Chapter 114. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Languages Other Than English
Subchapter C. High School


Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter C issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.


114.21. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Languages Other Than English, High School.

The provisions of this subchapter shall supersede 75.62(a)-(g) and (k)-(o) of this title (relating to Other Languages) beginning September 1, 1998.

Source: The provisions of this 114.21 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4930.


114.22. Levels I and II - Novice Progress Checkpoint (One Credit Per Level).

(a) General requirements.

(1) Levels I and II - Novice progress checkpoint can be offered in elementary, middle, or high school. At the high school level, students are awarded one unit of credit per level for successful completion of the level.

(2) Using age-appropriate activities, students develop the ability to perform the tasks of the novice language learner. The novice language learner, when dealing with familiar topics, should:

(A) understand short utterances when listening and respond orally with learned material;

(B) produce learned words, phrases, and sentences when speaking and writing;

(C) detect main ideas in familiar material when listening and reading;

(D) make lists, copy accurately, and write from dictation;

(E) recognize the importance in communication to know about the culture; and

(F) recognize the importance of acquiring accuracy of expression by knowing the components of language, including grammar.

(3) Students of classical languages use the skills of listening, speaking, and writing to reinforce the skill of reading.

(b) Introduction.

(1) Acquiring another language incorporates communication skills such as listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing. Students develop these communication skills by using knowledge of the language, including grammar, and culture, communication and learning strategies, technology, and content from other subject areas to socialize, to acquire and provide information, to express feelings and opinions, and to get others to adopt a course of action. While knowledge of other cultures, connections to other disciplines, comparisons between languages and cultures, and community interaction all contribute to and enhance the communicative language learning experience, communication skills are the primary focus of language acquisition.

(2) Students of languages other than English gain the knowledge to understand cultural practices (what people do) and products (what people create) and to increase their understanding of other cultures as well as to interact with members of those cultures. Through the learning of languages other than English, students obtain the tools and develop the context needed to connect with other subject areas and to use the language to acquire information and reinforce other areas of study. Students of languages other than English develop an understanding of the nature of language, including grammar, and culture and use this knowledge to compare languages and cultures and to expand insight into their own language and culture. Students enhance their personal and public lives and meet the career demands of the 21st century by using languages other than English to participate in communities in Texas, in other states, and around the world.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Communication. The student communicates in a language other than English using the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The student is expected to:

(A) engage in oral and written exchanges of learned material to socialize and to provide and obtain information;

(B) demonstrate understanding of simple, clearly spoken, and written language such as simple stories, high-frequency commands, and brief instructions when dealing with familiar topics; and

(C) present information using familiar words, phrases, and sentences to listeners and readers.

(2) Cultures. The student gains knowledge and understanding of other cultures. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate an understanding of the practices (what people do) and how they are related to the perspectives (how people perceive things) of the cultures studied; and

(B) demonstrate an understanding of the products (what people create) and how they are related to the perspectives (how people perceive things) of the cultures studied.

(3) Connections. The student uses the language to make connections with other subject areas and to acquire information. The student is expected to:

(A) use resources (that may include technology) in the language and cultures being studied to gain access to information; and

(B) use the language to obtain, reinforce, or expand knowledge of other subject areas.

(4) Comparisons. The student develops insight into the nature of language and culture by comparing the student's own language and culture to another. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the student's own language and the language studied;

(B) demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the student's own culture and the cultures studied; and

(C) demonstrate an understanding of the influence of one language and culture on another.

(5) Communities. The student participates in communities at home and around the world by using languages other than English. The student is expected to:

(A) use the language both within and beyond the school setting through activities such as participating in cultural events and using technology to communicate; and

(B) show evidence of becoming a lifelong learner by using the language for personal enrichment and career development.

Source: The provisions of this 114.22 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4930.


114.23. Levels III and IV - Intermediate Progress Checkpoint (One Credit Per Level).

(a) General requirements.

(1) Levels III and IV - Intermediate progress checkpoint can be offered in middle or high school. At the high school level, students are awarded one unit of credit per level for successful completion of the level.

(2) Using age-appropriate activities, students expand their ability to perform novice tasks and develop their ability to perform the tasks of the intermediate language learner. The intermediate language learner, when dealing with everyday topics, should:

(A) participate in simple face-to-face communication;

(B) create statements and questions to communicate independently when speaking and writing;

(C) understand main ideas and some details of material on familiar topics when listening and reading;

(D) understand simple statements and questions when listening and reading;

(E) meet limited practical and social writing needs;

(F) use knowledge of the culture in the development of communication skills;

(G) use knowledge of the components of language, including grammar, to increase accuracy of expression; and

(H) cope successfully in straightforward social and survival situations.

(3) In classical languages, the skills of listening, speaking, and writing are used in Level III to reinforce the skill of reading. Students of classical languages should reach intermediate proficiency in reading by the end of Level III.

(b) Introduction.

(1) Acquiring another language incorporates communication skills such as listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing. Students develop these communication skills by using knowledge of the language, including grammar, and culture, communication and learning strategies, technology, and content from other subject areas to socialize, to acquire and provide information, to express feelings and opinions, and to get others to adopt a course of action. While knowledge of other cultures, connections to other disciplines, comparisons between languages and cultures, and community interaction all contribute to and enhance the communicative language learning experience, communication skills are the primary focus of language acquisition.

(2) Students of languages other than English gain the knowledge to understand cultural practices (what people do) and products (what people create) and to increase their understanding of other cultures as well as to interact with members of those cultures. Through the learning of languages other than English, students obtain the tools and develop the context needed to connect with other subject areas and to use the language to acquire information and reinforce other areas of study. Students of languages other than English develop an understanding of the nature of language, including grammar, and culture and use this knowledge to compare languages and cultures and to expand insight into their own language and culture. Students enhance their personal and public lives and meet the career demands of the 21st century by using languages other than English to participate in communities in Texas, in other states, and around the world.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Communication. The student communicates in a language other than English using the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The student is expected to:

(A) engage in oral and written exchanges to socialize, to provide and obtain information, to express preferences and feelings, and to satisfy basic needs;

(B) interpret and demonstrate understanding of simple, straightforward, spoken and written language such as instructions, directions, announcements, reports, conversations, brief descriptions, and narrations; and

(C) present information and convey short messages on everyday topics to listeners and readers.

(2) Cultures. The student gains knowledge and understanding of other cultures. The student is expected to:

(A) use the language at the intermediate proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the practices (what people do) and how they are related to the perspectives (how people perceive things) of the cultures studied; and

(B) use the language at the intermediate proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the products (what people create) and how they are related to the perspectives (how people perceive things) of the cultures studied.

(3) Connections. The student uses the language to make connections with other subject areas and to acquire information. The student is expected to:

(A) use resources (that may include technology) in the language and cultures being studied at the intermediate proficiency level to gain access to information; and

(B) use the language at the intermediate proficiency level to obtain, reinforce, or expand knowledge of other subject areas.

(4) Comparisons. The student develops insight into the nature of language and culture by comparing the student's own language and culture to another. The student is expected to:

(A) use the language at the intermediate proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the student's own language and the language studied;

(B) use the language at the intermediate proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the student's own culture and the cultures studied; and

(C) use the language at the intermediate proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the influence of one language and culture on another.

(5) Communities. The student participates in communities at home and around the world by using languages other than English. The student is expected to:

(A) use the language at the intermediate proficiency level both within and beyond the school setting through activities such as participating in cultural events and using technology to communicate; and

(B) show evidence of becoming a lifelong learner by using the language at the intermediate proficiency level for personal enrichment and career development.

Source: The provisions of this 114.23 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4930.


114.24. Levels V, VI and VII - Advanced Progress Checkpoint (One Credit Per Level).

(a) General requirements.

(1) Levels V, VI, and VII - Advanced progress checkpoint can be offered in high school. At the high school level, students are awarded one unit of credit per level for successful completion of the level.

(2) Using age-appropriate activities, students master novice tasks, expand their ability to perform intermediate tasks, and develop their ability to perform the tasks of the advanced language learner. The advanced language learner of modern languages, when dealing with events of the concrete world, should:

(A) participate fully in casual conversations in culturally appropriate ways;

(B) explain, narrate, and describe in past, present, and future time when speaking and writing;

(C) understand main ideas and most details of material on a variety of topics when listening and reading;

(D) write coherent paragraphs;

(E) cope successfully in problematic social and survival situations;

(F) achieve an acceptable level of accuracy of expression by using knowledge of language components, including grammar; and

(G) apply knowledge of culture when communicating.

(3) The advanced language learner of classical languages reads and comprehends authentic texts of prose and poetry of selected authors. The skills of listening, speaking, and writing are used to reinforce the skill of reading.

(4) Students of classical languages may reach advanced proficiency in reading during Level IV. (A student who completes a College Board Advanced Placement course or the International Baccalaureate in Latin should reach advanced proficiency in reading during Level IV.)

(b) Introduction.

(1) Acquiring another language incorporates communication skills such as listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing. Students develop these communication skills by using knowledge of the language, including grammar, and culture, communication and learning strategies, technology, and content from other subject areas to socialize, to acquire and provide information, to express feelings and opinions, and to get others to adopt a course of action. While knowledge of other cultures, connections to other disciplines, comparisons between languages and cultures, and community interaction all contribute to and enhance the communicative language learning experience, communication skills are the primary focus of language acquisition.

(2) Students of languages other than English gain the knowledge to understand cultural practices (what people do) and products (what people create) and to increase their understanding of other cultures as well as to interact with members of those cultures. Through the learning of languages other than English, students obtain the tools and develop the context needed to connect with other subject areas and to use the language to acquire information and reinforce other areas of study. Students of languages other than English develop an understanding of the nature of language, including grammar, and culture and use this knowledge to compare languages and cultures and to expand insight into their own language and culture. Students enhance their personal and public lives and meet the career demands of the 21st century by using languages other than English to participate in communities in Texas, in other states, and around the world.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Communication. The student communicates in a language other than English using the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The student is expected to:

(A) engage in oral and written exchanges, including providing and obtaining information, expressing feelings and preferences, and exchanging ideas and opinions;

(B) interpret and demonstrate understanding of spoken and written language, including literature, on a variety of topics; and

(C) present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics to listeners and readers.

(2) Cultures. The student gains knowledge and understanding of other cultures. The student is expected to:

(A) use the language at the advanced proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the practices (what people do) and how they are related to the perspectives (how people perceive things) of the cultures studied; and

(B) use the language at the advanced proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the products (what people create) and how they are related to the perspectives (how people perceive things) of the cultures studied.

(3) Connections. The student uses the language to make connections with other subject areas and to acquire information. The student is expected to:

(A) use resources (that may include technology) in the language and cultures being studied at the advanced proficiency level to gain access to information; and

(B) use the language at the advanced proficiency level to obtain, reinforce, or expand knowledge of other subject areas.

(4) Comparisons. The student develops insight into the nature of language and culture by comparing the student's own language and culture to another. The student is expected to:

(A) use the language at the advanced proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the student's own language and the language studied;

(B) use the language at the advanced proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the student's own culture and the cultures studied; and

(C) use the language at the advanced proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the influence of one language and culture on another.

(5) Communities. The student participates in communities at home and around the world by using languages other than English. The student is expected to:

(A) use the language at the advanced proficiency level both within and beyond the school setting through activities such as participating in cultural events and using technology to communicate; and

(B) show evidence of becoming a lifelong learner by using the language at the advanced proficiency level for personal enrichment and career development.

Source: The provisions of this 114.24 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4930.


114.25. Exploratory Languages (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements.

(1) Exploratory languages is a nonsequential course that can be offered in elementary, middle, or high school. At the high school level, students are awarded one-half to one unit of credit for successful completion of a course.

(2) Using age-appropriate activities, students study selected aspects of one or more languages and cultures and/or develop basic language learning and communicative skills.

(b) Introduction. Exploratory courses in languages other than English introduce the student to the study of other languages. Students use components of language, make observations about languages and cultures, develop language study skills, and/or acquire simple communicative skills by completing one or more of the knowledge and skills for exploratory languages.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student uses components of language. The student is expected to:

(A) participate in different types of language learning activities;

(B) use the language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and/or writing;

(C) demonstrate an awareness of some aspects of culture in using the language; and

(D) demonstrate an awareness of the subsystems of other languages (such as grammar, vocabulary, and phonology).

(2) The student makes observations about languages and cultures. The student is expected to:

(A) compare and contrast features of other languages to English;

(B) recognize the role of nonlinguistic elements (such as gestures) in communication;

(C) demonstrate an understanding of the fact that human behavior is influenced by culture; and

(D) compare some aspects of other cultures to the student's own culture.

(3) The student develops language study skills. The student is expected to:

(A) practice different language learning strategies;

(B) demonstrate an understanding of the fact that making and correcting errors is an important part of learning a language; and

(C) demonstrate an awareness of language patterns.

Source: The provisions of this 114.25 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4930.


114.26. Cultural and Linguistic Topics (One-Half to One Credit).

(a) General requirements.

(1) Cultural and linguistic topics is a nonsequential course that can be offered in elementary, middle, or high school. At the high school level, students are awarded one-half to one unit of credit for successful completion of a course. Upon completion of the course, students may choose to receive credit for a nonsequential course in languages other than English or credit for a social studies elective course.

(2) Using age-appropriate activities, students study cultural, linguistic, geographical, or historical aspects of selected regions or countries.

(b) Introduction. Courses in cultural and linguistic topics introduce students to the study of other cultures. Students gain the knowledge to understand the historical development, geographical aspects, cultural aspects, and/or linguistic aspects of selected regions or countries by completing one or more of the knowledge and skills for cultural and linguistic topics.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student gains knowledge of the cultural aspects of selected regions or countries. The student is expected to:

(A) identify social, cultural, and economic changes that have affected customs and conventions in a region or country;

(B) explain variations of cultural patterns within a region or country;

(C) demonstrate an understanding of the role of traditions in influencing a culture's practices (what people do) and products (what people create); and

(D) recognize the art, music, literature, drama, or other culturally related activity of a region or country.

(2) The student gains a knowledge of certain linguistic aspects of selected regions, countries, or languages. The student is expected to:

(A) reproduce, read, write, or demonstrate an understanding of common expressions and vocabulary used in the region, country, or language studied;

(B) describe general aspects of a language based upon the linguistic experiences provided, such as word etymologies and derivatives; and

(C) recognize the linguistic contributions of native speakers and writers from various regions.

(3) The student gains knowledge of the geographical aspects of and their related influences on selected regions or countries. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate an understanding of the influence of geography on the historical development of a region or country; and

(B) provide examples of the interrelationships between the physical and cultural environments.

(4) The student gains knowledge of the historical aspects of selected regions or countries. The student is expected to:

(A) recognize examples of the interactions of a region or country with the rest of the world;

(B) trace historical events from their inception to the present; and

(C) identify significant personalities in the development of a region or country.

Source: The provisions of this 114.26 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4930.


114.27. American Sign Language Levels I and II - Novice Progress Checkpoint (One Credit Per Level).

(a) General requirements.

(1) Levels I and II - Novice progress checkpoint can be offered in elementary, middle, or high school. At the high school level, students are awarded one unit of credit per level for successful completion of the level.

(2) Using age-appropriate activities, students develop the ability to perform the tasks of the novice language learner. The novice language learner, when dealing with familiar topics, should:

(A) understand short-signed phrases when attending and respond expressively with learned material;

(B) produce learned signs, phrases, and sentences;

(C) detect main ideas in familiar material that is signed;

(D) be able to transcribe American Sign Language (ASL) into English gloss;

(E) recognize the importance of communication and how it relates to the American Deaf culture; and

(F) recognize the importance of acquiring accuracy of expression by knowing the components of ASL, including grammar.

(3) Students of ASL use expressive and receptive skills to reinforce comprehension.

(b) Introduction.

(1) Acquiring ASL incorporates expressive and receptive communication skills. Students develop these communication skills by using knowledge of the language, including grammar, and culture, communication and learning strategies, technology, and content from other subject areas to socialize, to acquire and provide information, to express feelings and opinions, and to get others to adopt a course of action. While knowledge of other cultures, connections to other disciplines, comparisons between languages and cultures, and community interaction all contribute to and enhance the communicative language learning experience, communication skills are the primary focus of language acquisition.

(2) Students of ASL gain the knowledge to understand cultural practices (what people do) and products (what people create) and to increase their understanding of other cultures as well as to interact with members of those cultures. Through the learning of ASL, students obtain the tools and develop the context needed to connect with other subject areas and to use the language to acquire information and reinforce other areas of study. Students of ASL develop an understanding of the nature of language, including grammar, and culture and use this knowledge to compare languages and cultures and to expand insight into their own language and culture. Students enhance their personal and public lives and meet the career demands of the 21st century by using ASL to participate in Deaf communities in Texas, in other states, and around the world.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Communication. The student communicates in ASL using expressive and receptive communication skills. The student is expected to:

(A) engage in a variety of signed exchanges of learned material to socialize and to provide and obtain information;

(B) demonstrate understanding of simple, clearly signed language such as simple stories, high-frequency commands, and brief instructions when dealing with familiar topics;

(C) present information using familiar words, phrases, and sentences to others; and

(D) demonstrate an awareness of ASL grammar, vocabulary, and phonology/cherology.

(2) Cultures. The student gains knowledge and understanding of other cultures. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate an understanding of the practices (what people do) and how they are related to the perspectives (how people perceive things) of the cultures studied; and

(B) demonstrate an understanding of the products (what people create) and how they are related to the perspectives (how people perceive things) of the cultures studied.

(3) Connections. The student uses the language to make connections with other subject areas and to acquire information. The student is expected to:

(A) use resources (that may include technology) in the language and cultures being studied to gain access to information; and

(B) use the language to obtain, reinforce, or expand knowledge of other subject areas.

(4) Comparisons. The student develops insight into the nature of language and culture by comparing the student's own language and culture to another. The student is expected to:

(A) demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the student's own language and ASL;

(B) demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the student's own culture and the American Deaf culture; and

(C) demonstrate an understanding of the influence of one language and culture on another.

(5) Communities. The student participates in communities at home and around the world by using languages other than English. The student is expected to:

(A) use the language both within and beyond the school setting through activities such as participating in cultural events and using technology to communicate; and

(B) show evidence of becoming a lifelong learner by using the language for personal enrichment and career development.

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this 114.27 issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.001 and 28.002.

Source: The provisions of this 114.27 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5965.


114.28. American Sign Language Levels III and IV - Intermediate Progress Checkpoint (One Credit Per Level).

(a) General requirements.

(1) Levels III and IV - Intermediate progress checkpoint can be offered in middle or high school. At the high school level, students are awarded one unit of credit per level for successful completion of the level.

(2) Using age-appropriate activities, students expand their ability to perform novice tasks and develop their ability to perform the tasks of the intermediate language learner. The intermediate language learner, when dealing with everyday topics, should:

(A) participate in simple face-to-face communication;

(B) create statements and questions to communicate independently when signing;

(C) understand main ideas and some details of signed material on familiar topics;

(D) understand simple signed statements and questions and transcribe these into written English gloss;

(E) meet limited practical and social communication needs;

(F) use knowledge of the culture in the development of communication skills;

(G) use knowledge of the components of American Sign Language (ASL), including grammar, to increase accuracy of expression; and

(H) cope successfully in straightforward social and survival situations.

(b) Introduction.

(1) Acquiring American Sign Language incorporates both expressive and receptive communication skills. Students develop these communication skills by using knowledge of the language, including grammar, and culture, communication and learning strategies, technology, and content from other subject areas to socialize, to acquire and provide information, to express feelings and opinions, and to get others to adopt a course of action. While knowledge of other cultures, connections to other disciplines, comparisons between languages and cultures, and community interaction all contribute to and enhance the communicative language learning experience, communication skills are the primary focus of language acquisition.

(2) Students of ASL gain the knowledge to understand cultural practices (what people do) and products (what people create) and to increase their understanding of other cultures as well as to interact with members of those cultures. Through the learning of ASL, students obtain the tools and develop the context needed to connect with other subject areas and to use the language to acquire information and reinforce other areas of study. Students of ASL develop an understanding of the nature of language, including grammar, and culture and use this knowledge to compare languages and cultures and to expand insight into their own language and culture. Students enhance their personal and public lives and meet the career demands of the 21st century by using ASL to participate in Deaf communities in Texas, in other states, and around the world.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Communication. The student communicates in ASL using expressive and receptive communication skills. The student is expected to:

(A) engage in a variety of signed exchanges to socialize, to provide and obtain information, to express preferences and feelings, and to satisfy basic needs;

(B) interpret and demonstrate understanding of simple, straightforward, signed language such as instructions, directions, announcements, reports, conversations, brief descriptions, and narrations;

(C) present information and convey short messages on everyday topics to others; and

(D) demonstrate an awareness of ASL grammar, vocabulary, and phonology/cherology.

(2) Cultures. The student gains knowledge and understanding of other cultures. The student is expected to:

(A) use the language at the intermediate proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the practices (what people do) and how they are related to the perspectives (how people perceive things) of the cultures studied; and

(B) use the language at the intermediate proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the products (what people create) and how they are related to the perspectives (how people perceive things) of the cultures studied.

(3) Connections. The student uses the language to make connections with other subject areas and to acquire information. The student is expected to:

(A) use resources (that may include technology) in the language and cultures being studied at the intermediate proficiency level to gain access to information; and

(B) use the language at the intermediate proficiency level to obtain, reinforce, or expand knowledge of other subject areas.

(4) Comparisons. The student develops insight into the nature of language and culture by comparing the student's own language and culture to another. The student is expected to:

(A) use the language at the intermediate proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the student's own language and ASL;

(B) use the language at the intermediate proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the student's own culture and the American Deaf culture; and

(C) use the language at the intermediate proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the influence of one language and culture on another.

(5) Communities. The student participates in communities at home and around the world by using languages other than English. The student is expected to:

(A) use the language at the intermediate proficiency level both within and beyond the school setting through activities such as participating in cultural events and using technology to communicate; and

(B) show evidence of becoming a lifelong learner by using the language at the intermediate proficiency level for personal enrichment and career development.

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this 114.28 issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.001 and 28.002.

Source: The provisions of this 114.28 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5965.


114.29. American Sign Language Levels V, VI and VII - Advanced Progress Checkpoint (One Credit Per Level).

(a) General requirements.

(1) Levels V, VI, and VII - Advanced progress checkpoint can be offered in high school. At the high school level, students are awarded one unit of credit per level for successful completion of the level.

(2) Using age-appropriate activities, students master novice tasks, expand their ability to perform intermediate tasks, and develop their ability to perform the tasks of the advanced language learner. The advanced language learner of modern languages, when dealing with events of the concrete world, should:

(A) participate fully in casual conversations in culturally appropriate ways;

(B) use American Sign Language (ASL) to explain, narrate, and describe in past, present, and future time;

(C) understand main ideas and most details of material that is signed on a variety of topics;

(D) transcribe ASL into written English gloss;

(E) cope successfully in problematic social and survival situations;

(F) achieve an acceptable level of accuracy of expression by using knowledge of ASL components, including grammar; and

(G) apply knowledge of culture when communicating.

(b) Introduction.

(1) Acquiring American Sign Language incorporates communication skills such as signing, attending, viewing, and showing. Students develop these communication skills by using knowledge of the language, including grammar, and culture, communication and learning strategies, technology, and content from other subject areas to socialize, to acquire and provide information, to express feelings and opinions, and to get others to adopt a course of action. While knowledge of other cultures, connections to other disciplines, comparisons between languages and cultures, and community interaction all contribute to and enhance the communicative language learning experience, communication skills are the primary focus of language acquisition.

(2) Students of ASL gain the knowledge to understand cultural practices (what people do) and products (what people create) and to increase their understanding of other cultures as well as to interact with members of those cultures. Through the learning of ASL, students obtain the tools and develop the context needed to connect with other subject areas and to use the language to acquire information and reinforce other areas of study. Students of ASL develop an understanding of the nature of language, including grammar, and culture and use this knowledge to compare languages and cultures and to expand insight into their own language and culture. Students enhance their personal and public lives and meet the career demands of the 21st century by using ASL to participate in Deaf communities in Texas, in other states, and around the world.

(c) Knowledge and skills.

(1) Communication. The student communicates in ASL using expressive and receptive communication skills. The student is expected to:

(A) engage in a variety of signed exchanges, including providing and obtaining information, expressing feelings and preferences, and exchanging ideas and opinions;

(B) interpret and demonstrate understanding of ASL on a variety of topics;

(C) present information, concepts, and ideas on a variety of topics to others; and

(D) use ASL at the advanced proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of its subsystem (such as grammar, vocabulary, and phonology/cherology).

(2) Cultures. The student gains knowledge and understanding of other cultures. The student is expected to:

(A) use the language at the advanced proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the practices (what people do) and how they are related to the perspectives (how people perceive things) of the cultures studied; and

(B) use the language at the advanced proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the products (what people create) and how they are related to the perspectives (how people perceive things) of the cultures studied.

(3) Connections. The student uses the language to make connections with other subject areas and to acquire information. The student is expected to:

(A) use resources (that may include technology) in the language and cultures being studied at the advanced proficiency level to gain access to information; and

(B) use the language at the advanced proficiency level to obtain, reinforce, or expand knowledge of other subject areas.

(4) Comparisons. The student develops insight into the nature of language and culture by comparing the student's own language and culture to another. The student is expected to:

(A) use the language at the advanced proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the student's own language and ASL;

(B) use the language at the advanced proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the student's own culture and the American Deaf culture; and

(C) use the language at the advanced proficiency level to demonstrate an understanding of the influence of one language and culture on another.

(5) Communities. The student participates in communities at home and around the world by using languages other than English. The student is expected to:

(A) use the language at the advanced proficiency level both within and beyond the school setting through activities such as participating in cultural events and using technology to communicate; and

(B) show evidence of becoming a lifelong learner by using the language at the advanced proficiency level for personal enrichment and career development.

Statutory Authority: The provisions of this 114.29 issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.001 and 28.002.

Source: The provisions of this 114.29 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5965.


For additional information, email rules@tea.state.tx.us.