Chapter 116. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Physical Education
Subchapter C. High School


Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter C issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.


116.51. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Physical Education, High School.

The provisions of this subchapter shall supersede 75.66 of this title (relating to Physical Education) beginning September 1, 1998.

Source: The provisions of this 116.51 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7759.


116.52. Foundations of Personal Fitness (One-Half Credit).

(a)  General requirements. This course is the recommended prerequisite for all other physical education courses.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  In Physical Education, students acquire the knowledge and skills for movement that provide the foundation for enjoyment, continued social development through physical activity, and access to a physically-active lifestyle. The student exhibits a physically-active lifestyle and understands the relationship between physical activity and health throughout the lifespan.

(2)  Foundations of Personal Fitness represents a new approach in physical education and the concept of personal fitness. The basic purpose of this course is to motivate students to strive for lifetime personal fitness with an emphasis on the health-related components of physical fitness. The knowledge and skills taught in this course include teaching students about the process of becoming fit as well as achieving some degree of fitness within the class. The concept of wellness, or striving to reach optimal levels of health, is the corner stone of this course and is exemplified by one of the course objectives-students designing their own personal fitness program.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Movement. While participating in physical activity, the student applies physiological and biomechanical principles to improve health-related fitness. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply physiological principles related to exercise and training such as warm-up/cool down, overload, frequency, intensity, specificity, or progression; and

(B)  apply biomechanical principles related to exercise and training such as force, leverage, and type of contraction.

(2)  Social development. During physical activity, the student develops positive self-management and social skills needed to work independently and with others. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply rules, procedures, and etiquette; and

(B)  recognize and resolve conflicts during physical activity.

(3)  Physical activity and health. The student applies safety practices associated with physical activity. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate safety procedures such as spotting during gymnastics and using non-skid footwear;

(B)  describe examples and exercises that may be harmful or unsafe;

(C)  explain the relationship between fluid balance, physical activity, and environmental conditions such as loss of water and salt during exercise; and

(D)  identify the effects of substance abuse on physical performance.

(4)  Physical activity and health. The student applies fitness principles during a personal fitness program. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the relationship between physical fitness and health;

(B)  participate in a variety of activities that develop health-related physical fitness activities including aerobic exercise to develop cardiovascular efficiency;

(C)  demonstrate the skill-related components of physical fitness such as agility, balance, coordination, power, reaction time, and speed;

(D)  compare and contrast health-related and skill-related fitness;

(E)  describe methods of evaluating health-related fitness such as Cooper's 1.5 mile run test;

(F)  list and describe the components of exercise prescription such as overload principle, type, progression, or specificity;

(G)  design and implement a personal fitness program; and

(H)  evaluate consumer issues related to physical fitness such as marketing claims promoting fitness products and services.

(5)  Physical activity and health. The student comprehends practices that impact daily performance, physical activity, and health. The student is expected to:

(A)  investigate positive and negative attitudes towards exercise and physical activities;

(B)  describe physical fitness activities that can be used for stress reduction;

(C)  explain how over training may contribute to negative health problems such as bulimia and anorexia;

(D)  analyze the relationship between sound nutritional practices and physical activity;

(E)  explain myths associated with physical activity and nutritional practices;

(F)  analyze methods of weight control such as diet, exercise, or combination of both; and

(G)  identify changeable risk factors such as inactivity, smoking, nutrition, and stress that affect physical activity and health.

Source: The provisions of this 116.52 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7759.


116.53. Adventure/Outdoor Education (One-Half Credit).

(a)  General requirements. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Foundations of Personal Fitness.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  In Physical Education, students acquire the knowledge and skills for movement that provide the foundation for enjoyment, continued social development through physical activity, and access to a physically-active lifestyle. The student exhibits a physically-active lifestyle and understands the relationship between physical activity and health throughout the lifespan.

(2)  Students enrolled in adventure outdoor education are expected to develop competency in outdoor education activities that provide opportunities for enjoyment and challenge. Emphasis is placed upon student selection of activities that also promote a respect for the environment and that can be enjoyed for a lifetime.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Movement. The student demonstrates competency in two or more outdoor education activities such as backpacking, boating, camping, hiking, orienteering, water sports, or water safety certification. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate consistency in the execution of the basic skills of adventure/outdoor education activities;

(B)  demonstrate understanding of the rules, skills, and strategies of an activity and can apply them appropriately; and

(C)  develop an appropriate conditioning program for the selected activity.

(2)  Physical activity and health. The student applies movement concepts and principles to the learning and development of motor skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  use internal and external information to modify movement during performance;

(B)  develop an appropriate conditioning program for the selected activity; and

(C)  identify correctly the critical elements for successful performance within the context of the activity.

(3)  Physical activity and health. The student exhibits a physically-active lifestyle that improves health and provides opportunities for enjoyment and challenge. The student is expected to:

(A)  select and participate in adventure/outdoor education activities that provide for enjoyment and challenge;

(B)  analyze and compare health and fitness benefits derived from participation in adventure/outdoor education activities;

(C)  establish realistic yet challenging health-related fitness goals;

(D)  develop and participate in a personal fitness program that has the potential to meet identified goals;

(E)  describe two training principles appropriate for enhancing flexibility, muscular strength and endurance, and cardiorespiratory endurance; and

(F)  select and use appropriate technology tools to evaluate, monitor, and improve physical development.

(4)  Physical activity and health. The student knows the relationship between outdoor activities and health. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and apply the health-related fitness principles to outdoor activities;

(B)  analyze the strengths and weaknesses of adventure/outdoor education activities and their effects on a personal fitness program;

(C)  show evidence of developing and maintaining health-related fitness;

(D)  explain and follow safety procedures during adventure/outdoor education activities;

(E)  list and describe safety equipment used in outdoor activities; and

(F)  design safe and appropriate practices/procedures to improve skill in an activity.

Source: The provisions of this 116.53 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7759.


116.54. Aerobic Activities (One-Half Credit).

(a)  General requirements. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Foundations of Personal Fitness.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  In Physical Education, students acquire the knowledge and skills for movement that provide the foundation for enjoyment, continued social development through physical activity, and access to a physically-active lifestyle. The student exhibits a physically-active lifestyle and understands the relationship between physical-activity and health throughout the lifespan.

(2)  Students in aerobic activities are exposed to a variety of activities that promote health-related fitness. A major expectation of this course is for the student to design a personal fitness program that uses aerobic activities as a foundation.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Physical activity and health. The student develops the ability to perform a level of competency in aerobic activities. The student is expected to:

(A)  exhibit a level of competency in two or more aerobic activities that may include aerobic dance, aqua aerobics, cycling, jogging, power walking, recreational dance, and step aerobics; and

(B)  consistently perform skills, strategies, and rules at a basic level of competency.

(2)  Movement. The student applies movement concepts and principles to the learning and development of motor skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  use internal and external information to modify movement during performance;

(B)  describe appropriate practices and procedures to improve skill and strategy in an activity;

(C)  develop an appropriate conditioning program for the selected activity; and

(D)  identify correctly the critical elements for successful performance within the context of the activity.

(3)  Physical activity and health. The student exhibits a physically-active lifestyle that improves health and provides opportunities for enjoyment and challenge through aerobic activity. The student is expected to:

(A)  select and participate in aerobic activities that provide for enjoyment and challenge;

(B)  analyze and evaluate personal fitness status in terms of cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition;

(C)  analyze and compare health and fitness benefits derived from participating in selected aerobic activities;

(D)  establish realistic yet challenging health-related fitness goals;

(E)  develop and participate in a personal fitness program that has the potential to provide identified goals;

(F)  describe two training principles appropriate for enhancing flexibility, muscular strength and endurance, and cardiorespiratory endurance;

(G)  select and use appropriate technology tools to evaluate, monitor, and improve physical development; and

(H)  explain the effects of substance abuse on personal health and performance in physical activity.

(4)  Physical activity and health. The student understands and applies safety practices associated with aerobic activities. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate risks and safety factors that may effect aerobic activity preferences throughout the life span;

(B)  identify and apply rules and procedures that are designed for safe participation;

(C)  explain why and how a rule provides safe practices in participation; and

(D)  describe equipment and practices that decrease the likelihood of injury such as proper footwear.

(5)  Social development. The student develops positive personal and social skills needed to work independently and with others in aerobic activities. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate personal skills and set realistic goals for improvement;

(B)  respond to challenges, successes, and failures in physical activities in socially appropriate ways;

(C)  accept successes and performance limitations of self and others, exhibit appropriate behavior/responses, and recognize that improvement is possible with appropriate practice; and

(D)  anticipate potentially dangerous consequences of participating in selected aerobic activities.

Source: The provisions of this 116.53 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7759.


116.55. Individual Sports (One-Half Credit).

(a)  General requirements. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Foundations of Personal Fitness.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  In Physical Education, students acquire movement knowledge and skills that provide the foundation for enjoyment, continued social development through physical activity, and access to a physically-active lifestyle. The student exhibits a physically-active lifestyle and understands the relationship between physical activity and health throughout the lifespan.

(2)  Students in Individual Sports are expected to participate in a wide range of individual sports that can be pursued for a lifetime. The continued development of health-related fitness and the selection of individual sport activities that are enjoyable is a major objective of this course.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Movement. The student develops the ability to participate confidently in individual sports. The student is expected to:

(A)  exhibit a level of competency in two or more individual sports that include aquatics, archery, badminton, bicycling, bowling, gymnastics, golf, handball, racquetball, self-defense, table tennis, track and field, weight training, or wrestling; and

(B)  consistently perform skills and strategies and follow rules at a basic level of competency.

(2)  Movement. The student applies movement concepts and principles to the learning and development of motor skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  use internal and external information to modify movement during performance;

(B)  describe appropriate practice procedures to improve skill and strategy in a sport;

(C)  develop an appropriate conditioning program for the selected sport; and

(D)  identify correctly the critical elements for successful performance of a sport skill.

(3)  Social development. The student understands the basic components such as strategies, protocol, and rules of individual sports. The student is expected to:

(A)  acknowledge good play from an opponent during competition;

(B)  accept the roles and decisions of officials;

(C)  demonstrate officiating techniques; and

(D)  research and describe the historical development of an individual sport.

(4)  Physical activity and health. The student exhibits a physically-active lifestyle that improves health and provides opportunities for enjoyment and challenge during individual sports. The student is expected to:

(A)  select and participate in individual sports that provide for enjoyment and challenge;

(B)  analyze and evaluate personal fitness status in terms of cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition;

(C)  analyze and compare health and fitness benefits derived from participating in selected individual sports;

(D)  establish realistic yet challenging health-related fitness goals for selected individual sports;

(E)  explain the interrelatedness between selected individual sports and a personal fitness program;

(F)  describe two training principles appropriate for enhancing flexibility, muscular strength and endurance, and cardiorespiratory endurance; and

(G)  explain the effects of substance abuse on personal health and performance in physical activity such as side effects of steroid use.

(5)  Physical activity and health. The student understands and applies safety practices associated with individual sports. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate risks and safety factors that may affect individual sport preferences;

(B)  identify and follow safety procedures when participating in individual sports; and

(C)  describe equipment and practices that prevent or reduce injuries.

(6)  Social development. The student develops positive personal and social skills needed to work independently and with others in individual sports. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate personal skills and set realistic goals for improvement;

(B)  respond to challenges, successes, and failures in physical activities in socially appropriate ways;

(C)  accept successes and performance limitations of self and others;

(D)  anticipate potentially dangerous consequences of participating in selected individual sports; and

(E)  demonstrate responsible behavior in individual sports such as playing by the rules, accepting lack of skill in others.

Source: The provisions of this 116.55 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7759.


116.56. Team Sports (One-Half Credit).

(a)  General requirements. The recommended prerequisite for this course is Foundations of Personal Fitness.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  In Physical Education, students acquire the knowledge and skills for movement that provide the foundation for enjoyment, continued social development through physical activity, and access to a physically-active lifestyle. The student exhibits a physically-active lifestyle and understands the relationship between physical activity and health throughout the lifespan.

(2)  Students enrolled in Team Sports are expected to develop health-related fitness and an appreciation for team work and fair play. Like the other high school physical education courses, Team Sports is less concerned with the acquisition of physical fitness during the course than reinforcing the concept of incorporating physical activity into a lifestyle beyond high school.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Movement skills. The student demonstrates competency in many movement forms and proficiency in two or more team sports such as basketball, field hockey, flag football, floor hockey, soccer, softball, team handball, or volleyball. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate consistency using all the basic offensive skills of a sport while participating in a game such as dribbling, batting, or spiking competently in a dynamic setting; and

(B)  demonstrate consistency using all the basic defensive skills of a sport while participating in a game such as guarding, trapping, blocking, fielding, tackling, or goalkeeping competently in a dynamic setting.

(2)  Movement skills. The student applies movement concepts and principles to the learning and development of motor skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  use internal and external information to modify movement during performance;

(B)  describe appropriate practice procedures to improve skill and strategy in an activity;

(C)  develop an appropriate conditioning program for the selected activity;

(D)  identify correctly the critical elements for successful performance within the context of the activity; and

(E)  recognize that improvement is possible with appropriate practice.

(3)  Social development. The student understands the basic components such as strategies, protocol, and rules of structured physical activities. The student is expected to:

(A)  acknowledge good play from an opponent during competition;

(B)  accept the roles and decisions of officials;

(C)  demonstrate officiating techniques; and

(D)  research and describe the historical development of an individual sport.

(4)  Physical activity and health. The student exhibits a physically-active lifestyle that improves health and provides opportunities for enjoyment and challenge through team sports. The student is expected to:

(A)  select and participate in individual sports that provide for enjoyment and challenge;

(B)  analyze and evaluate personal fitness status in terms of cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition;

(C)  describe the health and fitness benefits derived from participating in selected team sports;

(D)  establish realistic yet challenging health-related fitness goals;

(E)  develop and participate in a personal fitness program that has the potential to provide identified goals; and

(F)  describe two training principles appropriate for enhancing flexibility, muscular strength and endurance, and cardiorespiratory endurance.

(5)  Physical activity and health. The student knows the implications and benefits from being involved in daily physical activity. The student is expected to:

(A)  discuss training principles appropriate for enhancing flexibility, muscular strength and endurance, and cardiorespiratory endurance;

(B)  explain the effects of eating and exercise patterns on weight control, self-concept, and physical performance; and

(C)  explain the effects of substance abuse on personal health and performance in physical activity.

(6)  Physical activity and health. The student understands and applies safety practices associated with team sports. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate risks and safety factors that may affect sport preferences;

(B)  identify and apply rules and procedures that are designed for safe participation in team sports;

(C)  identify team sports that achieve health-related fitness goals in both school and community settings; and

(D)  participate regularly in team sports.

(7)  Social development. The student develops positive self-management and social skills needed to work independently and with others in team sports. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate personal skills and set realistic goals for improvement;

(B)  respond to challenges, successes, and failures in physical activities in socially appropriate ways;

(C)  accept successes and performance limitations of self and others and exhibit appropriate behavior/responses;

(D)  anticipate potentially dangerous consequences of participating in selected team sports; and

(E)  display appropriate etiquette while participating in a sport.

Source: The provisions of this 116.56 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7759.


For additional information, email rules@tea.state.tx.us.