (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Technology Systems.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student describes how a systems model can be used to describe manufacturing activities. The student is expected to:

(A) apply the universal systems model to manufacturing activities;

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with manufacturing activities; and

(C) describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals.

(2) The student selects and uses manufacturing technology to meet practical objectives. The student is expected to:

(A) apply manufacturing technology to individual or community problems;

(B) describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of manufactured items;

(C) identify and describe the roles of manufacturing; and

(D) distinguish between continuous, intermittent, custom, and other manufacturing systems.

(3) The student designs a product using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the design processes and techniques used in manufacturing;

(B) develop or improve a product that meets specified objectives; and

(C) identify areas where quality, reliability, and safety can be designed into a product system.

(4) The student investigates emerging and innovative manufacturing technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative manufacturing technologies; and

(B) conduct research and experimentation in manufacturing technology.

(5) The student describes quality and how it is measured in manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A) describe different quality control applications in manufacturing; and

(B) apply continuous quality improvement techniques to the production of an item.

(6) The student manufactures products using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the chemical, mechanical, and physical properties of manufacturing materials;

(B) describe the manufacturing processes;

(C) use a variety of tools, equipment, machines, and materials to manufacture products; and

(D) manufacture an item.

(7) The student works safely with manufacturing technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(8) The student describes the importance of maintenance in manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly;

(B) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C) describe the results of negligent or improper maintenance.

(9) The student manages a manufacturing technology project or system. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing a manufacturing technology project; and

(B) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated manufacturing project.

(10) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to manufacturing technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(11) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of technological developments in manufacturing;

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments; and

(C) discuss the international effects of manufacturing technology.

(12) The student identifies the factors that influence the evolution of manufacturing technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how changes in manufacturing technology affect business and industry;

(B) describe how the development and use of manufacturing technology are influenced by past events;

(C) describe change and the factors that affect the adoption or rejection of manufacturing technology; and

(D) describe how and why technology evolves.

(13) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of manufacturing technology.

(14) The student identifies the factors that influence the cost of producing goods and services in manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for manufacturing a product;

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs;

(C) identify the financial factors associated with starting and operating manufacturing enterprises; and

(D) explain the role of business in a free enterprise system.

(15) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to manufacturing activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts in manufacturing technology;

(C) identify and apply science principles used in manufacturing technology; and

(D) use the appropriate units of measure.

(16) The student describes basic product and service marketing processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(17) The student investigates career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in manufacturing technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest in manufacturing and investigate its entry-level and advancement requirements and its growth potential; and

(B) describe the careers available in manufacturing.

(18) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.43 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.44. Construction Systems (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Technology Systems.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student describes how a systems model can be used to describe construction activities. The student is expected to:

(A) apply the universal systems model to construction activities;

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with construction systems;

(C) describe the subsystems used in construction; and

(D) describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals.

(2) The student selects and uses the proper construction technology to meet practical objectives. The student is expected to:

(A) distinguish between architectural and civil construction systems and related construction systems;

(B) apply construction technology to individual or community problems;

(C) describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of constructed items; and

(D) identify and describe the roles of construction.

(3) The student designs an item for construction using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the design processes and techniques used in construction;

(B) develop or improve a building or structure that meets specified needs; and

(C) identify areas where quality, reliability, and safety can be designed into a building or structure.

(4) The student investigates emerging and innovative construction technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative construction technologies; and

(B) conduct research and experimentation in construction technology.

(5) The student describes quality and how it is measured in construction. The student is expected to:

(A) describe different quality control applications in construction; and

(B) apply continuous quality improvement techniques to the construction of a building or structure.

(6) The student builds buildings or structures using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of construction materials;

(B) describe the processes used in construction;

(C) use a variety of tools, equipment, and machines to construct buildings or structures; and

(D) construct a building or structure.

(7) The student works safely with construction tools, equipment, machines, and materials. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(8) The student describes the importance of maintenance in construction. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly;

(B) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C) describe the results of negligent or improper maintenance.

(9) The student manages a construction project. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing a construction project; and

(B) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated construction project.

(10) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to construction technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(11) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of technological developments in construction;

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments;

(C) discuss the international effects of construction technology; and

(D) describe the issues related to regional and community planning.

(12) The student identifies the factors that influence the evolution of construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how changes in construction technology affect business and industry;

(B) describe how the development and use of construction technology are influenced by past events;

(C) describe change and the factors that affect the adoption or rejection of construction technology; and

(D) describe how and why technology evolves.

(13) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a building or structure by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(14) The student identifies the factors that influence the cost of goods and services in construction projects. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for a construction project;

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs;

(C) identify the financial factors associated with starting and operating construction enterprises; and

(D) explain the role of business in a free enterprise system.

(15) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to construction activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts in construction technology;

(C) identify and apply science principles used in construction technology; and

(D) use the appropriate units of measure.

(16) The student describes basic product marketing processes and techniques used in construction. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(17) The student investigates career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest in construction and investigate its entry-level and advancement requirements and its growth potential; and

(B) describe the careers available in construction technology.

(18) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.44 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.45. Energy, Power, and Transportation Systems (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Technology Systems.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student describes how a systems model can be used to describe energy, power, and transportation activities. The student is expected to:

(A) apply the universal systems model to energy, power, and transportation activities;

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with energy, power, and transportation systems;

(C) distinguish between various forms of energy; and

(D) describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals.

(2) The student applies energy, power, and transportation technology to specific tasks. The student is expected to:

(A) apply energy, power, and transportation technology to individual and community problems;

(B) distinguish between mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal power systems;

(C) describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of energy, power, and transportation products and services; and

(D) identify and describe the roles of energy, power, and transportation systems.

(3) The student designs energy, power, and transportation products or services using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the design processes and techniques used in energy, power, and transportation;

(B) develop or improve energy, power, and transportation products or services that meet a specified need; and

(C) identify areas where quality, reliability, and safety can be designed into a product, service, or system.

(4) The student investigates emerging and innovative energy, power, and transportation technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative energy, power, and transportation technologies; and

(B) conduct research and experimentation in energy, power, and transportation technology.

(5) The student describes quality and how it is measured in energy, power, and transportation. The student is expected to:

(A) describe different quality control applications in energy, power, and transportation; and

(B) apply continuous quality improvement techniques to the use and production of energy, power, and transportation.

(6) The student builds energy, power, and transportation devices using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials, and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of energy, power, and transportation materials and resources;

(B) contrast the characteristics and sources of energy and power;

(C) describe the processes used in energy, power, and transportation;

(D) use a variety of tools, equipment, and machines to build energy, power, and transportation items; and

(E) build an energy, power, and transportation product or system.

(7) The student works safely with energy, power, and transportation technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(8) The student describes the importance of maintenance in energy, power, and transportation. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly;

(B) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C) describe the results of negligent or improper maintenance.

(9) The student manages an energy, power, and transportation technology project or system. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing an energy, power, and transportation technology project; and

(B) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated energy, power, and transportation project.

(10) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to energy, power, and transportation technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weight. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(11) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of technological developments in energy, power, and transportation;

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments;

(C) discuss the international effects of energy, power, and transportation technology; and

(D) describe the issues related to regional and community planning and energy, power, and transportation.

(12) The student identifies the factors that influence the evolution of energy, power, and transportation technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how changes in energy, power, and transportation technology affect business and industry;

(B) describe how the development and use of energy, power, and transportation technology are influenced by past events;

(C) describe change and the factors that affect the adoption or rejection of energy, power, and transportation technology; and

(D) describe how and why technology evolves in energy, power, and transportation.

(13) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to energy, power, and transportation technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve an energy, power, and transportation product or service by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(14) The student identifies the factors that influence the cost of producing goods and services related to energy, power, and transportation technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for an energy, power, and transportation project;

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs;

(C) identify the financial factors associated with starting and operating energy, power, and transportation enterprises; and

(D) explain the role of business in a free enterprise system.

(15) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to energy, power, and transportation activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts in energy, power, and transportation technology;

(C) identify and apply science principles used in energy, power, and transportation technology; and

(D) use the appropriate units of measure.

(16) The student describes basic product and service marketing in energy, power, and transportation. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(17) The student investigates career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in energy, power, and transportation technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest in energy, power, and transportation, and investigate its entry-level and advancement requirements and its growth potential; and

(B) describe the type of careers available in energy, power, and transportation technology.

(18) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.45 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.46. Bio-related Technology Systems (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Technology Systems.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student describes how a systems model can be used to describe bio-related technology activities. The student is expected to:

(A) apply the universal systems model to bio-related technology activities;

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with bio-related technology systems; and

(C) describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals.

(2) The student applies bio-related technology to meet practical objectives. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how bio-related technology can be used to solve individual or community problems;

(B) describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of bio-related technology;

(C) identify and describe the roles of bio-related technology in business and industry; and

(D) distinguish between the bio-related technology systems, such as ergonomic design, health technology, waste management, fuels and chemicals, and plant production.

(3) The student designs a bio-related technology product or system using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a bio-related technology product or service that meets a specified need; and

(B) identify areas where quality, reliability, and safety can be designed into bio-related technology products or services.

(4) The student investigates emerging and innovative bio-related technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative bio-related technologies; and

(B) conduct research and experimentation in bio-related technology.

(5) The student describes quality and how it is measured in bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe different quality control applications in bio-related technology; and

(B) apply continuous quality improvement techniques to bio-related technology activities.

(6) The student produces bio-related technology products or services using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials, and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the mechanical, chemical, and physical characteristics of bio-related technology materials;

(B) describe the processes used in bio-related technology, such as propagating, growing, maintaining, harvesting, adapting, treating, and converting; and

(C) use a variety of tools, equipment, machines, and materials to produce bio-related technology products and services.

(7) The student works safely with bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(8) The student describes the importance of maintenance in bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly;

(B) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C) describe the results of negligent or improper maintenance.

(9) The student manages a bio-related technology project or system. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing a bio-related technology project; and

(B) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated bio-related technology project.

(10) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to bio-related technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and patents. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(11) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of developments in bio-related technology;

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments; and

(C) discuss the international effects of bio-related technology.

(12) The student identifies the factors that influence the evolution of bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how changes in bio-related technology affect business and industry;

(B) describe how the development and use of bio-related technology are influenced by past events;

(C) describe change and the factors that affect the adoption or rejection of bio-related technology; and

(D) describe how and why technology evolves.

(13) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product or service by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(14) The student identifies the factors that influence the cost of producing bio-related technology goods and services. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for a bio-related technology project; and

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs.

(15) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts in bio-related technology;

(C) identify and apply science principles used in bio-related technology; and

(D) use the appropriate units of measure.

(16) The student describes basic product and service marketing processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(17) The student investigates career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in bio-related technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest in bio-related technology and investigate its entry-level and advancement requirements and its growth potential; and

(B) describe the careers available in bio-related technology.

(18) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.46 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.47. Computer Applications (One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student describes how the concept of a system can be used to describe computer activities. The student is expected to:

(A) apply the universal systems model to computer activities;

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with computer systems; and

(C) describe how the interaction of technical systems helps solve complex problems.

(2) The student selects the proper computer technology to meet specific objectives. The student is expected to:

(A) apply computer technology to individual or community problems;

(B) describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of computer products and services;

(C) distinguish between mainframe, workstation, personal, and other computer systems;

(D) identify and describe the roles of computer technology; and

(E) use computer technology to record, locate, analyze, present, and exchange information.

(3) The student uses computer applications to facilitate the design and development of products or services. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product or system that meets specified objectives;

(B) use desktop-publishing software to create a newsletter;

(C) use graphic software to create and modify images;

(D) use simulation software for research and development;

(E) use machining software to produce or simulate the production of products;

(F) simulate computer-aided manufacturing;

(G) use tool path verification software; and

(H) use computer-aided drafting and design (CADD) applications to produce project drawings.

(4) The student investigates emerging and innovative computer technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative computer technologies; and

(B) conduct research and experimentation in computer technology.

(5) The student describes the importance of quality and how it is measured in computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe and apply different quality control techniques in computer technology; and

(B) apply continuous quality improvement techniques to computer activities.

(6) The student develops products or services using the appropriate computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the properties and characteristics of computer-related hardware and software;

(B) identify, select, and sequence the proper computer resources to complete a project;

(C) describe the processes used in computer technology; and

(D) use a variety of computer resources to complete a project.

(7) The student works safely with computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(8) The student describes the importance of maintenance of computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) locate and perform selected maintenance procedures on computer-related tools, equipment, and machines;

(B) handle and store computer equipment and materials correctly; and

(C) describe the results of negligent or improper computer maintenance.

(9) The student manages a computer technology project. The student is expected to:

(A) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated computer project; and

(B) develop a plan for completing a project.

(10) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to computer technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), copyright, and software piracy. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(11) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of technological developments in computer technology;

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments;

(C) discuss the international effects of the use of computer technology; and

(D) describe how and why technology evolves.

(12) The student describes how and why computer technology evolves. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how changes in computer technology affect business and industry;

(B) describe how the development and use of computer technology are influenced by past events;

(C) describe change and the factors that affect the adoption or rejection of computer technology; and

(D) describe the factors that encourage the evolution of technology.

(13) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of computer technology.

(14) The student describes the factors that influence the cost of producing products and services with computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for a computer project;

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs; and

(C) identify the financial factors associated with starting and operating computer enterprises.

(15) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills with computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare technical reports and presentations;

(B) use binary and hexadecimal numbering systems; and

(C) identify and apply science principles used in computer technology.

(16) The student describes how basic marketing processes and procedures can be improved using computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(17) The student investigates career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in computer technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest in computer technology and investigate its entry-level and advancement requirements and its growth potential; and

(B) describe a variety of careers available in computer technology.

(18) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.47 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

Chapter 123. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education

Subchapter E. Technical, High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter E issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

123.61. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education, Technical, High School.

The provisions of Chapter 123, Subchapters C-G, shall supersede 75.85 of this title (relating to Industrial Technology Education) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.61 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.62. Architectural Graphics (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Communication Systems.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student applies architectural graphics technology to practical problems. The student is expected to:

(A) apply architectural graphics technology to individual and community problems;

(B) describe the factors that affect the use of architectural graphics products and services; and

(C) identify and describe the roles of architectural graphics in business and industry.

(2) The student uses the appropriate architectural graphic design processes and techniques to develop a variety of architectural drawings. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve architectural drawings that conform to industry standards; and

(B) identify areas where the quality and reliability of communication can be improved using architectural graphics technology.

(3) The student investigates emerging and innovative architectural graphic technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative architectural graphic technologies; and

(B) describe the advantages and disadvantages of changes in architectural graphic technology.

(4) The student describes quality and how it is measured in architectural graphics. The student is expected to:

(A) use different quality control applications in architectural graphics; and

(B) apply continuous quality improvement techniques to the production of architectural drawings.

(5) The student produces a variety of architectural drawings using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials, and processes. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the tools, equipment, machines, materials, and processes used in architectural graphic communication; and

(B) use a variety of architectural graphics tools, equipment, and machines (traditional and computer-based) to produce drawings or models.

(6) The student works safely with architectural graphics technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(7) The student demonstrates proper maintenance of architectural graphics tools, equipment, and machines. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly;

(B) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C) determine when items may require service or replacement.

(8) The student manages an architectural graphics technology project. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing an architectural graphics technology project;

(B) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated architectural graphics project; and

(C) determine the resources needed to complete a project.

(9) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to architectural graphics technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required;

(B) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations; and

(C) locate and use the standards and conventions used in the architectural graphics industry.

(10) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to architectural graphics. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(11) The student describes the factors that influence the cost of producing architectural graphics drawings. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for architectural graphics project; and

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs.

(12) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to architectural graphics activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts in architectural graphics technology;

(C) identify and apply science principles used in architectural graphics technology; and

(D) use the appropriate scales for measuring.

(13) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.62 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.63. Engineering Graphics (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Communication Systems.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student applies engineering graphics technology to practical problems. The student is expected to:

(A) apply engineering graphics technology to communicate ideas;

(B) describe the factors that affect the use of engineering graphics items;

(C) identify and describe the roles of engineering graphics; and

(D) use engineering graphics to help visualize objects and conduct analyses.

(2) The student designs an item using appropriate engineering graphic design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve an item using engineering graphics technology; and

(B) use traditional and concurrent engineering design processes.

(3) The student investigates emerging and innovative engineering graphic technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative engineering graphic technologies; and

(B) describe the advantages and disadvantages of changes in engineering graphics technology.

(4) The student describes the importance of quality and how it is determined in engineering graphics. The student is expected to:

(A) describe different quality control applications in engineering graphics; and

(B) apply continuous quality improvement techniques to the design of an item.

(5) The student produces a variety of engineering drawings using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials, and processes. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the tools, equipment, machines, materials, and processes used in engineering graphics; and

(B) use a variety of engineering graphics tools, equipment, and machines (traditional and computer-based) to produce drawings or models.

(6) The student works safely with engineering graphics technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(7) The student demonstrates proper maintenance of engineering graphics tools and equipment. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly;

(B) determine when items may require service or replacement; and

(C) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines.

(8) The student manages an engineering graphics technology project. The student is expected to:

(A) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated engineering graphics project;

(B) develop a plan for completing an engineering graphics project; and

(C) determine the resources needed to complete a project.

(9) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to engineering graphics technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(10) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to engineering graphics. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product by following an engineering design problem-solving process;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions;

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions; and

(D) evaluate proposed solutions to problems.

(11) The student describes the factors that influence the cost of producing engineering graphic drawings. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for an engineering graphics project; and

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs.

(12) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to engineering graphics activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts when producing drawings;

(C) identify and apply science principles used in engineering graphics; and

(D) use the appropriate scales for measuring.

(13) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.63 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.64. Communication Graphics (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Communication Systems.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student applies communication graphics technology to practical problems. The student is expected to:

(A) apply communication graphics technology to individual and community problems;

(B) describe the factors that affect the use of communication graphics products and services; and

(C) identify and describe the roles of communication graphics in business and industry.

(2) The student uses the appropriate communication graphic design processes and techniques to develop a variety of communication products. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve communication products that conform to industry standards; and

(B) identify areas where the quality and reliability of communication can be improved using communication graphics technology.

(3) The student investigates emerging and innovative communication graphic technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative communication graphic technologies; and

(B) describe the advantages and disadvantages of changes in communication graphics.

(4) The student describes quality and how it is measured in communication graphics. The student is expected to:

(A) use different quality control applications in communication graphics; and

(B) apply continuous quality improvement techniques to the production of communication products.

(5) The student produces a variety of communication products using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials, and processes. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the tools, equipment, machines, materials, and processes used in communication graphics; and

(B) use a variety of communication graphics tools, equipment, and machines (traditional and computer-based) to produce communication products.

(6) The student works safely with communication graphics technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(7) The student demonstrates proper maintenance of communication graphics tools, equipment, and machines. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly;

(B) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C) determine when items may require service or replacement.

(8) The student manages a communication graphics technology project. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing a communication graphics technology project;

(B) participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated communication graphics project; and

(C) determine the resources needed to complete a project.

(9) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to communication graphics technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required;

(B) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations; and

(C) locate and use the standards and conventions used in the communication graphics industry.

(10) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to communication graphics. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(11) The student describes the factors that influence the cost of producing communication graphics products. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for a communication graphics project; and

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs.

(12) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to communication graphics activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts in communication graphics technology;

(C) identify and apply science principles used in communication graphics technology; and

(D) use the appropriate scales for measuring.

(13) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.64 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.65. Manufacturing Technology (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Manufacturing Systems.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student selects and uses the appropriate resources to complete complex manufacturing tasks. The student is expected to:

(A) identify a problem and determine the appropriate resources needed to solve the problem; and

(B) describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of manufactured items.

(2) The student improves or modifies a product utilizing designated design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) use specified design process and techniques to develop and communicate his/her ideas; and

(B) develop or improve a product or system that solves a practical problem.

(3) The student investigates emerging and innovative applications of manufacturing technology. The student is expected to:

(A) use emerging and innovative manufacturing technologies to produce products; and

(B) conduct research and experimentation in manufacturing technology to determine the effectiveness of new technologies.

(4) The student describes quality and how it is measured in manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A) produce items that meet a specified level of quality;

(B) recommend where and how the quality of an item can be improved; and

(C) explain the factors that affect the quality of products.

(5) The student uses advanced tools, equipment, machines, materials, and technical processes to complete complex projects. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the chemical, mechanical, and physical properties of manufacturing materials;

(B) develop advanced skills related to materials processing in manufacturing;

(C) use a variety of tools, equipment, and machines to manufacture complex products; and

(D) manufacture items that require advanced knowledge and skill.

(6) The student works safely with manufacturing technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes correctly;

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately; and

(E) recommend improvements in safety procedures.

(7) The student performs basic scheduled maintenance on machines and equipment. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly;

(B) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C) develop a maintenance plan for selected machines and equipment.

(8) The student manages a complete manufacturing project. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing a manufacturing technology project;

(B) identify and describe the resources required to complete a project; and

(C) develop a timeline for completing a project.

(9) The student follows the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to a research and development project, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required;

(B) locate the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations; and

(C) interpret and follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(10) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to manufacturing technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(11) The student determines the cost of a product being manufactured. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for manufacturing a product; and

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs.

(12) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to manufacturing activities. The student is expected to:

(A) write technical reports;

(B) make technical presentations to groups of individuals;

(C) identify and use mathematics concepts in manufacturing technology; and

(D) identify and apply science principles used in manufacturing technology.

(13) The student identifies and practices appropriate employability skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.65 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.66. Architectural Construction (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Construction Systems.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student selects and uses the appropriate resources to complete architectural construction tasks. The student is expected to:

(A) apply architectural construction technology to individual or local problems;

(B) identify a problem and determine the appropriate resources needed to solve the problem; and

(C) describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of buildings.

(2) The student designs or modifies a structure using designated design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a building design that meets a specified need; and

(B) use specified design processes to develop and communicate his/her ideas.

(3) The student investigates emerging and innovative architectural construction technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative architectural construction technologies; and

(B) conduct research and experimentation in architectural construction technology to determine its effectiveness.

(4) The student describes quality and how it is measured in architectural construction. The student is expected to:

(A) construct items that meet a specified level of quality;

(B) recommend where and how the quality of a building can be improved; and

(C) explain the factors that affect the quality of buildings.

(5) The student constructs buildings using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the chemical, mechanical and physical properties and standard units of measure of architectural construction materials, such as concrete, masonry, and metals;

(B) describe the processes used in architectural construction;

(C) use a variety of tools, equipment, and machines to construct buildings; and

(D) construct a building or model of a building.

(6) The student works safely with architectural construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes correctly;

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately; and

(E) recommend improvements in safety procedures.

(7) The student performs basic maintenance on selected construction equipment and machines. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly;

(B) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C) develop a maintenance plan for selected machines and equipment.

(8) The student manages an architectural construction technology project. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing an architectural construction technology project;

(B) identify and describe the resources required to complete a construction project; and

(C) develop a timeline for completing a project.

(9) The student follows the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to architectural construction technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), private industry, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required;

(B) locate the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations; and

(C) interpret and follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(10) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to architectural construction. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a building or structure by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(11) The student determines the cost of constructing a building. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for an architectural construction a project; and

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs.

(12) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to architectural construction activities. The student is expected to:

(A) write technical reports;

(B) make technical presentations to groups of individuals;

(C) identify and use mathematics concepts in architectural construction technology; and

(D) identify and apply science principles used in architectural construction technology.

(13) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.66 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.67. Electricity/Electronics Technology (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Energy, Power, and Transportation Systems.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student selects and uses the appropriate resources to solve electrical or electronic problems. The student is expected to:

(A) apply electrical or electronic technology to individual or community problems; and

(B) describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of electrical or electronic products.

(2) The student designs an electrical or electronic device using the appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve an electrical or electronic device that meets a specified need; and

(B) use specified design processes and techniques to develop and communicate his/her ideas.

(3) The student investigates emerging and innovative electrical or electronic technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) use emerging and innovative electrical or electronic technologies; and

(B) conduct research and experimentation in electrical or electronic technology to determine its effectiveness.

(4) The student describes quality and how it is measured in electricity and electronics. The student is expected to:

(A) produce devices that meet a specified level of quality;

(B) recommend where and how the quality of an item can be improved; and

(C) explain the factors that affect the quality of products.

(5) The student builds electrical or electronic products or systems using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the electrical, mechanical and physical properties of electrical or electronic materials;

(B) describe the processes used in electricity or electronics, such as conversion, control, transmission, and storage;

(C) use a variety of electrical and electronic tools, equipment, and machines; and

(D) construct an electrical or electronic item.

(6) The student works safely with tools, equipment, machines, and materials used in electrical or electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes;

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately; and

(E) recommend improvements in safety procedures.

(7) The student demonstrates proper electrical or electronic equipment maintenance. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly;

(B) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C) describe the results of negligent or improper maintenance.

(8) The student manages an electrical or electronic technology project or system. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing an electrical or electronic technology project;

(B) identify and describe the resources required to complete a project; and

(C) develop a timeline for completing a project.

(9) The student follows the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to electrical or electronic technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required;

(B) locate the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations; and

(C) interpret and follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(10) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to electrical or electronics technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(11) The student describes the factors that influence the cost of electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for electrical or electronic projects; and

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs.

(12) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to electrical or electronic activities. The student is expected to:

(A) write technical reports;

(B) make technical presentations to groups of people;

(C) use mathematics concepts in electrical or electronic technology; and

(D) identify and apply science principles used in electrical or electronic technology.

(13) The student describes basic product marketing processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(14) The student investigates career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in electrical or electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A) identify an area of interest in electricity or electronics, and investigate its entry-level and advancement requirements and its growth potential; and

(B) describe the types of career opportunities available in electricity or electronics.

(15) The student identifies and practices teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.67 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.68. Computer Multimedia and Animation Technology (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. The recommended prerequisite for this course is a technology applications credit.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student selects and uses multimedia communication and animation technology to meet specific needs. The student is expected to:

(A) apply multimedia communication and animation technology to individual or community problems;

(B) describe the factors that affect the use and interpretation of communication products; and

(C) identify and describe the roles of communication, such as informing, persuading, and educating.

(2) The student designs multimedia communication and animation products using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve communication products that meet specified needs; and

(B) identify areas where quality can be designed into multimedia communication and animation products, services, and systems.

(3) The student investigates emerging and innovative multimedia communication and animation technologies. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative multimedia communication and animation technologies; and

(B) conduct research and experimentation in multimedia communication and animation technology to determine its effectiveness.

(4) The student describes quality and how it is measured in multimedia communication and animation technology. The student is expected to:

(A) produce items that meet a specified quality level;

(B) recommend how the quality of a product can be improved; and

(C) explain the factors that affect the quality of products.

(5) The student produces multimedia communication and animation products using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials, and processes. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the characteristics and properties of multimedia communication and animation materials;

(B) describe the processes used in multimedia communication and animation systems;

(C) use a variety of tools, equipment, and machines; and

(D) produce communication items.

(6) The student works safely with multimedia communication and animation technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes correctly; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(7) The student demonstrates proper equipment maintenance in multimedia communication and animation technology. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools, equipment, and materials properly; and

(B) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines.

(8) The student manages a multimedia communication and animation technology project. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a plan for completing a multimedia communication and animation project;

(B) identify and describe the resources required to complete a project; and

(C) develop a timeline for completing a project.

(9) The student follows the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to communication technology, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required;

(B) follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations; and

(C) locate the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(10) The student demonstrates the ability to solve problems, think critically, and make decisions. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques.

(11) The student determines the cost of producing multimedia communication and animation products. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for a communication product; and

(B) determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs.

(12) The student applies communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to communication activities. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts in communication technology; and

(C) identify and apply science principles used in communication technology.

(13) The student describes the relationship between multimedia communication and marketing. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service using multimedia communication and animation techniques; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(14) The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A) describe how teams function;

(B) use teamwork to solve problems;

(C) distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D) identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E) identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F) define discrimination, harassment, and equality;

(G) use time management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H) complete his/her work according to established criteria.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.68 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

Chapter 123. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education

Subchapter F. Scientific, High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter F issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

123.81. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education, Scientific, High School.

The provisions of Chapter 123, Subchapters C-G, shall supersede 75.85 of this title (relating to Industrial Technology Education) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.81 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.82. Principles of Technology I (One Science Credit).

(a) General requirements. The prerequisites for this course are one course in science and Algebra I. To receive credit in science, students must meet the 40% laboratory and fieldwork requirement identified in 74.3(b)(2)(C) of this title (relating to Description of a Required Secondary Curriculum). This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12.

(b) Introduction.

(1) Science is a way of learning about the natural world. Students should know how science has built a vast body of changing and increasing knowledge described by physical, mathematical, and conceptual models, and that science may not answer all questions.

(2) A system is a collection of cycles, structures, and processes that interact. Students should understand a whole in terms of its components and how these components relate to each other and to the whole. All systems have basic properties that can be described in terms of space, time, energy and matter. Change and constancy occur in systems and can be observed and measured as patterns. These patterns help to predict what will happen next and can change over time.

(3) Investigations are used to learn about the natural world through questioning, observing and drawing conclusions. Students should understand that certain types of questions can be answered by investigations, and that conclusions and models built from these investigations change as new observations are made. Models of objects and events are tools for understanding the natural world and can show how systems work. They have limitations and based on new discoveries are constantly being changed to more closely reflect the physical world.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student uses a systems approach to investigate mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal systems. The student is expected to:

(A) apply the universal systems model to technological activities; and

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with each of the systems.

(2) The student works safely with mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements; and

(C) make prudent choices in the conservation and use of resources and the disposal of materials.

(3) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to technology. The student is expected to:

(A) use specified problem-solving strategies;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies;

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions; and

(D) evaluate the impact of technology on scientific thought, society, and the environment.

(4) The student applies communication, science, and mathematics knowledge and skills to technological activities. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare technical reports and presentations;

(B) solve algebraic equations;

(C) solve problems in English and System International (SI) units; and

(D) perform unit conversions.

(5) The student knows the laws governing motion. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze examples of uniform and accelerated motion, including linear, projectile, and circular motion;

(B) generate and interpret graphs describing motion, including the use of real time technology;

(C) formulate the effects of forces on the motion of objects;

(D) develop and interpret a free-body diagram for force analysis; and

(E) identify and describe motion relative to different frames of reference.

(6) The student knows the concept of force. The student is expected to:

(A) apply examples of complex technological devices where force must be controlled, measured or applied;

(B) analyze the relationship among force, pressure, voltage and temperature;

(C) evaluate and predict what happens to an object when forces on it are balanced and when forces on it are unbalanced; and

(D) measure force in mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal systems.

(7) The student knows the concept of work. The student is expected to:

(A) relate mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems to force and movement; and

(B) identify and measure the effects of work done in mechanical, fluid and electrical systems.

(8) The student knows the concept of rate. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze rate in mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal systems; and

(B) measure, verify, and analyze rate in mechanical, fluid, electrical and thermal systems.

(9) The student knows the concept of resistance. The student is expected to:

(A) identify resistance in mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal energy systems;

(B) relate the principle of force divided by rate to resistance in each energy system; and

(C) measure, verify, and analyze resistance in mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal energy systems.

(10) The student knows the concept of energy. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the nature of energy;

(B) relate potential energy, kinetic energy and heat energy to the conservation of energy;

(C) distinguish between work and energy;

(D) measure, verify, and analyze energy in each system; and

(E) evaluate different methods of energy transfer that result in an increasing amount of disorder.

(11) The student knows the concept of power. The student is expected to:

(A) define power in mechanical, fluid, electrical and thermal systems; and

(B) relate the principle of work divided by time to each energy system.

(12) The student knows the concept of energy transformation. The student is expected to:

(A) observe and describe examples of kinetic and potential energy in mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems; and

(B) compare examples of energy transformations in mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.82 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.83. Principles of Technology II (One Science Credit).

(a) General requirements. The prerequisite for this course is Principles of Technology I. To receive credit in science, students must meet the 40% laboratory and fieldwork requirement identified in 74.3(b)(2)(C) of this title (relating to Description of a Required Secondary Curriculum). This course is recommended for students in Grades 11-12.

(b) Introduction.

(1) Science is a way of learning about the natural world. Students should know how science has built a vast body of changing and increasing knowledge described by physical, mathematical, and conceptual models, and that science may not answer all questions.

(2) A system is a collection of cycles, structures, and processes that interact. Students should understand a whole in terms of its components and how these components relate to each other and to the whole. All systems have basic properties that can be described in terms of space, time, energy and matter. Change and constancy occur in systems and can be observed and measured as patterns. These patterns help to predict what will happen next and can change over time.

(3) Investigations are used to learn about the natural world through questioning, observing and drawing conclusions. Students should understand that certain types of questions can be answered by investigations, and that conclusions and models built from these investigations change as new observations are made. Models of objects and events are tools for understanding the natural world and can show how systems work. They have limitations and based on new discoveries are constantly being changed to more closely reflect the physical world.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student uses a systems approach to investigate mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal systems. The student is expected to:

(A) apply the universal systems model to technological activities; and

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with each of the systems.

(2) The student works safely with mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C) identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D) dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(3) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to technology. The student is expected to:

(A) use problem-solving strategies;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies;

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions; and

(D) evaluate the impact of technology on scientific thought, society, and the environment.

(4) The student applies communication, science, and mathematics knowledge and skills to technological activities. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare technical reports and presentations;

(B) solve algebraic equations;

(C) solve problems in English and System International (SI) units; and

(D) perform unit conversions.

(5) The student knows the laws governing motion. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze examples of uniform and accelerated motion, including linear, projectile, and circular motion;

(B) evaluate the effects of forces on the motion of objects;

(C) develop and interpret a free-body diagram for force analysis; and

(D) analyze motion relative to different frames of reference.

(6) The student knows the concept of momentum. The student is expected to:

(A) identify linear and angular momentum; and

(B) relate the conservation of momentum to linear and angular motion.

(7) The student knows the concept of waves and vibrations. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and evaluate characteristics of wave motion; and

(B) demonstrate how waves transmit energy.

(8) The student knows the concept of energy conversion. The student is expected to:

(A) evaluate the purpose of energy converters;

(B) identify converters that change one form of energy to another; and

(C) evaluate the efficiency of converting energy from one form to another.

(9) The student knows the concept of energy transduction. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the function of a transducer;

(B) distinguish between an energy converter and a transducer; and

(C) identify transducers that change energy signals from one form to another.

(10) The student knows the concept of radiant energy. The student is expected to:

(A) describe radiation and cite examples;

(B) compare fission and fusion in terms of end products, energy, advantages, and availability; and

(C) compare and contrast different types of radioactive decay.

(11) The student knows the concept of light and optics. The student is expected to:

(A) identify characteristics of optical devices;

(B) analyze the characteristics of light including reflection, refraction, and interference; and

(C) interpret the effects of wave characteristics in daily applications, such as lasers and optics in industrial and medical technology.

(12) The student knows the concept of time constants. The student is expected to:

(A) define a time constant; and

(B) distinguish between a linear and non-linear increase and decrease of a variable with time.

 

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.83 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

Chapter 123. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education

Subchapter G. Research, High School

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter G issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.

123.91. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education, Research, High School.

The provisions of Chapter 123, Subchapters C-G, shall supersede 75.85 of this title (relating to Industrial Technology Education) beginning September 1, 1998.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.91 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.92. Research, Design, and Development - Independent Study (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. The prerequisites for this course are two technology education courses in an approved coherent sequence. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11-12.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student uses a systems approach for conducting technological research, design, and development activities. The student is expected to:

(A) describe and use the scientific method, technological method, or universal systems model to conduct a research activity; and

(B) identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with research, design, and development activities.

(2) The student selects the appropriate technological resources to conduct research, design, and development activities. The student is expected to:

(A) apply technology to individual or community problems;

(B) describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of items;

(C) differentiate between, research, design, and development; and

(D) distinguish between adaptation, imitation, innovation, and invention.

(3) The student designs or improves a product using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product or service that meets a specified need;

(B) identify areas where quality, reliability, and safety can be designed into a product;

(C) describe the functions and methodologies used in basic and applied research; and

(D) develop a project portfolio that documents a research and development project.

(4) The student predicts the effects of emerging and innovative applications of technology. The student is expected to:

(A) report on emerging and innovative technologies; and

(B) describe the factors that influence the adoption of technology.

(5) The student builds products or systems using the appropriate technological resources. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the properties of selected materials, such as molecular structure, strength properties, and surface properties;

(B) safely and efficiently use a variety of tools, equipment, machines and materials; and

(C) build models, mockups, or prototypes.

(6) The student works safely with technology. The student is expected to:

(A) master relevant safety tests;

(B) follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements; and

(C) identify and dispose of hazardous materials and wastes correctly.

(7) The student describes the importance of maintenance. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly; and

(B) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines.

(8) The student manages a research and development project. The student is expected to:

(A) organize and complete a research and design project; and

(B) develop a timeline for the completion of a project.

(9) The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to a research and development project, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), standard symbols, and line weights. The student is expected to:

(A) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required;

(B) locate the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations; and

(C) interpret and follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(10) The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of a research project; and

(B) describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments.

(11) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to research, design, and development. The student is expected to:

(A) develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B) apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C) apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(12) The student describes the costs associated with research and development activities. The student is expected to:

(A) develop a budget for a research and development project; and

(B) determine the most effective way to minimize project costs.

(13) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to research and development projects. The student is expected to:

(A) use written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B) use mathematics concepts; and

(C) identify and apply science principles used in his/her project.

(14) The student describes the relationships between marketing and research and development. The student is expected to:

(A) prepare a marketing plan for a(n) idea, product, or service; and

(B) discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.92 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.

123.93. Problems and Solutions in Technology - Independent Study (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements. The prerequisites for this course are two technology education courses in an approved coherent sequence. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11-12.

(b) Introduction. In Technology Education, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of technology, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. In addition to their general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in technology and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student uses advanced tools, materials, processes, and procedures in bio-related technology, computer applications, construction, communications, manufacturing, or energy, power and transportation. The student is expected to:

(A) determine and use the appropriate technology needed to solve a problem or complete a task;

(B) evaluate the use of technology in a given situation; and

(C) describe the factors that influence the use of technology in a variety of situations.

(2) The student designs a product using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) use an accepted design process to design an object or service;

(B) develop drawings, illustrations, or models; and

(C) establish design criteria and constraints.

(3) The student predicts the impacts of emerging and innovative applications of technology. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the emerging and innovative technologies being developed in a field; and

(B) identify the factors that may influence the adoption of emerging and innovative technologies.

(4) The student improves the quality of a product or service using different quality control techniques. The student is expected to:

(A) define quality;

(B) assess the quality of specific products and services; and

(C) determine how the quality of a product or service can be improved.

(5) The student recommends new ways to build products using different tools, equipment, machines, materials, and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A) use a variety of tools, equipment, machines, materials, and processes to build products in a more efficient manner; and

(B) develop advanced technological skills.

(6) The student designs and builds safety devices required to complete different tasks. The student is expected to:

(A) recommend improvements to safety standards; and

(B) construct safety devices that allow for the safe completion of a task.

(7) The student performs advanced equipment maintenance. The student is expected to:

(A) handle and store tools and materials correctly;

(B) locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C) describe the results of negligent or improper maintenance.

(8) The student develops a management plan for a project or activity. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and describe the steps required to complete a project;

(B) determine and acquire the resources needed to complete a project; and

(C) develop a timeline to complete a project.

(9) The student identifies and follows the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), National Electrical Code (NEC), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), and standard symbols. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations;

(B) identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required; and

(C) interpret and follow the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(10) The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to technology. The student is expected to:

(A) use an established problem-solving strategy;

(B) evaluate multiple solutions to a single problem; and

(C) recommend and justify a course of action for solving a problem.

(11) The student suggests how the cost of a product or service can be reduced. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the factors that influence the cost of a product or service; and

(B) select materials or processes that will reduce the cost of producing the product or delivering the service.

(12) The student applies his/her communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to technological activities. The student is expected to:

(A) write technical reports;

(B) deliver technical presentations to groups of individuals;

(C) identify and describe the mathematics concepts used in his/her projects; and

(D) identify and describe the science concepts used in his/her projects.

(13) The student predicts the marketability of an item. The student is expected to:

(A) determine the customer's expectations concerning a product or service;

(B) evaluate a product or service to determine if it will meet the customer's expectations; and

(C) deliver a product or service and assesses the customer's responses.

 

Source: The provisions of this 123.93 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 5079.