Chapter 110. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for English Language Arts and Reading
Subchapter A. Elementary


Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter A issued under the Texas Education Code, 7.102(c)(4) and §28.002, unless otherwise noted.


110.10. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for English Language Arts and Reading, Elementary, Beginning with School Year 2009-2010.

(a)  The provisions of 110.11-110.16 of this subchapter shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2009-2010 school year.

(b)  Students must develop the ability to comprehend and process material from a wide range of texts. Student expectations for Reading/Comprehension Skills as provided in this subsection are described for the appropriate grade level.

Figure: 19 TAC 110.10(b)

Source: The provisions of this 110.10 adopted to be effective September 4, 2008, 33 TexReg 7162; amended to be effective February 22, 2010, 35 TexReg 1462.


110.11. English Language Arts and Reading, Kindergarten, Beginning with School Year 2009-2010.

(a)  Introduction.

(1)  The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The Reading strand is structured to reflect the major topic areas of the National Reading Panel Report. In Kindergarten, students engage in activities that build on their natural curiosity and prior knowledge to develop their reading, writing, and oral language skills.

(2)  For students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition.

(A)  English language learners (ELLs) are acquiring English, learning content in English, and learning to read simultaneously. For this reason, it is imperative that reading instruction should be comprehensive and that students receive instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, and word attack skills while simultaneously being taught academic vocabulary and comprehension skills and strategies. Reading instruction that enhances ELL's ability to decode unfamiliar words and to make sense of those words in context will expedite their ability to make sense of what they read and learn from reading. Additionally, developing fluency, spelling, and grammatical conventions of academic language must be done in meaningful contexts and not in isolation.

(B)  For ELLs, comprehension of texts requires additional scaffolds to support comprehensible input. ELL students should use the knowledge of their first language (e.g., cognates) to further vocabulary development. Vocabulary needs to be taught in the context of connected discourse so that language is meaningful. ELLs must learn how rhetorical devices in English differ from those in their native language. At the same time English learners are learning in English, the focus is on academic English, concepts, and the language structures specific to the content.

(C)  During initial stages of English development, ELLs are expected to meet standards in a second language that many monolingual English speakers find difficult to meet in their native language. However, English language learners' abilities to meet these standards will be influenced by their proficiency in English. While English language learners can analyze, synthesize, and evaluate, their level of English proficiency may impede their ability to demonstrate this knowledge during the initial stages of English language acquisition. It is also critical to understand that ELLs with no previous or with interrupted schooling will require explicit and strategic support as they acquire English and learn to learn in English simultaneously.

(3)  To meet Public Education Goal 1 of the Texas Education Code, 4.002, which states, "The students in the public education system will demonstrate exemplary performance in the reading and writing of the English language," students will accomplish the essential knowledge, skills, and student expectations at Kindergarten as described in subsection (b) of this section.

(4)  To meet Texas Education Code, 28.002(h), which states, "... each school district shall foster the continuation of the tradition of teaching United States and Texas history and the free enterprise system in regular subject matter and in reading courses and in the adoption of textbooks," students will be provided oral and written narratives as well as other informational texts that can help them to become thoughtful, active citizens who appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation.

(b)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Print Awareness. Students understand how English is written and printed. Students are expected to:

(A)  recognize that spoken words can be represented by print for communication;

(B)  identify upper- and lower-case letters;

(C)  demonstrate the one-to-one correspondence between a spoken word and a printed word in text;

(D)  recognize the difference between a letter and a printed word;

(E)  recognize that sentences are comprised of words separated by spaces and demonstrate the awareness of word boundaries (e.g., through kinesthetic or tactile actions such as clapping and jumping);

(F)  hold a book right side up, turn its pages correctly, and know that reading moves from top to bottom and left to right; and

(G)  identify different parts of a book (e.g., front and back covers, title page).

(2)  Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonological Awareness. Students display phonological awareness. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify a sentence made up of a group of words;

(B)  identify syllables in spoken words;

(C)  orally generate rhymes in response to spoken words (e.g., "What rhymes with hat?");

(D)  distinguish orally presented rhyming pairs of words from non-rhyming pairs;

(E)  recognize spoken alliteration or groups of words that begin with the same spoken onset or initial sound (e.g., "baby boy bounces the ball");

(F)  blend spoken onsets and rimes to form simple words (e.g., onset/c/ and rime/at/ make cat);

(G)  blend spoken phonemes to form one-syllable words (e.g.,/m/ /a/ /n/ says man);

(H)  isolate the initial sound in one-syllable spoken words; and

(I)  segment spoken one-syllable words into two to three phonemes (e.g., dog:/d/ /o/ /g/).

(3)  Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify the common sounds that letters represent;

(B)  use knowledge of letter-sound relationships to decode regular words in text and independent of content (e.g., VC, CVC, CCVC, and CVCC words);

(C)  recognize that new words are created when letters are changed, added, or deleted; and

(D)  identify and read at least 25 high-frequency words from a commonly used list.

(4)  Reading/Beginning Reading/Strategies. Students comprehend a variety of texts drawing on useful strategies as needed. Students are expected to:

(A)  predict what might happen next in text based on the cover, title, and illustrations; and

(B)  ask and respond to questions about texts read aloud.

(5)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it correctly when reading and writing. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify and use words that name actions, directions, positions, sequences, and locations;

(B)  recognize that compound words are made up of shorter words;

(C)  identify and sort pictures of objects into conceptual categories (e.g., colors, shapes, textures); and

(D)  use a picture dictionary to find words.

(6)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify elements of a story including setting, character, and key events;

(B)  discuss the big idea (theme) of a well-known folktale or fable and connect it to personal experience;

(C)  recognize sensory details; and

(D)  recognize recurring phrases and characters in traditional fairy tales, lullabies, and folktales from various cultures.

(7)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to respond to rhythm and rhyme in poetry through identifying a regular beat and similarities in word sounds.

(8)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  retell a main event from a story read aloud; and

(B)  describe characters in a story and the reasons for their actions.

(9)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the topic of an informational text heard.

(10)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text, and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify the topic and details in expository text heard or read, referring to the words and/or illustrations;

(B)  retell important facts in a text, heard or read;

(C)  discuss the ways authors group information in text; and

(D)  use titles and illustrations to make predictions about text.

(11)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow pictorial directions (e.g., recipes, science experiments); and

(B)  identify the meaning of specific signs (e.g., traffic signs, warning signs).

(12)  Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students (with adult assistance) are expected to:

(A)  identify different forms of media (e.g., advertisements, newspapers, radio programs); and

(B)  identify techniques used in media (e.g., sound, movement).

(13)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students (with adult assistance) are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by generating ideas for writing through class discussion;

(B)  develop drafts by sequencing the action or details in the story;

(C)  revise drafts by adding details or sentences;

(D)  edit drafts by leaving spaces between letters and words; and

(E)  share writing with others.

(14)  Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:

(A)  dictate or write sentences to tell a story and put the sentences in chronological sequence; and

(B)  write short poems.

(15)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to dictate or write information for lists, captions, or invitations.

(16)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  understand and use the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking (with adult assistance):

(i)  past and future tenses when speaking;

(ii)  nouns (singular/plural);

(iii)  descriptive words;

(iv)  prepositions and simple prepositional phrases appropriately when speaking or writing (e.g., in, on, under, over); and

(v)  pronouns (e.g., I, me);

(B)  speak in complete sentences to communicate; and

(C)  use complete simple sentences.

(17)  Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:

(A)  form upper- and lower-case letters legibly using the basic conventions of print (left-to-right and top-to-bottom progression);

(B)  capitalize the first letter in a sentence; and

(C)  use punctuation at the end of a sentence.

(18)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:

(A)  use phonological knowledge to match sounds to letters;

(B)  use letter-sound correspondences to spell consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words (e.g., "cut"); and

(C)  write one's own name.

(19)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students (with adult assistance) are expected to:

(A)  ask questions about topics of class-wide interest; and

(B)  decide what sources or people in the classroom, school, library, or home can answer these questions.

(20)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students (with adult assistance) are expected to:

(A)  gather evidence from provided text sources; and

(B)  use pictures in conjunction with writing when documenting research.

(21)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  listen attentively by facing speakers and asking questions to clarify information; and

(B)  follow oral directions that involve a short related sequence of actions.

(22)  Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to share information and ideas by speaking audibly and clearly using the conventions of language.

(23)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to follow agreed-upon rules for discussion, including taking turns and speaking one at a time.

Source: The provisions of this 110.11 adopted to be effective September 4, 2008, 33 TexReg 7162.


110.12. English Language Arts and Reading, Grade 1, Beginning with School Year 2009-2010.

(a)  Introduction.

(1)  The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The Reading strand is structured to reflect the major topic areas of the National Reading Panel Report. In first grade, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills. Students should write and read (or be read to) on a daily basis.

(2)  For students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition.

(A)  English language learners (ELLs) are acquiring English, learning content in English, and learning to read simultaneously. For this reason, it is imperative that reading instruction should be comprehensive and that students receive instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, and word attack skills while simultaneously being taught academic vocabulary and comprehension skills and strategies. Reading instruction that enhances ELL's ability to decode unfamiliar words and to make sense of those words in context will expedite their ability to make sense of what they read and learn from reading. Additionally, developing fluency, spelling, and grammatical conventions of academic language must be done in meaningful contexts and not in isolation.

(B)  For ELLs, comprehension of texts requires additional scaffolds to support comprehensible input. ELL students should use the knowledge of their first language (e.g., cognates) to further vocabulary development. Vocabulary needs to be taught in the context of connected discourse so that language is meaningful. ELLs must learn how rhetorical devices in English differ from those in their native language. At the same time English learners are learning in English, the focus is on academic English, concepts, and the language structures specific to the content.

(C)  During initial stages of English development, ELLs are expected to meet standards in a second language that many monolingual English speakers find difficult to meet in their native language. However, English language learners' abilities to meet these standards will be influenced by their proficiency in English. While English language learners can analyze, synthesize, and evaluate, their level of English proficiency may impede their ability to demonstrate this knowledge during the initial stages of English language acquisition. It is also critical to understand that ELLs with no previous or with interrupted schooling will require explicit and strategic support as they acquire English and learn to learn in English simultaneously.

(3)  To meet Public Education Goal 1 of the Texas Education Code, 4.002, which states, "The students in the public education system will demonstrate exemplary performance in the reading and writing of the English language," students will accomplish the essential knowledge, skills, and student expectations in Grade 1 as described in subsection (b) of this section.

(4)  To meet Texas Education Code, 28.002(h), which states, "... each school district shall foster the continuation of the tradition of teaching United States and Texas history and the free enterprise system in regular subject matter and in reading courses and in the adoption of textbooks," students will be provided oral and written narratives as well as other informational texts that can help them to become thoughtful, active citizens who appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation.

(b)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Print Awareness. Students understand how English is written and printed. Students are expected to:

(A)  recognize that spoken words are represented in written English by specific sequences of letters;

(B)  identify upper- and lower-case letters;

(C)  sequence the letters of the alphabet;

(D)  recognize the distinguishing features of a sentence (e.g., capitalization of first word, ending punctuation);

(E)  read texts by moving from top to bottom of the page and tracking words from left to right with return sweep; and

(F)  identify the information that different parts of a book provide (e.g., title, author, illustrator, table of contents).

(2)  Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonological Awareness. Students display phonological awareness. Students are expected to:

(A)  orally generate a series of original rhyming words using a variety of phonograms (e.g., -ake, -ant, -ain) and consonant blends (e.g., bl, st, tr);

(B)  distinguish between long- and short-vowel sounds in spoken one-syllable words (e.g., bit/bite);

(C)  recognize the change in a spoken word when a specified phoneme is added, changed, or removed (e.g.,/b/l/o/w/ to/g/l/o/w/);

(D)  blend spoken phonemes to form one- and two-syllable words, including consonant blends (e.g., spr);

(E)  isolate initial, medial, and final sounds in one-syllable spoken words; and

(F)  segment spoken one-syllable words of three to five phonemes into individual phonemes (e.g., splat =/s/p/l/a/t/).

(3)  Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:

(A)  decode words in context and in isolation by applying common letter-sound correspondences, including:

(i)  single letters (consonants) including b, c=/k/, c=/s/, d, f, g=/g/ (hard), g=/j/ (soft), h, j, k, l, m, n, p, qu=/kw/, r, s=/s/, s=/z/, t, v, w, x=/ks/, y, and z;

(ii)  single letters (vowels) including short a, short e, short i, short o, short u, long a (a-e), long e (e), long i (i-e), long o (o-e), long u (u-e), y=long e, and y=long i;

(iii)  consonant blends (e.g., bl, st);

(iv)  consonant digraphs including ch, tch, sh, th=as in thing, wh, ng, ck, kn, -dge, and ph;

(v)  vowel digraphs including oo as in foot, oo as in moon, ea as in eat, ea as in bread, ee, ow as in how, ow as in snow, ou as in out, ay,ai, aw, au, ew, oa, ie as in chief, ie as in pie, and -igh; and

(vi)  vowel diphthongs including oy, oi, ou, and ow;

(B)  combine sounds from letters and common spelling patterns (e.g., consonant blends, long- and short-vowel patterns) to create recognizable words;

(C)  use common syllabication patterns to decode words, including:

(i)  closed syllable (CVC) (e.g., mat, rab-bit);

(ii)  open syllable (CV) (e.g., he, ba-by);

(iii)  final stable syllable (e.g., ap-ple, a-ble);

(iv)  vowel-consonant-silent "e" words (VCe) (e.g., kite, hide);

(v)  vowel digraphs and diphthongs (e.g., boy-hood, oat-meal); and

(vi)  r-controlled vowel sounds (e.g., tar); including er, ir, ur, ar, and or);

(D)  decode words with common spelling patterns (e.g., -ink, -onk, -ick);

(E)  read base words with inflectional endings (e.g., plurals, past tenses);

(F)  use knowledge of the meaning of base words to identify and read common compound words (e.g., football, popcorn, daydream);

(G)  identify and read contractions (e.g., isn't, can't);

(H)  identify and read at least 100 high-frequency words from a commonly used list; and

(I)  monitor accuracy of decoding.

(4)  Reading/Beginning Reading/Strategies. Students comprehend a variety of texts drawing on useful strategies as needed. Students are expected to:

(A)  confirm predictions about what will happen next in text by "reading the part that tells";

(B)  ask relevant questions, seek clarification, and locate facts and details about stories and other texts; and

(C)  establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e.g., identifying clues, using background knowledge, generating questions, re-reading a portion aloud).

(5)  Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to read aloud grade-level appropriate text with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.

(6)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify words that name actions (verbs) and words that name persons, places, or things (nouns);

(B)  determine the meaning of compound words using knowledge of the meaning of their individual component words (e.g., lunchtime);

(C)  determine what words mean from how they are used in a sentence, either heard or read;

(D)  identify and sort words into conceptual categories (e.g., opposites, living things); and

(E)  alphabetize a series of words to the first or second letter and use a dictionary to find words.

(7)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  connect the meaning of a well-known story or fable to personal experiences; and

(B)  explain the function of recurring phrases (e.g., "Once upon a time" or "They lived happily ever after") in traditional folk- and fairy tales.

(8)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to respond to and use rhythm, rhyme, and alliteration in poetry.

(9)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  describe the plot (problem and solution) and retell a story's beginning, middle, and end with attention to the sequence of events; and

(B)  describe characters in a story and the reasons for their actions and feelings.

(10)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and respond by providing evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to determine whether a story is true or a fantasy and explain why.

(11)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to recognize sensory details in literary text.

(12)  Reading/Comprehension of Text/Independent Reading. Students read independently for sustained periods of time and produce evidence of their reading. Students are expected to read independently for a sustained period of time.

(13)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the topic and explain the author's purpose in writing about the text.

(14)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  restate the main idea, heard or read;

(B)  identify important facts or details in text, heard or read;

(C)  retell the order of events in a text by referring to the words and/or illustrations; and

(D)  use text features (e.g., title, tables of contents, illustrations) to locate specific information in text.

(15)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow written multi-step directions with picture cues to assist with understanding; and

(B)  explain the meaning of specific signs and symbols (e.g., map features).

(16)  Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:

(A)  recognize different purposes of media (e.g., informational, entertainment) (with adult assistance); and

(B)  identify techniques used in media (e.g., sound, movement).

(17)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by generating ideas for writing (e.g., drawing, sharing ideas, listing key ideas);

(B)  develop drafts by sequencing ideas through writing sentences;

(C)  revise drafts by adding or deleting a word, phrase, or sentence;

(D)  edit drafts for grammar, punctuation, and spelling using a teacher-developed rubric; and

(E)  publish and share writing with others.

(18)  Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:

(A)  write brief stories that include a beginning, middle, and end; and

(B)  write short poems that convey sensory details.

(19)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

(A)  write brief compositions about topics of interest to the student;

(B)  write short letters that put ideas in a chronological or logical sequence and use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing); and

(C)  write brief comments on literary or informational texts.

(20)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  understand and use the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:

(i)  verbs (past, present, and future);

(ii)  nouns (singular/plural, common/proper);

(iii)  adjectives (e.g., descriptive: green, tall);

(iv)  adverbs (e.g., time: before, next);

(v)  prepositions and prepositional phrases;

(vi)  pronouns (e.g., I, me); and

(vii)  time-order transition words;

(B)  speak in complete sentences with correct subject-verb agreement; and

(C)  ask questions with appropriate subject-verb inversion.

(21)  Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:

(A)  form upper- and lower-case letters legibly in text, using the basic conventions of print (left-to-right and top-to-bottom progression), including spacing between words and sentences;

(B)  recognize and use basic capitalization for:

(i)  the beginning of sentences;

(ii)  the pronoun "I"; and

(iii)  names of people; and

(C)  recognize and use punctuation marks at the end of declarative, exclamatory, and interrogative sentences.

(22)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:

(A)  use phonological knowledge to match sounds to letters to construct known words;

(B)  use letter-sound patterns to spell:

(i)  consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words;

(ii)  consonant-vowel-consonant-silent e (CVCe) words (e.g., "hope"); and

(iii)  one-syllable words with consonant blends (e.g., "drop");

(C)  spell high-frequency words from a commonly used list;

(D)  spell base words with inflectional endings (e.g., adding "s" to make words plurals); and

(E)  use resources to find correct spellings.

(23)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students (with adult assistance) are expected to:

(A)  generate a list of topics of class-wide interest and formulate open-ended questions about one or two of the topics; and

(B)  decide what sources of information might be relevant to answer these questions.

(24)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students (with adult assistance) are expected to:

(A)  gather evidence from available sources (natural and personal) as well as from interviews with local experts;

(B)  use text features (e.g., table of contents, alphabetized index) in age-appropriate reference works (e.g., picture dictionaries) to locate information; and

(C)  record basic information in simple visual formats (e.g., notes, charts, picture graphs, diagrams).

(25)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students (with adult assistance) are expected to revise the topic as a result of answers to initial research questions.

(26)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students (with adult assistance) are expected to create a visual display or dramatization to convey the results of the research.

(27)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  listen attentively to speakers and ask relevant questions to clarify information; and

(B)  follow, restate, and give oral instructions that involve a short related sequence of actions.

(28)  Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to share information and ideas about the topic under discussion, speaking clearly at an appropriate pace, using the conventions of language.

(29)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to follow agreed-upon rules for discussion, including listening to others, speaking when recognized, and making appropriate contributions.

Source: The provisions of this 110.12 adopted to be effective September 4, 2008, 33 TexReg 7162.


110.13. English Language Arts and Reading, Grade 2, Beginning with School Year 2009-2010.

(a)  Introduction.

(1)  The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The Reading strand is structured to reflect the major topic areas of the National Reading Panel Report. In second grade, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills. Students should write and read (or be read to) on a daily basis.

(2)  For students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition.

(A)  English language learners (ELLs) are acquiring English, learning content in English, and learning to read simultaneously. For this reason, it is imperative that reading instruction should be comprehensive and that students receive instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, and word attack skills while simultaneously being taught academic vocabulary and comprehension skills and strategies. Reading instruction that enhances ELL's ability to decode unfamiliar words and to make sense of those words in context will expedite their ability to make sense of what they read and learn from reading. Additionally, developing fluency, spelling, and grammatical conventions of academic language must be done in meaningful contexts and not in isolation.

(B)  For ELLs, comprehension of texts requires additional scaffolds to support comprehensible input. ELL students should use the knowledge of their first language (e.g., cognates) to further vocabulary development. Vocabulary needs to be taught in the context of connected discourse so that language is meaningful. ELLs must learn how rhetorical devices in English differ from those in their native language. At the same time English learners are learning in English, the focus is on academic English, concepts, and the language structures specific to the content.

(C)  During initial stages of English development, ELLs are expected to meet standards in a second language that many monolingual English speakers find difficult to meet in their native language. However, English language learners' abilities to meet these standards will be influenced by their proficiency in English. While English language learners can analyze, synthesize, and evaluate, their level of English proficiency may impede their ability to demonstrate this knowledge during the initial stages of English language acquisition. It is also critical to understand that ELLs with no previous or with interrupted schooling will require explicit and strategic support as they acquire English and learn to learn in English simultaneously.

(3)  To meet Public Education Goal 1 of the Texas Education Code, 4.002, which states, "The students in the public education system will demonstrate exemplary performance in the reading and writing of the English language," students will accomplish the essential knowledge, skills, and student expectations at Grade 2 as described in subsection (b) of this section.

(4)  To meet Texas Education Code, 28.002(h), which states, "... each school district shall foster the continuation of the tradition of teaching United States and Texas history and the free enterprise system in regular subject matter and in reading courses and in the adoption of textbooks," students will be provided oral and written narratives as well as other informational texts that can help them to become thoughtful, active citizens who appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation.

(b)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Print Awareness. Students understand how English is written and printed. Students are expected to distinguish features of a sentence (e.g., capitalization of first word, ending punctuation, commas, quotation marks).

(2)  Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:

(A)  decode multisyllabic words in context and independent of context by applying common letter-sound correspondences including:

(i)  single letters (consonants and vowels);

(ii)  consonant blends (e.g., thr, spl);

(iii)  consonant digraphs (e.g., ng, ck, ph); and

(iv)  vowel digraphs (e.g., ie, ue, ew) and diphthongs (e.g., oi, ou);

(B)  use common syllabication patterns to decode words including:

(i)  closed syllable (CVC) (e.g., pic-nic, mon-ster);

(ii)  open syllable (CV) (e.g., ti-ger);

(iii)  final stable syllable (e.g., sta-tion, tum-ble);

(iv)  vowel-consonant-silent "e" words (VCe) (e.g., in-vite, cape);

(v)  r-controlled vowels (e.g., per-fect, cor-ner); and

(vi)  vowel digraphs and diphthongs (e.g., boy-hood, oat-meal);

(C)  decode words by applying knowledge of common spelling patterns (e.g., -ight, -ant);

(D)  read words with common prefixes (e.g., un-, dis-) and suffixes (e.g., -ly, -less, -ful);

(E)  identify and read abbreviations (e.g., Mr., Ave.);

(F)  identify and read contractions (e.g., haven't, it's);

(G)  identify and read at least 300 high-frequency words from a commonly used list; and

(H)  monitor accuracy of decoding.

(3)  Reading/Beginning Reading/Strategies. Students comprehend a variety of texts drawing on useful strategies as needed. Students are expected to:

(A)  use ideas (e.g., illustrations, titles, topic sentences, key words, and foreshadowing) to make and confirm predictions;

(B)  ask relevant questions, seek clarification, and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text; and

(C)  establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e.g., identifying clues, using background knowledge, generating questions, re-reading a portion aloud).

(4)  Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to read aloud grade-level appropriate text with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.

(5)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:

(A)  use prefixes and suffixes to determine the meaning of words (e.g., allow/disallow);

(B)  use context to determine the relevant meaning of unfamiliar words or multiple-meaning words;

(C)  identify and use common words that are opposite (antonyms) or similar (synonyms) in meaning; and

(D)  alphabetize a series of words and use a dictionary or a glossary to find words.

(6)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify moral lessons as themes in well-known fables, legends, myths, or stories; and

(B)  compare different versions of the same story in traditional and contemporary folktales with respect to their characters, settings, and plot.

(7)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to describe how rhyme, rhythm, and repetition interact to create images in poetry.

(8)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the elements of dialogue and use them in informal plays.

(9)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  describe similarities and differences in the plots and settings of several works by the same author; and

(B)  describe main characters in works of fiction, including their traits, motivations, and feelings.

(10)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and respond by providing evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to distinguish between fiction and nonfiction.

(11)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to recognize that some words and phrases have literal and non-literal meanings (e.g., take steps).

(12)  Reading/Comprehension of Text/Independent Reading. Students read independently for sustained periods of time and produce evidence of their reading. Students are expected to read independently for a sustained period of time and paraphrase what the reading was about, maintaining meaning.

(13)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the topic and explain the author's purpose in writing the text.

(14)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about and understand expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify the main idea in a text and distinguish it from the topic;

(B)  locate the facts that are clearly stated in a text;

(C)  describe the order of events or ideas in a text; and

(D)  use text features (e.g., table of contents, index, headings) to locate specific information in text.

(15)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Text. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow written multi-step directions; and

(B)  use common graphic features to assist in the interpretation of text (e.g., captions, illustrations).

(16)  Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:

(A)  recognize different purposes of media (e.g., informational, entertainment);

(B)  describe techniques used to create media messages (e.g., sound, graphics); and

(C)  identify various written conventions for using digital media (e.g., e-mail, website, video game).

(17)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by generating ideas for writing (e.g., drawing, sharing ideas, listing key ideas);

(B)  develop drafts by sequencing ideas through writing sentences;

(C)  revise drafts by adding or deleting words, phrases, or sentences;

(D)  edit drafts for grammar, punctuation, and spelling using a teacher-developed rubric; and

(E)  publish and share writing with others.

(18)  Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:

(A)  write brief stories that include a beginning, middle, and end; and

(B)  write short poems that convey sensory details.

(19)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

(A)  write brief compositions about topics of interest to the student;

(B)  write short letters that put ideas in a chronological or logical sequence and use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing); and

(C)  write brief comments on literary or informational texts.

(20)  Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write persuasive statements about issues that are important to the student for the appropriate audience in the school, home, or local community.

(21)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  understand and use the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:

(i)  verbs (past, present, and future);

(ii)  nouns (singular/plural, common/proper);

(iii)  adjectives (e.g., descriptive: old, wonderful; articles: a, an, the);

(iv)  adverbs (e.g., time: before, next; manner: carefully, beautifully);

(v)  prepositions and prepositional phrases;

(vi)  pronouns (e.g., he, him); and

(vii)  time-order transition words;

(B)  use complete sentences with correct subject-verb agreement; and

(C)  distinguish among declarative and interrogative sentences.

(22)  Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:

(A)  write legibly leaving appropriate margins for readability;

(B)  use capitalization for:

(i)  proper nouns;

(ii)  months and days of the week; and

(iii)  the salutation and closing of a letter; and

(C)  recognize and use punctuation marks, including:

(i)  ending punctuation in sentences;

(ii)  apostrophes and contractions; and

(iii)  apostrophes and possessives.

(23)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:

(A)  use phonological knowledge to match sounds to letters to construct unknown words;

(B)  spell words with common orthographic patterns and rules:

(i)  complex consonants (e.g., hard and soft c and g, ck);

(ii)  r-controlled vowels;

(iii)  long vowels (e.g., VCe-hope); and

(iv)  vowel digraphs (e.g., oo-book, fool, ee-feet), diphthongs (e.g., ou-out, ow-cow, oi-coil, oy-toy);

(C)  spell high-frequency words from a commonly used list;

(D)  spell base words with inflectional endings (e.g., -ing and -ed);

(E)  spell simple contractions (e.g., isn't, aren't, can't); and

(F)  use resources to find correct spellings.

(24)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:

(A)  generate a list of topics of class-wide interest and formulate open-ended questions about one or two of the topics; and

(B)  decide what sources of information might be relevant to answer these questions.

(25)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

(A)  gather evidence from available sources (natural and personal) as well as from interviews with local experts;

(B)  use text features (e.g., table of contents, alphabetized index, headings) in age-appropriate reference works (e.g., picture dictionaries) to locate information; and

(C)  record basic information in simple visual formats (e.g., notes, charts, picture graphs, diagrams).

(26)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to revise the topic as a result of answers to initial research questions.

(27)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students (with adult assistance) are expected to create a visual display or dramatization to convey the results of the research.

(28)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  listen attentively to speakers and ask relevant questions to clarify information; and

(B)  follow, restate, and give oral instructions that involve a short related sequence of actions.

(29)  Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to share information and ideas that focus on the topic under discussion, speaking clearly at an appropriate pace, using the conventions of language.

(30)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to follow agreed-upon rules for discussion, including listening to others, speaking when recognized, and making appropriate contributions.

Source: The provisions of this 110.13 adopted to be effective September 4, 2008, 33 TexReg 7162.


110.14. English Language Arts and Reading, Grade 3, Beginning with School Year 2009-2010.

(a)  Introduction.

(1)  The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The standards are cumulative--students will continue to address earlier standards as needed while they attend to standards for their grade. In third grade, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills. Students should read and write on a daily basis.

(2)  For students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition.

(A)  English language learners (ELLs) are acquiring English, learning content in English, and learning to read simultaneously. For this reason, it is imperative that reading instruction should be comprehensive and that students receive instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, and word attack skills while simultaneously being taught academic vocabulary and comprehension skills and strategies. Reading instruction that enhances ELL's ability to decode unfamiliar words and to make sense of those words in context will expedite their ability to make sense of what they read and learn from reading. Additionally, developing fluency, spelling, and grammatical conventions of academic language must be done in meaningful contexts and not in isolation.

(B)  For ELLs, comprehension of texts requires additional scaffolds to support comprehensible input. ELL students should use the knowledge of their first language (e.g., cognates) to further vocabulary development. Vocabulary needs to be taught in the context of connected discourse so that language is meaningful. ELLs must learn how rhetorical devices in English differ from those in their native language. At the same time English learners are learning in English, the focus is on academic English, concepts, and the language structures specific to the content.

(C)  During initial stages of English development, ELLs are expected to meet standards in a second language that many monolingual English speakers find difficult to meet in their native language. However, English language learners' abilities to meet these standards will be influenced by their proficiency in English. While English language learners can analyze, synthesize, and evaluate, their level of English proficiency may impede their ability to demonstrate this knowledge during the initial stages of English language acquisition. It is also critical to understand that ELLs with no previous or with interrupted schooling will require explicit and strategic support as they acquire English and learn to learn in English simultaneously.

(3)  To meet Public Education Goal 1 of the Texas Education Code, 4.002, which states, "The students in the public education system will demonstrate exemplary performance in the reading and writing of the English language," students will accomplish the essential knowledge, skills, and student expectations at Grade 3 as described in subsection (b) of this section.

(4)  To meet Texas Education Code, 28.002(h), which states, "... each school district shall foster the continuation of the tradition of teaching United States and Texas history and the free enterprise system in regular subject matter and in reading courses and in the adoption of textbooks," students will be provided oral and written narratives as well as other informational texts that can help them to become thoughtful, active citizens who appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation.

(b)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students are expected to:

(A)  decode multisyllabic words in context and independent of context by applying common spelling patterns including:

(i)  dropping the final "e" and add endings such as -ing, -ed, or -able (e.g., use, using, used, usable);

(ii)  doubling final consonants when adding an ending (e.g., hop to hopping);

(iii)  changing the final "y" to "i" (e.g., baby to babies);

(iv)  using knowledge of common prefixes and suffixes (e.g., dis-, -ly); and

(v)  using knowledge of derivational affixes (e.g., -de, -ful, -able);

(B)  use common syllabication patterns to decode words including:

(i)  closed syllable (CVC) (e.g., mag-net, splen-did);

(ii)  open syllable (CV) (e.g., ve-to);

(iii)  final stable syllable (e.g., puz-zle, con-trac-tion);

(iv)  r-controlled vowels (e.g., fer-ment, car-pool); and

(v)  vowel digraphs and diphthongs (e.g., ei-ther);

(C)  decode words applying knowledge of common spelling patterns (e.g., -eigh, -ought);

(D)  identify and read contractions (e.g., I'd, won't); and

(E)  monitor accuracy in decoding.

(2)  Reading/Beginning Reading/Strategies. Students comprehend a variety of texts drawing on useful strategies as needed. Students are expected to:

(A)  use ideas (e.g., illustrations, titles, topic sentences, key words, and foreshadowing clues) to make and confirm predictions;

(B)  ask relevant questions, seek clarification, and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text; and

(C)  establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e.g., identifying clues, using background knowledge, generating questions, re-reading a portion aloud).

(3)  Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to read aloud grade-level appropriate text with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.

(4)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify the meaning of common prefixes (e.g., in-, dis-) and suffixes (e.g., -full, -less), and know how they change the meaning of roots;

(B)  use context to determine the relevant meaning of unfamiliar words or distinguish among multiple meaning words and homographs;

(C)  identify and use antonyms, synonyms, homographs, and homophones;

(D)  identify and apply playful uses of language (e.g., tongue twisters, palindromes, riddles); and

(E)  alphabetize a series of words to the third letter and use a dictionary or a glossary to determine the meanings, syllabication, and pronunciation of unknown words.

(5)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories; and

(B)  compare and contrast the settings in myths and traditional folktales.

(6)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to describe the characteristics of various forms of poetry and how they create imagery (e.g., narrative poetry, lyrical poetry, humorous poetry, free verse).

(7)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the elements of plot and character as presented through dialogue in scripts that are read, viewed, written, or performed.

(8)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  sequence and summarize the plot's main events and explain their influence on future events;

(B)  describe the interaction of characters including their relationships and the changes they undergo; and

(C)  identify whether the narrator or speaker of a story is first or third person.

(9)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and respond by providing evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the difference in point of view between a biography and autobiography.

(10)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify language that creates a graphic visual experience and appeals to the senses.

(11)  Reading/Comprehension of Text/Independent Reading. Students read independently for sustained periods of time and produce evidence of their reading. Students are expected to read independently for a sustained period of time and paraphrase what the reading was about, maintaining meaning and logical order (e.g., generate a reading log or journal; participate in book talks).

(12)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the topic and locate the author's stated purposes in writing the text.

(13)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify the details or facts that support the main idea;

(B)  draw conclusions from the facts presented in text and support those assertions with textual evidence;

(C)  identify explicit cause and effect relationships among ideas in texts; and

(D)  use text features (e.g., bold print, captions, key words, italics) to locate information and make and verify predictions about contents of text.

(14)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students are expected to identify what the author is trying to persuade the reader to think or do.

(15)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow and explain a set of written multi-step directions; and

(B)  locate and use specific information in graphic features of text.

(16)  Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:

(A)  understand how communication changes when moving from one genre of media to another;

(B)  explain how various design techniques used in media influence the message (e.g., shape, color, sound); and

(C)  compare various written conventions used for digital media (e.g., language in an informal e-mail vs. language in a web-based news article).

(17)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience and generating ideas through a range of strategies (e.g., brainstorming, graphic organizers, logs, journals);

(B)  develop drafts by categorizing ideas and organizing them into paragraphs;

(C)  revise drafts for coherence, organization, use of simple and compound sentences, and audience;

(D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling using a teacher-developed rubric; and

(E)  publish written work for a specific audience.

(18)  Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:

(A)  write imaginative stories that build the plot to a climax and contain details about the characters and setting; and

(B)  write poems that convey sensory details using the conventions of poetry (e.g., rhyme, meter, patterns of verse).

(19)  Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write about important personal experiences.

(20)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

(A)  create brief compositions that:

(i)  establish a central idea in a topic sentence;

(ii)  include supporting sentences with simple facts, details, and explanations; and

(iii)  contain a concluding statement;

(B)  write letters whose language is tailored to the audience and purpose (e.g., a thank you note to a friend) and that use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing); and

(C)  write responses to literary or expository texts that demonstrate an understanding of the text.

(21)  Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write persuasive essays for appropriate audiences that establish a position and use supporting details.

(22)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:

(i)  verbs (past, present, and future);

(ii)  nouns (singular/plural, common/proper);

(iii)  adjectives (e.g., descriptive: wooden, rectangular; limiting: this, that; articles: a, an, the);

(iv)  adverbs (e.g., time: before, next; manner: carefully, beautifully);

(v)  prepositions and prepositional phrases;

(vi)  possessive pronouns (e.g., his, hers, theirs);

(vii)  coordinating conjunctions (e.g., and, or, but); and

(viii)  time-order transition words and transitions that indicate a conclusion;

(B)  use the complete subject and the complete predicate in a sentence; and

(C)  use complete simple and compound sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.

(23)  Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:

(A)  write legibly in cursive script with spacing between words in a sentence;

(B)  use capitalization for:

(i)  geographical names and places;

(ii)  historical periods; and

(iii)  official titles of people;

(C)  recognize and use punctuation marks including:

(i)  apostrophes in contractions and possessives; and

(ii)  commas in series and dates; and

(D)  use correct mechanics including paragraph indentations.

(24)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:

(A)  use knowledge of letter sounds, word parts, word segmentation, and syllabication to spell;

(B)  spell words with more advanced orthographic patterns and rules:

(i)  consonant doubling when adding an ending;

(ii)  dropping final "e" when endings are added (e.g., -ing, -ed);

(iii)  changing y to i before adding an ending;

(iv)  double consonants in middle of words;

(v)  complex consonants (e.g., scr-, -dge, -tch); and

(vi)  abstract vowels (e.g., ou as in could, touch, through, bought);

(C)  spell high-frequency and compound words from a commonly used list;

(D)  spell words with common syllable constructions (e.g., closed, open, final stable syllable);

(E)  spell single syllable homophones (e.g., bear/bare; week/weak; road/rode);

(F)  spell complex contractions (e.g., should've, won't); and

(G)  use print and electronic resources to find and check correct spellings.

(25)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:

(A)  generate research topics from personal interests or by brainstorming with others, narrow to one topic, and formulate open-ended questions about the major research topic; and

(B)  generate a research plan for gathering relevant information (e.g., surveys, interviews, encyclopedias) about the major research question.

(26)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow the research plan to collect information from multiple sources of information, both oral and written, including:

(i)  student-initiated surveys, on-site inspections, and interviews;

(ii)  data from experts, reference texts, and online searches; and

(iii)  visual sources of information (e.g., maps, timelines, graphs) where appropriate;

(B)  use skimming and scanning techniques to identify data by looking at text features (e.g., bold print, captions, key words, italics);

(C)  take simple notes and sort evidence into provided categories or an organizer;

(D)  identify the author, title, publisher, and publication year of sources; and

(E)  differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.

(27)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to improve the focus of research as a result of consulting expert sources (e.g., reference librarians and local experts on the topic).

(28)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to draw conclusions through a brief written explanation and create a works-cited page from notes, including the author, title, publisher, and publication year for each source used.

(29)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  listen attentively to speakers, ask relevant questions, and make pertinent comments; and

(B)  follow, restate, and give oral instructions that involve a series of related sequences of action.

(30)  Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to speak coherently about the topic under discussion, employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, and the conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.

(31)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate in teacher- and student-led discussions by posing and answering questions with appropriate detail and by providing suggestions that build upon the ideas of others.

Source: The provisions of this 110.14 adopted to be effective September 4, 2008, 33 TexReg 7162.


110.15. English Language Arts and Reading, Grade 4, Beginning with School Year 2009-2010.

(a)  Introduction.

(1)  The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The standards are cumulative--students will continue to address earlier standards as needed while they attend to standards for their grade. In fourth grade, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills. Students should read and write on a daily basis.

(2)  For students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition.

(A)  English language learners (ELLs) are acquiring English, learning content in English, and learning to read simultaneously. For this reason, it is imperative that reading instruction should be comprehensive and that students receive instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, and word attack skills while simultaneously being taught academic vocabulary and comprehension skills and strategies. Reading instruction that enhances ELL's ability to decode unfamiliar words and to make sense of those words in context will expedite their ability to make sense of what they read and learn from reading. Additionally, developing fluency, spelling, and grammatical conventions of academic language must be done in meaningful contexts and not in isolation.

(B)  For ELLs, comprehension of texts requires additional scaffolds to support comprehensible input. ELL students should use the knowledge of their first language (e.g., cognates) to further vocabulary development. Vocabulary needs to be taught in the context of connected discourse so that language is meaningful. ELLs must learn how rhetorical devices in English differ from those in their native language. At the same time English learners are learning in English, the focus is on academic English, concepts, and the language structures specific to the content.

(C)  During initial stages of English development, ELLs are expected to meet standards in a second language that many monolingual English speakers find difficult to meet in their native language. However, English language learners' abilities to meet these standards will be influenced by their proficiency in English. While English language learners can analyze, synthesize, and evaluate, their level of English proficiency may impede their ability to demonstrate this knowledge during the initial stages of English language acquisition. It is also critical to understand that ELLs with no previous or with interrupted schooling will require explicit and strategic support as they acquire English and learn to learn in English simultaneously.

(3)  To meet Public Education Goal 1 of the Texas Education Code, 4.002, which states, "The students in the public education system will demonstrate exemplary performance in the reading and writing of the English language," students will accomplish the essential knowledge, skills, and student expectations at Grade 4 as described in subsection (b) of this section.

(4)  To meet Texas Education Code, 28.002(h), which states, "... each school district shall foster the continuation of the tradition of teaching United States and Texas history and the free enterprise system in regular subject matter and in reading courses and in the adoption of textbooks," students will be provided oral and written narratives as well as other informational texts that can help them to become thoughtful, active citizens who appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation.

(b)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to read aloud grade-level stories with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.

(2)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:

(A)  determine the meaning of grade-level academic English words derived from Latin, Greek, or other linguistic roots and affixes;

(B)  use the context of the sentence (e.g., in-sentence example or definition) to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words or multiple meaning words;

(C)  complete analogies using knowledge of antonyms and synonyms (e.g., boy:girl as male:____ or girl:woman as boy:_____);

(D)  identify the meaning of common idioms; and

(E)  use a dictionary or glossary to determine the meanings, syllabication, and pronunciation of unknown words.

(3)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  summarize and explain the lesson or message of a work of fiction as its theme; and

(B)  compare and contrast the adventures or exploits of characters (e.g., the trickster) in traditional and classical literature.

(4)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain how the structural elements of poetry (e.g., rhyme, meter, stanzas, line breaks) relate to form (e.g., lyrical poetry, free verse).

(5)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to describe the structural elements particular to dramatic literature.

(6)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  sequence and summarize the plot's main events and explain their influence on future events;

(B)  describe the interaction of characters including their relationships and the changes they undergo; and

(C)  identify whether the narrator or speaker of a story is first or third person.

(7)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify similarities and differences between the events and characters' experiences in a fictional work and the actual events and experiences described in an author's biography or autobiography.

(8)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the author's use of similes and metaphors to produce imagery.

(9)  Reading/Comprehension of Text/Independent Reading. Students read independently for sustained periods of time and produce evidence of their reading. Students are expected to read independently for a sustained period of time and paraphrase what the reading was about, maintaining meaning and logical order (e.g., generate a reading log or journal; participate in book talks).

(10)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the difference between a stated and an implied purpose for an expository text.

(11)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  summarize the main idea and supporting details in text in ways that maintain meaning;

(B)  distinguish fact from opinion in a text and explain how to verify what is a fact;

(C)  describe explicit and implicit relationships among ideas in texts organized by cause-and-effect, sequence, or comparison; and

(D)  use multiple text features (e.g., guide words, topic and concluding sentences) to gain an overview of the contents of text and to locate information.

(12)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students are expected to explain how an author uses language to present information to influence what the reader thinks or does.

(13)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:

(A)  determine the sequence of activities needed to carry out a procedure (e.g., following a recipe); and

(B)  explain factual information presented graphically (e.g., charts, diagrams, graphs, illustrations).

(14)  Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:

(A)  explain the positive and negative impacts of advertisement techniques used in various genres of media to impact consumer behavior;

(B)  explain how various design techniques used in media influence the message (e.g., pacing, close-ups, sound effects); and

(C)  compare various written conventions used for digital media (e.g. language in an informal e-mail vs. language in a web-based news article).

(15)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience and generating ideas through a range of strategies (e.g., brainstorming, graphic organizers, logs, journals);

(B)  develop drafts by categorizing ideas and organizing them into paragraphs;

(C)  revise drafts for coherence, organization, use of simple and compound sentences, and audience;

(D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling using a teacher-developed rubric; and

(E)  revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for a specific audience.

(16)  Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:

(A)  write imaginative stories that build the plot to a climax and contain details about the characters and setting; and

(B)  write poems that convey sensory details using the conventions of poetry (e.g., rhyme, meter, patterns of verse).

(17)  Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write about important personal experiences.

(18)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

(A)  create brief compositions that:

(i)  establish a central idea in a topic sentence;

(ii)  include supporting sentences with simple facts, details, and explanations; and

(iii)  contain a concluding statement;

(B)  write letters whose language is tailored to the audience and purpose (e.g., a thank you note to a friend) and that use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing); and

(C)  write responses to literary or expository texts and provide evidence from the text to demonstrate understanding.

(19)  Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write persuasive essays for appropriate audiences that establish a position and use supporting details.

(20)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:

(i)  verbs (irregular verbs);

(ii)  nouns (singular/plural, common/proper);

(iii)  adjectives (e.g., descriptive, including purpose: sleeping bag, frying pan) and their comparative and superlative forms (e.g., fast, faster, fastest);

(iv)  adverbs (e.g., frequency: usually, sometimes; intensity: almost, a lot);

(v)  prepositions and prepositional phrases to convey location, time, direction, or to provide details;

(vi)  reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves);

(vii)  correlative conjunctions (e.g., either/or, neither/nor); and

(viii)  use time-order transition words and transitions that indicate a conclusion;

(B)  use the complete subject and the complete predicate in a sentence; and

(C)  use complete simple and compound sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.

(21)  Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:

(A)  write legibly by selecting cursive script or manuscript printing as appropriate;

(B)  use capitalization for:

(i)  historical events and documents;

(ii)  titles of books, stories, and essays; and

(iii)  languages, races, and nationalities; and

(C)  recognize and use punctuation marks including:

(i)  commas in compound sentences; and

(ii)  quotation marks.

(22)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:

(A)  spell words with more advanced orthographic patterns and rules:

(i)  plural rules (e.g., words ending in f as in leaf, leaves; adding -es);

(ii)  irregular plurals (e.g., man/men, foot/feet, child/children);

(iii)  double consonants in middle of words;

(iv)  other ways to spell sh (e.g., -sion, -tion, -cian); and

(v)  silent letters (e.g., knee, wring);

(B)  spell base words and roots with affixes (e.g., -ion, -ment, -ly, dis-, pre-);

(C)  spell commonly used homophones (e.g., there, they're, their; two, too, to); and

(D)  use spelling patterns and rules and print and electronic resources to determine and check correct spellings.

(23)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:

(A)  generate research topics from personal interests or by brainstorming with others, narrow to one topic, and formulate open-ended questions about the major research topic; and

(B)  generate a research plan for gathering relevant information (e.g., surveys, interviews, encyclopedias) about the major research question.

(24)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow the research plan to collect information from multiple sources of information both oral and written, including:

(i)  student-initiated surveys, on-site inspections, and interviews;

(ii)  data from experts, reference texts, and online searches; and

(iii)  visual sources of information (e.g., maps, timelines, graphs) where appropriate;

(B)  use skimming and scanning techniques to identify data by looking at text features (e.g., bold print, italics);

(C)  take simple notes and sort evidence into provided categories or an organizer;

(D)  identify the author, title, publisher, and publication year of sources; and

(E)  differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.

(25)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to improve the focus of research as a result of consulting expert sources (e.g., reference librarians and local experts on the topic).

(26)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to draw conclusions through a brief written explanation and create a works-cited page from notes, including the author, title, publisher, and publication year for each source used.

(27)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  listen attentively to speakers, ask relevant questions, and make pertinent comments; and

(B)  follow, restate, and give oral instructions that involve a series of related sequences of action.

(28)  Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to express an opinion supported by accurate information, employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, and enunciation, and the conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.

(29)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate in teacher- and student-led discussions by posing and answering questions with appropriate detail and by providing suggestions that build upon the ideas of others.

Source: The provisions of this 110.15 adopted to be effective September 4, 2008, 33 TexReg 7162.


110.16. English Language Arts and Reading, Grade 5, Beginning with School Year 2009-2010.

(a)  Introduction.

(1)  The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The standards are cumulative--students will continue to address earlier standards as needed while they attend to standards for their grade. In fifth grade, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills. Students should read and write on a daily basis.

(2)  For students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition.

(A)  English language learners (ELLs) are acquiring English, learning content in English, and learning to read simultaneously. For this reason, it is imperative that reading instruction should be comprehensive and that students receive instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, and word attack skills while simultaneously being taught academic vocabulary and comprehension skills and strategies. Reading instruction that enhances ELL's ability to decode unfamiliar words and to make sense of those words in context will expedite their ability to make sense of what they read and learn from reading. Additionally, developing fluency, spelling, and grammatical conventions of academic language must be done in meaningful contexts and not in isolation.

(B)  For ELLs, comprehension of texts requires additional scaffolds to support comprehensible input. ELL students should use the knowledge of their first language (e.g., cognates) to further vocabulary development. Vocabulary needs to be taught in the context of connected discourse so that language is meaningful. ELLs must learn how rhetorical devices in English differ from those in their native language. At the same time English learners are learning in English, the focus is on academic English, concepts, and the language structures specific to the content.

(C)  During initial stages of English development, ELLs are expected to meet standards in a second language that many monolingual English speakers find difficult to meet in their native language. However, English language learners' abilities to meet these standards will be influenced by their proficiency in English. While English language learners can analyze, synthesize, and evaluate, their level of English proficiency may impede their ability to demonstrate this knowledge during the initial stages of English language acquisition. It is also critical to understand that ELLs with no previous or with interrupted schooling will require explicit and strategic support as they acquire English and learn to learn in English simultaneously.

(3)  To meet Public Education Goal 1 of the Texas Education Code, 4.002, which states, "The students in the public education system will demonstrate exemplary performance in the reading and writing of the English language," students will accomplish the essential knowledge, skills, and student expectations at Grade 5 as described in subsection (b) of this section.

(4)  To meet Texas Education Code, 28.002(h), which states, "... each school district shall foster the continuation of the tradition of teaching United States and Texas history and the free enterprise system in regular subject matter and in reading courses and in the adoption of textbooks," students will be provided oral and written narratives as well as other informational texts that can help them to become thoughtful, active citizens who appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation.

(b)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to read aloud grade-level stories with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.

(2)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:

(A)  determine the meaning of grade-level academic English words derived from Latin, Greek, or other linguistic roots and affixes;

(B)  use context (e.g., in-sentence restatement) to determine or clarify the meaning of unfamiliar or multiple meaning words;

(C)  produce analogies with known antonyms and synonyms;

(D)  identify and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and other sayings; and

(E)  use a dictionary, a glossary, or a thesaurus (printed or electronic) to determine the meanings, syllabication, pronunciations, alternate word choices, and parts of speech of words.

(3)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast the themes or moral lessons of several works of fiction from various cultures;

(B)  describe the phenomena explained in origin myths from various cultures; and

(C)  explain the effect of a historical event or movement on the theme of a work of literature.

(4)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze how poets use sound effects (e.g., alliteration, internal rhyme, onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme) to reinforce meaning in poems.

(5)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze the similarities and differences between an original text and its dramatic adaptation.

(6)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  describe incidents that advance the story or novel, explaining how each incident gives rise to or foreshadows future events;

(B)  explain the roles and functions of characters in various plots, including their relationships and conflicts; and

(C)  explain different forms of third-person points of view in stories.

(7)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the literary language and devices used in biographies and autobiographies, including how authors present major events in a person's life.

(8)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to evaluate the impact of sensory details, imagery, and figurative language in literary text.

(9)  Reading/Comprehension of Text/Independent Reading. Students read independently for sustained periods of time and produce evidence of their reading. Students are expected to read independently for a sustained period of time and summarize or paraphrase what the reading was about, maintaining meaning and logical order (e.g., generate a reading log or journal; participate in book talks).

(10)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to draw conclusions from the information presented by an author and evaluate how well the author's purpose was achieved.

(11)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  summarize the main ideas and supporting details in a text in ways that maintain meaning and logical order;

(B)  determine the facts in text and verify them through established methods;

(C)  analyze how the organizational pattern of a text (e.g., cause-and-effect, compare-and-contrast, sequential order, logical order, classification schemes) influences the relationships among the ideas;

(D)  use multiple text features and graphics to gain an overview of the contents of text and to locate information; and

(E)  synthesize and make logical connections between ideas within a text and across two or three texts representing similar or different genres.

(12)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify the author's viewpoint or position and explain the basic relationships among ideas (e.g., parallelism, comparison, causality) in the argument; and

(B)  recognize exaggerated, contradictory, or misleading statements in text.

(13)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:

(A)  interpret details from procedural text to complete a task, solve a problem, or perform procedures; and

(B)  interpret factual or quantitative information presented in maps, charts, illustrations, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.

(14)  Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:

(A)  explain how messages conveyed in various forms of media are presented differently (e.g., documentaries, online information, televised news);

(B)  consider the difference in techniques used in media (e.g., commercials, documentaries, news);

(C)  identify the point of view of media presentations; and

(D)  analyze various digital media venues for levels of formality and informality.

(15)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;

(B)  develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;

(C)  revise drafts to clarify meaning, enhance style, include simple and compound sentences, and improve transitions by adding, deleting, combining, and rearranging sentences or larger units of text after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;

(D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and

(E)  revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

(16)  Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:

(A)  write imaginative stories that include:

(i)  a clearly defined focus, plot, and point of view;

(ii)  a specific, believable setting created through the use of sensory details; and

(iii)  dialogue that develops the story; and

(B)  write poems using:

(i)  poetic techniques (e.g., alliteration, onomatopoeia);

(ii)  figurative language (e.g., similes, metaphors); and

(iii)  graphic elements (e.g., capital letters, line length).

(17)  Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write a personal narrative that conveys thoughts and feelings about an experience.

(18)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

(A)  create multi-paragraph essays to convey information about the topic that:

(i)  present effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;

(ii)  guide and inform the reader's understanding of key ideas and evidence;

(iii)  include specific facts, details, and examples in an appropriately organized structure; and

(iv)  use a variety of sentence structures and transitions to link paragraphs;

(B)  write formal and informal letters that convey ideas, include important information, demonstrate a sense of closure, and use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing); and

(C)  write responses to literary or expository texts and provide evidence from the text to demonstrate understanding.

(19)  Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write persuasive essays for appropriate audiences that establish a position and include sound reasoning, detailed and relevant evidence, and consideration of alternatives.

(20)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:

(i)  verbs (irregular verbs and active voice);

(ii)  collective nouns (e.g., class, public);

(iii)  adjectives (e.g., descriptive, including origins: French windows, American cars) and their comparative and superlative forms (e.g., good, better, best);

(iv)  adverbs (e.g., frequency: usually, sometimes; intensity: almost, a lot);

(v)  prepositions and prepositional phrases to convey location, time, direction, or to provide details;

(vi)  indefinite pronouns (e.g., all, both, nothing, anything);

(vii)  subordinating conjunctions (e.g., while, because, although, if); and

(viii)  transitional words (e.g., also, therefore);

(B)  use the complete subject and the complete predicate in a sentence; and

(C)  use complete simple and compound sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.

(21)  Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:

(A)  use capitalization for:

(i)  abbreviations;

(ii)  initials and acronyms; and

(iii)  organizations;

(B)  recognize and use punctuation marks including:

(i)  commas in compound sentences; and

(ii)  proper punctuation and spacing for quotations; and

(C)  use proper mechanics including italics and underlining for titles and emphasis.

(22)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:

(A)  spell words with more advanced orthographic patterns and rules:

(i)  consonant changes (e.g.,/t/ to/sh/ in select, selection;/k/ to/sh/ in music, musician);

(ii)  vowel changes (e.g., long to short in crime, criminal; long to schwa in define, definition; short to schwa in legality, legal); and

(iii)  silent and sounded consonants (e.g., haste, hasten; sign, signal; condemn, condemnation);

(B)  spell words with:

(i)  Greek Roots (e.g., tele, photo, graph, meter);

(ii)  Latin Roots (e.g., spec, scrib, rupt, port, ject, dict);

(iii)  Greek suffixes (e.g., -ology, -phobia, -ism, -ist); and

(iv)  Latin derived suffixes (e.g., -able, -ible; -ance, -ence);

(C)  differentiate between commonly confused terms (e.g., its, it's; affect, effect);

(D)  use spelling patterns and rules and print and electronic resources to determine and check correct spellings; and

(E)  know how to use the spell-check function in word processing while understanding its limitations.

(23)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:

(A)  brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate open-ended questions to address the major research topic; and

(B)  generate a research plan for gathering relevant information about the major research question.

(24)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow the research plan to collect data from a range of print and electronic resources (e.g., reference texts, periodicals, web pages, online sources) and data from experts;

(B)  differentiate between primary and secondary sources;

(C)  record data, utilizing available technology (e.g., word processors) in order to see the relationships between ideas, and convert graphic/visual data (e.g., charts, diagrams, timelines) into written notes;

(D)  identify the source of notes (e.g., author, title, page number) and record bibliographic information concerning those sources according to a standard format; and

(E)  differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.

(25)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to:

(A)  refine the major research question, if necessary, guided by the answers to a secondary set of questions; and

(B)  evaluate the relevance, validity, and reliability of sources for the research.

(26)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that:

(A)  compiles important information from multiple sources;

(B)  develops a topic sentence, summarizes findings, and uses evidence to support conclusions;

(C)  presents the findings in a consistent format; and

(D)  uses quotations to support ideas and an appropriate form of documentation to acknowledge sources (e.g., bibliography, works cited).

(27)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  listen to and interpret a speaker's messages (both verbal and nonverbal) and ask questions to clarify the speaker's purpose or perspective;

(B)  follow, restate, and give oral instructions that include multiple action steps; and

(C)  determine both main and supporting ideas in the speaker's message.

(28)  Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to give organized presentations employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, natural gestures, and conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.

(29)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate in student-led discussions by eliciting and considering suggestions from other group members and by identifying points of agreement and disagreement.

Source: The provisions of this 110.16 adopted to be effective September 4, 2008, 33 TexReg 7162.


Last updated: February 23, 2010

For additional information, email rules@tea.state.tx.us.