Chapter 117. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts
Subchapter C. High School


Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter C issued under the Texas Education Code, 28.002, unless otherwise noted.


117.51. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts, High School.

The provisions of this subchapter shall supersede 75.67 of this title (relating to Fine Arts) beginning September 1, 1998.

Source: The provisions of this 117.51 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


117.52. Art, Level I.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing the following art course: Art I (one credit).

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Students rely on their perceptions of the environment, developed through increasing visual awareness and sensitivity to surroundings, memory, imagination, and life experiences, as a source for creating artworks. They express their thoughts and ideas creatively, while challenging their imagination, fostering reflective thinking, and developing disciplined effort and problem-solving skills.

(2)  By analyzing artistic styles and historical periods students develop respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. Students respond to and analyze artworks, thus contributing to the development of lifelong skills of making informed judgments and evaluations.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student develops and organizes ideas from the environment. The student is expected to:

(A)  illustrate ideas for artworks from direct observation, experiences, and imagination; and

(B)  compare and contrast the use of art elements (color, texture, form, line, space, value) and art principles (emphasis, pattern, rhythm, balance, proportion, unity) in personal artworks and those of others, using vocabulary accurately.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student expresses ideas through original artworks, using a variety of media with appropriate skill. The student is expected to:

(A)  create visual solutions by elaborating on direct observation, experiences, and imagination;

(B)  create designs for practical applications; and

(C)  demonstrate effective use of art media and tools in design, drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture.

(3)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture as records of human achievement. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast historical and contemporary styles, identifying general themes and trends;

(B)  describe general characteristics in artworks from a variety of cultures; and

(C)  compare and contrast career and avocational opportunities in art.

(4)  Response/evaluation. The student makes informed judgments about personal artworks and the artworks of others. The student is expected to:

(A)  interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in personal artworks; and

(B)  select and analyze original artworks, portfolios, and exhibitions by peers and others to form precise conclusions about formal qualities, historical and cultural contexts, intents, and meanings.

Source: The provisions of this 117.52 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


117.53. Art, Level II.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following art courses: Drawing II, Painting II, Printmaking II, Fibers II, Ceramics II, Sculpture II, Jewelry II, Photography II, Electronic Media II (one credit per course). The prerequisite for each Level II art course is one credit of Art I.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Students rely on their perceptions of the environment, developed through increasing visual awareness and sensitivity to surroundings, memory, imagination, and life experiences, as a source for creating artworks. They express their thoughts and ideas creatively, while challenging their imagination, fostering reflective thinking, and developing disciplined effort and problem-solving skills.

(2)  By analyzing artistic styles and historical periods students develop respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. Students respond to and analyze artworks, thus contributing to the development of lifelong skills of making informed judgments and evaluations.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student develops and organizes ideas from the environment. The student is expected to:

(A)  interpret visual parallels between the structures of natural and human-made environments; and

(B)  compare suitability of art materials and processes to express specific ideas relating to visual themes, using precise art vocabulary.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student expresses ideas through original artworks, using a variety of media with appropriate skill. The student is expected to:

(A)  formulate multiple solutions to expand personal themes that demonstrate intent;

(B)  apply design skills in creating practical applications, clarifying presentations, and defining choices made by consumers; and

(C)  select from a variety of art media and tools to communicate specific ideas in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, fiberart, jewelry, photography/filmmaking, and electronic media-generated art.

(3)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture as records of human achievement. The student is expected to:

(A)  study a selected historical period or style of art;

(B)  analyze specific characteristics of artworks in various cultures; and

(C)  select and research career and avocational choices in art.

(4)  Response/evaluation. The student makes informed judgments about personal artworks and the artworks of others. The student is expected to:

(A)  select and critique artworks in progress, making decisions about future directions in personal work; and

(B)  select and critique original artworks, portfolios, and exhibitions by peers or others.

Source: The provisions of this 117.53 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


117.54. Art, Level III.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following art courses: Drawing III, Painting III, Printmaking III, Fibers III, Ceramics III, Sculpture III, Jewelry III, Photography III, Art History III, Graphic Design III, Electronic Media III, the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Drawing Portfolio, AP Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP History of Art, International Baccalaureate (IB) Art/Design SL Option A, IB Art/Design SL Option B, IB Art/Design HL (one credit per course). The prerequisite for Art History III, Graphic Design III, AP Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP History of Art, IB Art/Design SL Option A, IB Art/Design SL Option B, and IB Art/Design HL is one credit of any Art II course. The prerequisite for all other Level III art courses is one credit of Art II in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Students rely on their perceptions of the environment, developed through increasing visual awareness and sensitivity to surroundings, memory, imagination, and life experiences, as a source for creating artworks. They express their thoughts and ideas creatively, while challenging their imagination, fostering reflective thinking, and developing disciplined effort and problem-solving skills.

(2)  By analyzing artistic styles and historical periods students develop respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. Students respond to and analyze artworks, thus contributing to the development of lifelong skills of making informed judgments and evaluations.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student develops and organizes ideas from the environment. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze visual characteristics of natural and human-made subjects in a variety of ways, illustrating flexibility in solving problems, creating multiple solutions, and thinking imaginatively; and

(B)  analyze visual qualities to express the meaning of images and symbols, using precise art vocabulary.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student expresses ideas through original artworks, using a variety of media with appropriate skill. The student is expected to:

(A)  solve visual problems by planning and attempting a variety of solutions;

(B)  solve visual problems and develop multiple solutions for designing ideas, clarifying presentations, and evaluating consumer choices, using design skills; and

(C)  select from a variety of art media and tools to express intent in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, fiberart, jewelry, photography/filmmaking, and electronic media-generated art.

(3)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture as records of human achievement. The student is expected to:

(A)  study a selected period, style, or movement in art;

(B)  trace influences of various cultures on contemporary artworks; and

(C)  analyze a selected career opportunity in art, identifying the training, skills, and plan of action necessary for realizing such a goal.

(4)  Response/evaluation. The student makes informed judgments about personal artworks and the artworks of others. The student is expected to:

(A)  select artworks for a personal portfolio based on evaluation of developmental progress, competency in problem-solving, and a variety of visual ideas; and

(B)  analyze original artworks, portfolios, and exhibitions to form conclusions about formal qualities, historical and cultural contexts, intents, and meanings and to show innovation and provide examples of in-depth exploration of one or more themes.

Source: The provisions of this 117.54 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943; amended to be effective September 1, 2001, 26 TexReg 5808.


117.55. Art, Level IV.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following art courses: Drawing IV, Painting IV, Printmaking IV, Fibers IV, Ceramics IV, Sculpture IV, Jewelry IV, Photography IV, Graphic Design IV, Electronic Media IV, the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Drawing Portfolio, AP Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP History of Art, International Baccalaureate (IB) Art/Design SL Option A, IB Art/Design SL Option B, and IB Art/Design HL (one credit per course). The prerequisite for AP Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP History of Art, IB Art/Design SL Option A, IB Art/Design SL Option B, and IB Art/Design HL is one credit of any Art II course. The prerequisite for all other Level IV art courses is one credit of Art III in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Students rely on their perceptions of the environment, developed through increasing visual awareness and sensitivity to surroundings, memory, imagination, and life experiences, as a source for creating artworks. They express their thoughts and ideas creatively, while challenging their imagination, fostering reflective thinking, and developing disciplined effort and problem-solving skills.

(2)  By analyzing artistic styles and historical periods students develop respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. Students respond to and analyze artworks, thus contributing to the development of lifelong skills of making informed judgments and evaluations.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student develops and organizes ideas from the environment. The student is expected to:

(A)  create themes for personal artworks that integrate a broad range of visual observations, experiences, and imagination; and

(B)  make subtle discriminations in analyzing complex visual relationships and content, using precise art vocabulary.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student expresses ideas through original artworks, using a variety of media with appropriate skill. The student is expected to:

(A)  produce an original body of artwork that integrates information from a variety of sources and demonstrates sustained, self-directed investigations into specific themes;

(B)  evaluate and justify design ideas and concepts for use in personal artworks; and

(C)  create artworks, singularly and in series, by selecting from a variety of art materials and tools appropriate to course work in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, fiberart, jewelry, photography/filmmaking, and electronic media-generated art.

(3)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture as records of human achievement. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and illustrate art history as a major source of interpretation;

(B)  analyze and evaluate the influence of contemporary cultures on artworks; and

(C)  evaluate a selected career in art, justifying the choice.

(4)  Response/evaluation. The student makes informed judgments about personal artworks and the artworks of others. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop evaluative criteria for selecting artworks to include in a portfolio and senior exhibition that demonstrate a high level of creativity and expertise in one or more art areas; and

(B)  analyze a wide range of artworks to form conclusions about formal qualities, historical and cultural contexts, intents, and meanings.

Source: The provisions of this 117.55 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943; amended to be effective September 1, 2001, 26 TexReg 5808.


117.56. Dance, Level I.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing the following dance course: Dance I (one credit).

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Dance students develop perceptual thinking and moving abilities in daily life that promote understanding of themselves and others and allow them to interact effectively in the community. By mastering movement principles and skills, students develop self-discipline, and healthy bodies that move expressively, efficiently, and safely through space and time with controlled energy.

(2)  Students recognize dance as a vehicle for understanding cultural and historical contexts, increasing awareness of their own and others' heritage and traditions, thus helping them to participate in a diverse society. Evaluating and analyzing dance strengthen decision-making skills, develop critical and creative thinking, and enable students to make informed decisions about dance and the world around them.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student develops an awareness of the body's movement, using sensory information while dancing. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate basic kinesthetic and spatial awareness with others;

(B)  develop sensitivity toward others when working in groups;

(C)  express ideas and emotions through movement; and

(D)  interpret images found in the environment through movement.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student applies body sciences and fitness principles to dance. The student is expected to:

(A)  communicate using appropriate anatomical terminology;

(B)  demonstrate basic principles of proper skeletal alignment; and

(C)  practice an effective warm-up and cool-down, using elements of proper conditioning.

(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student develops knowledge and skills of dance elements and of choreographic processes and forms in a variety of dance styles. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform memorized movement sequences with rhythmical accuracy in several dance styles, including classical ballet, tap, modern, and ethnic dance;

(B)  identify the effective use of dance elements in practice and performance;

(C)  improvise and demonstrate original movement; and

(D)  perform basic compositional forms, using fundamental choreographic processes.

(4)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student demonstrates an understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the characteristics of dances from several diverse cultures;

(B)  perform dance phrases or dances from several time periods with an understanding of historical and social contexts; and

(C)  identify historical figures and their significance in dance history.

(5)  Response/evaluation. The student makes informed judgments about dance's form, meaning, and role in society. The student is expected to:

(A)  incorporate appropriate movement vocabulary when identifying qualities and discussing meaning of performance and production in dance;

(B)  demonstrate appropriate audience behavior and etiquette in the classroom and at performances;

(C)  identify relationships between dance and other fine art subjects; and

(D)  distinguish commonalities between dance and subject areas such as English, mathematics, science, and social studies.

Source: The provisions of this 117.56 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


117.57. Dance, Level II.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing the following dance course: Dance II (one credit). Dance I is a prerequisite for Dance II.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Dance students develop perceptual thinking and moving abilities in daily life that promote understanding of themselves and others and allow them to interact effectively in the community. By mastering movement principles and skills, students develop self-discipline, and healthy bodies that move expressively, efficiently, and safely through space and time with controlled energy.

(2)  Students recognize dance as a vehicle for understanding cultural and historical contexts, increasing awareness of their own and others' heritage and traditions, thus helping them to participate in a diverse society. Evaluating and analyzing dance strengthen decision-making skills, develop critical and creative thinking, and enable students to make informed decisions about dance and the world around them.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student develops an awareness of the body's movement, using sensory information while dancing. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate a developing kinesthetic and spatial awareness;

(B)  demonstrate respect for others when working in groups;

(C)  demonstrate effectively the connection between emotions and movement; and

(D)  identify details in movement in natural and constructed environments.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student applies body sciences and fitness principles to dance. The student is expected to:

(A)  communicate using appropriate anatomical and dance terminology;

(B)  perform with proper skeletal alignment;

(C)  exhibit strength, flexibility, and endurance in dance training and performances; and

(D)  incorporate proper conditioning and injury prevention practices.

(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student develops knowledge and skills of dance elements and of choreographic processes and forms in a variety of dance styles. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform extended movement patterns with rhythmic accuracy in traditional concert dance styles;

(B)  demonstrate the elements of dance effectively;

(C)  improvise dance phrases, using the concept of abstraction; and

(D)  incorporate choreographic processes such as retrograde and inversion in dance styles.

(4)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student demonstrates an understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform dances of various cultures;

(B)  choreograph short dance phrases that exhibit an understanding of various historical periods; and

(C)  perform dances in various mediums such as musical theatre, film, and video.

(5)  Response/evaluation. The student makes informed judgments about dance's form, meaning, and role in society. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify characteristics of a variety of dances;

(B)  analyze qualities of performance and production in dance;

(C)  identify similarities of form and expression in dance and other fine arts; and

(D)  identify and apply dance and dance-related skills such as creative problem-solving, cooperation, and self-discipline to various work experience.

Source: The provisions of this 117.57 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


117.58. Dance, Level III.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing the following dance course: Dance III (one credit). Dance I and Dance II are prerequisites for Dance III.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Dance students develop perceptual thinking and moving abilities in daily life that promote understanding of themselves and others and allow them to interact effectively in the community. By mastering movement principles and skills, students develop self-discipline, and healthy bodies that move expressively, efficiently, and safely through space and time with controlled energy.

(2)  Students recognize dance as a vehicle for understanding cultural and historical contexts, increasing awareness of their own and others' heritage and traditions, thus helping them to participate in a diverse society. Evaluating and analyzing dance strengthen decision-making skills, develop critical and creative thinking, and enable students to make informed decisions about dance and the world around them.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student develops an awareness of the body's movement, using sensory information while dancing. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate a kinesthetic and spatial awareness;

(B)  work respectfully with others;

(C)  demonstrate effectively the connection between emotions and ideas and movement; and

(D)  identify designs and images in natural and constructed environments.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student applies body sciences and fitness principles to dance. The student is expected to:

(A)  communicate using appropriate anatomical and dance terminology;

(B)  perform using basic principles of skeletal alignment;

(C)  exhibit strength, flexibility, and endurance in training and performances; and

(D)  incorporate injury prevention procedures when exercising, practicing, and performing.

(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student develops knowledge and skills of dance elements and of choreographic processes and forms in a variety of dance styles. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform memorized complex movement sequences with rhythmic accuracy in traditional concert dance styles;

(B)  demonstrate a wide range of dynamics in quality movement;

(C)  perform with projection, confidence, and expression when executing dance movements; and

(D)  create dance studies, using original movement, based on theme, variation, and/or chance.

(4)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student demonstrates an understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe similarities and differences in steps, styles, and traditions in dances from various cultures and historical periods; and

(B)  choreograph a dance based on a historical event or theme.

(5)  Response/evaluation. The student makes informed judgments about dance's form, meaning, and role in society. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare characteristics and qualities of a variety of dances;

(B)  analyze dance from a variety of perspectives such as those of dance critic, performer, choreographer, and audience member;

(C)  compare and contrast the use of form and expression in dance with their use in art, music, theatre, and other subject areas; and

(D)  identify opportunities in dance as a profession.

Source: The provisions of this 117.58 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


117.59. Dance, Level IV.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing the following dance course: Dance IV (one credit). Dance I, Dance II, and Dance III are prerequisites for Dance IV.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/ performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Dance students develop perceptual thinking and moving abilities in daily life that promote understanding of themselves and others and allow them to interact effectively in the community. By mastering movement principles and skills, students develop self-discipline, and healthy bodies that move expressively, efficiently, and safely through space and time with controlled energy.

(2)  Students recognize dance as a vehicle for understanding cultural and historical contexts, increasing awareness of their own and others' heritage and traditions thus helping them to participate in a diverse society. Evaluating and analyzing dance strengthen decision-making skills, develop critical and creative thinking, and enable students to make informed decisions about dance and the world around them.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student develops an awareness of the body's movement, using sensory information while dancing. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate refined kinesthetic and spatial awareness, using self-evaluation, insights, movement inflection, and interpretation;

(B)  lead peers with understanding and respect;

(C)  communicate nonverbally using dance movements; and

(D)  apply designs and images found in natural and constructed environments to dance.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student applies body sciences and fitness principles to dance. The student is expected to:

(A)  communicate using anatomical and dance terminology correctly;

(B)  create an effective personal conditioning program; and

(C)  demonstrate a knowledge of injury prevention rules and other health-related principles when exercising, practicing, and performing.

(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student develops knowledge and skills of dance elements and of choreographic processes and forms in a variety of dance styles. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate consistency in performing advanced technical dance skills in traditional concert dance styles;

(B)  perform dance movements with a refined sense of rhythm and musicality and with clarity, expressiveness, and a wide range of spatial qualities;

(C)  create original dances, using improvisation and other choreographic processes; and

(D)  create a solo and/or group dance using thematic development, variation, and resolution to successfully communicate an idea.

(4)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student demonstrates an understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze choreography in dances from various cultures; and

(B)  research and create a project illustrating an understanding of significant dance events or historical figures in appropriate social, historical, and cultural contexts.

(5)  Response/evaluation. The student makes informed judgments about dance's form, meaning, and role in society. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate personal work and the work of others, using a valid rationale and demonstrating sensitivity toward others;

(B)  analyze the role of dance and other fine arts in society; and

(C)  analyze technology's effects on the professions of dance and other fine arts.

Source: The provisions of this 117.59 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


117.60. Music, Level I.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following music courses: Band I, Choir I, Orchestra I, Jazz Band I, Instrumental Ensemble I, Vocal Ensemble I, Music History I, Music Theory I, Applied Music I (one credit per course).

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. In music, students develop their intellect and refine their emotions, understanding the cultural and creative nature of musical artistry and making connections among music, the other arts, technology, and other aspects of social life. Through creative performance, students apply the expressive technical skills of music and critical-thinking skills to evaluate multiple forms of problem solving.

(2)  By reflecting on musical periods and styles, students understand music's role in history and are able to participate successfully in a diverse society. Students analyze and evaluate music, developing criteria for making critical judgments and informed choices.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student describes and analyzes musical sound and demonstrates musical artistry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify melodic and harmonic parts when listening to and/or performing music;

(B)  define concepts of intervals, music notation, chord structure, rhythm/meter, and musical performances using standard terminology; and

(C)  compare and contrast elements of music through literature selected for performance and/or listening.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student sings or plays an instrument, individually and in groups, performing a varied repertoire of music. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate independently and in ensembles accurate intonation and rhythm, fundamental skills, and basic performance techniques while performing moderately easy to moderately difficult literature;

(B)  perform expressively, from memory and notation, a varied repertoire of music representing styles from diverse cultures; and

(C)  exhibit and explain appropriate small- and large-ensemble performance techniques for formal and informal concerts.

(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student reads and writes music notation. The student is expected to:

(A)  sight-read ensemble parts;

(B)  read and write music that incorporates rhythmic patterns in simple, compound, and asymmetric meters; and

(C)  interpret music symbols and terms referring to dynamics, tempo, and articulation during solo and ensemble performances.

(4)  Creative expression/performance. The student creates and arranges music within specified guidelines. The student is expected to:

(A)  create a variety of musical phrases; and

(B)  arrange a variety of musical phrases.

(5)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student relates music to history, to society, and to culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  listen to and classify music by style and/or by historical period;

(B)  identify and describe the uses of music in society and culture;

(C)  identify music-related vocations and avocations within the community; and

(D)  define the relationships between the content, the concepts, and the processes of the other fine arts, other subjects, and those of music.

(6)  Response/evaluation. The student responds to and evaluates music and musical performance. The student is expected to:

(A)  design and apply criteria for making informed judgments regarding the quality and effectiveness of musical performances;

(B)  evaluate musical performances by comparing them to exemplary models; and

(C)  practice informed concert behavior during live performances in a variety of settings.

Source: The provisions of this 117.60 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


117.61. Music, Level II.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following music courses: Band II, Choir II, Orchestra II, Jazz Band II, Instrumental Ensemble II, Vocal Ensemble II, Music Theory II, Applied Music II (one credit per course). The prerequisite for each Level II music course is one credit of Music I in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. In music, students develop their intellect and refine their emotions, understanding the cultural and creative nature of musical artistry and making connections among music, the other arts, technology, and other aspects of social life. Through creative performance, students apply the expressive technical skills of music and critical-thinking skills to evaluate multiple forms of problem solving.

(2)  By reflecting on musical periods and styles, students understand music's role in history and are able to participate successfully in a diverse society. Students analyze and evaluate music, developing criteria for making critical judgments and informed choices.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student describes and analyzes musical sound and demonstrates musical artistry. The student is expected to:

(A)  define melody, harmony, rhythm, and texture of music listened to or performed, using standard terminology; and

(B)  compare and contrast music forms of literature selected for performances and/or listening.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student sings or plays an instrument, individually and in groups, performing a varied repertoire of music. The student is expected to:

(A)  exhibit accurate intonation and rhythm, fundamental skills, and basic performance techniques while performing moderately difficult literature, independently and in ensembles;

(B)  perform expressively, from memory and notation, a varied repertoire of music representing genres and styles from diverse cultures; and

(C)  exhibit and describe appropriate small- and large-ensemble performance techniques for formal and informal concerts.

(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student reads and writes music notation. The student is expected to:

(A)  sight-read ensemble parts;

(B)  read and write music that incorporates rhythmic patterns in simple, compound, and asymmetric meters; and

(C)  interpret music symbols and terms referring to dynamics, tempo, and articulation during solo and/or ensemble performances.

(4)  Creative expression/performance. The student creates and arranges music within specified guidelines. The student is expected to:

(A)  create simple musical pieces; and

(B)  arrange simple musical pieces.

(5)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student relates music to history, to society, and to culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  classify aurally-presented music by genre, style, and historical period;

(B)  define uses of music in society and culture;

(C)  identify music-related vocations and avocations within the community; and

(D)  define the relationships between the content, the concepts, and the processes of the other fine arts, other subjects, and those of music.

(6)  Response/evaluation. The student responds to and evaluates music and musical performance. The student is expected to:

(A)  design and apply criteria for making informed judgments regarding the quality and effectiveness of musical performances;

(B)  evaluate musical performances by comparing them to exemplary models; and

(C)  exhibit concert etiquette during live performances in a variety of settings.

Source: The provisions of this 117.61 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


117.62. Music, Level III.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following music courses: Band III, Choir III, Orchestra III, Jazz Band III, Instrumental Ensemble III, Vocal Ensemble III, the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Music Theory, International Baccalaureate (IB) Music SL, IB Music HL (one credit per course). The prerequisite for IB Music SL and IB Music HL is one credit of any Music II course. The prerequisite for all other Level III music courses is one credit of Music II in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. In music, students develop their intellect and refine their emotions, understanding the cultural and creative nature of musical artistry and making connections among music, the other arts, technology, and other aspects of social life. Through creative performance, students apply the expressive technical skills of music and critical-thinking skills to evaluate multiple forms of problem solving.

(2)  By reflecting on musical periods and styles, students understand music's role in history and are able to participate successfully in a diverse society. Students analyze and evaluate music, developing criteria for making critical judgments and informed choices.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student describes and analyzes musical sound and demonstrates musical artistry. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform appropriate literature expressively;

(B)  define musical performances, intervals, music notation, chord structure, rhythm/meter, and harmonic texture, using standard terminology; and

(C)  identify music forms of performance and listening repertoire.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student sings or plays an instrument, individually and in groups, performing a varied repertoire of music. The student is expected to:

(A)  exhibit accurate intonation and rhythm, fundamental skills, and advanced techniques, using literature ranging from moderately difficult to difficult, while performing independently and in ensemble;

(B)  demonstrate comprehension of musical styles by seeking appropriate literature for performance;

(C)  perform expressively, from memory and notation, a varied repertoire of music representing styles from diverse cultures; and

(D)  exhibit, describe, and critique small- and large-ensemble performance techniques experienced and observed during formal and informal concerts.

(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student reads and writes music notation. The student is expected to:

(A)  sight-read major, minor, modal, and chromatic melodies;

(B)  read and write music that incorporates complex rhythmic patterns in simple, compound, and asymmetric meters; and

(C)  interpret music symbols and terms referring to dynamics, tempo, and articulation when performing.

(4)  Creative expression/performance. The student creates and arranges music within specified guidelines. The student is expected to:

(A)  improvise musical melodies; and

(B)  compose or arrange segments of vocal or instrumental pieces (manuscript or computer-generated).

(5)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student relates music to history, to society, and to culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  classify by style and by historical period or culture representative examples of music, justifying the classifications;

(B)  identify and describe the effects of society, culture, and technology on music;

(C)  identify and describe music-related career options including musical performance and music teaching; and

(D)  define the relationships between the content, the concepts, and the processes of the other fine arts, other subjects, and those of music.

(6)  Response/evaluation. The student responds to and evaluates music and musical performance. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate musical performances by comparing them to similar or exemplary models and offering constructive suggestions for improvement; and

(B)  exhibit informed concert etiquette during live performances in a variety of settings.

Source: The provisions of this 117.62 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


117.63. Music, Level IV.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following music courses: Band IV, Choir IV, Orchestra IV, Jazz Band IV, Instrumental Ensemble IV, Vocal Ensemble IV, the College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Music Theory, International Baccalaureate (IB) Music SL, IB Music HL (one credit per course). The prerequisite for IB Music SL and IB Music HL is one credit of any Music III course. The prerequisite for all other Level IV music courses is one credit of Music III in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. In music, students develop their intellect and refine their emotions, understanding the cultural and creative nature of musical artistry and making connections among music, the other arts, technology, and other aspects of social life. Through creative performance, students apply the expressive technical skills of music and critical-thinking skills to evaluate multiple forms of problem solving.

(2)  By reflecting on musical periods and styles, students understand music's role in history and are able to participate successfully in a diverse society. Students analyze and evaluate music, developing criteria for making critical judgments and informed choices.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student describes and analyzes musical sound and demonstrates musical artistry. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate independence in interpreting music through the performance of appropriate literature;

(B)  analyze musical performances, intervals, music notation, chordal structure, rhythm/meter, and harmonic texture, using standard terminology; and

(C)  analyze music forms of performance and listening repertoire.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student sings or plays an instrument, individually and in groups, performing a varied repertoire of music. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform independently, demonstrating accurate intonation and rhythm, fundamental skills, and advanced techniques, and using literature ranging from moderately difficult to difficult;

(B)  demonstrate comprehension of musical styles by selecting appropriate literature for performances;

(C)  perform expressively, from memory and notation, a varied repertoire of music representing styles from diverse cultures; and

(D)  exhibit, describe, and critique small- and large- ensemble performance techniques experienced and observed during formal and informal concerts.

(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student reads and writes music notation. The student is expected to:

(A)  sight-read major, minor, modal, and chromatic melodies;

(B)  read and write music that incorporates complex rhythmic patterns in simple, compound, and asymmetric meters; and

(C)  interpret music symbols and terms referring to dynamics, tempo, and articulation when performing.

(4)  Creative expression/performance. The student creates and arranges music within specified guidelines. The student is expected to:

(A)  improvise musical melodies; and

(B)  compose or arrange vocal or instrumental pieces (manuscript or computer-generated).

(5)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student relates music to history, to society, and to culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  classify representative examples of music by style and by historical period or culture, justifying the classifications;

(B)  describe the effects of music on society, culture, and technology;

(C)  explain a variety of music and music-related career options; and

(D)  define the relationships between the content, the concepts, and the processes of the other fine arts and those of music.

(6)  Response/evaluation. The student responds to and evaluates music and musical performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate musical performances and compositions by comparing them to similar or exemplary models and offering constructive suggestions for improvement; and

(B)  exhibit concert etiquette during live performances in a variety of settings.

Source: The provisions of this 117.63 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


117.64. Theatre, Level I.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following theatre courses: Theatre Arts I (one credit), Technical Theatre I (one credit), Theatre Production I (one-half to one credit). Theatre Arts I is a prerequisite for all theatre courses.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through perceptual studies, students increase their understanding of self and others and develop clear ideas about the world. Through a variety of theatrical experiences, students communicate in a dramatic form, make artistic choices, solve problems, build positive self-concepts, and relate interpersonally.

(2)  Students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions through historical and cultural studies in theatre. Student response and evaluation promote thinking and further discriminating judgment, developing students who are appreciative and evaluative consumers of live theatre, film, television, and other technologies.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment, using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  improvise, using emotional and sensory recall;

(B)  develop and practice theatre preparation and warm-up techniques;

(C)  employ stage movement and pantomime consistently to express thoughts, feelings, and actions;

(D)  develop and practice effective voice and diction to express thoughts and feelings;

(E)  define and give examples of theatrical conventions (time, setting, fourth wall, visual elements); and

(F)  analyze and describe the interdependence of all theatrical elements.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student interprets characters, using the voice and body expressively, and creates dramatizations. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate safe use of the voice and body;

(B)  analyze a character from a script, describing physical, intellectual, emotional, and social dimensions;

(C)  portray believable characters when applying acting concepts, skills, and techniques; and

(D)  improvise, write, and refine monologues, scenes, and vignettes to convey meaning to the audience.

(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student applies design, directing, and theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop and practice stage-craft skills;

(B)  safely apply technical knowledge and skills to create and/or operate functional scenery, properties, lighting, sound, costumes, makeup, and publicity;

(C)  define the director's role as a unifying force, problem-solver, interpreter of script, and collaborator;

(D)  define the director's responsibility to the author's intent, script, actors, designers, technicians, and the audience;

(E)  perform the roles of actor, ensemble member, and director in production decision making and collaborates with others to produce theatre with a unified production for public performance; and

(F)  concentrate in one or more areas of theatre production (acting, technical theatre, theatre management), demonstrating responsibility, artistic discipline, and creative problem solving.

(4)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student relates theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  portray theatre as a reflection of life in particular times, places, and cultures; and

(B)  relate historical and cultural influences on theatre and analyze the roles of live theatre, film, television, and electronic media in American society.

(5)  Response/evaluation. The student responds to and evaluates theatre and theatrical performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze and apply appropriate behavior at various types of live performances;

(B)  develop appropriate theatre vocabulary to apply the concepts of evaluation (intent, structure, effectiveness, value) to live theatre, film, television, and electronic media in written and oral form with precise and specific observations;

(C)  identify and compare the treatment of moods in theatre, musical theatre, dance, art, and music and integrate more than one art form in informal performances; and

(D)  select career and avocational opportunities in theatre and describe the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed to pursue them.

Source: The provisions of this 117.64 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


117.65. Theatre, Level II.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following theatre courses: Theatre Arts II (one credit), Technical Theatre II (one credit), Theatre Production II (one-half to one credit). The prerequisite for each Level II theatre course is one credit of Theatre I in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through perceptual studies, students increase their understanding of self and others and develop clear ideas about the world. Through a variety of theatrical experiences, students communicate in a dramatic form, make artistic choices, solve problems, build positive self-concepts, and relate interpersonally.

(2)  Students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions through historical and cultural studies in theatre. Student response and evaluation promote thinking and further discriminating judgment, developing students who are appreciative and evaluative consumers of live theatre, film, television, and other technologies.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment, using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  practice warm-up techniques;

(B)  employ stage movement and pantomime consistently;

(C)  demonstrate effective voice and diction;

(D)  analyze dramatic structure and genre;

(E)  identify examples of theatrical conventions in theatre, film, television, and electronic media; and

(F)  relate the interdependence of all theatrical elements.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student interprets characters, using the voice and body expressively, and creates dramatizations. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate safe use of the voice and body;

(B)  analyze characters from various genres and media, describing physical, intellectual, emotional, and social dimensions;

(C)  create and sustain believable characters; and

(D)  improvise and write dialogue that reveals character motivation in short vignettes.

(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student applies design, directing, and theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  construct and operate the technical elements of theatre safely and effectively;

(B)  examine cultural, social, and political aspects of a script to depict appropriately technical elements;

(C)  consider script selection, casting, and directing skills;

(D)  define the director's responsibility to the author's intent, script, actors, designers, technicians, and the audience;

(E)  compare the roles of actor, ensemble, and director in production decision making and produce theatre with a unified production concept and style for public performance; and

(F)  select one or more areas of theatre production, demonstrating responsibility, artistic discipline, and creative problem solving.

(4)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student relates theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze historical and cultural influences on theatre; and

(B)  define the influence of American society on live theatre and film.

(5)  Response/evaluation. The student responds to and evaluates theatre and theatrical performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  judge and apply appropriate audience behavior at various types of performances;

(B)  evaluate emotional responses to and personal preferences for dramatic performances, using appropriate theatre vocabulary, and apply the concepts of evaluation (intent, structure, effectiveness, value) to live theatre, film, television, and electronic media in written and oral form with precise and specific observations;

(C)  identify the treatment of theme, character, setting, and action in theatre, musical theatre, dance, art, and music and integrate more than one art form in informal presentations; and

(D)  select career and avocational opportunities in theatre and film and explore the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed to pursue them.

Source: The provisions of this 117.65 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


117.66. Theatre, Level III.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following theatre courses: Theatre III (one credit), Technical Theatre III (one credit), Theatre Production III (one-half to one credit), International Baccalaureate (IB) Theatre Arts SL, IB Theatre Arts HL (one credit per course). The prerequisite for IB Theatre SL and IB Theatre HL is one credit of any Theatre II course. The prerequisite for all other Level III theatre courses is one credit of Theatre II in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through perceptual studies, students increase their understanding of self and others and develop clear ideas about the world. Through a variety of theatrical experiences, students communicate in a dramatic form, make artistic choices, solve problems, build positive self-concepts, and relate interpersonally.

(2)  Students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions through historical and cultural studies in theatre. Student response and evaluation promote thinking and further discriminating judgment, developing students who are appreciative and evaluative consumers of live theatre, film, television, and other technologies.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment, using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  practice theatre preparation and warm-up techniques effectively;

(B)  employ stage movement and pantomime consistently;

(C)  demonstrate effective voice and diction;

(D)  analyze dramatic structure and genre;

(E)  compare and contrast theatrical conventions of theatre to the conventions of film, television, and electronic media; and

(F)  analyze the interdependence of all theatrical elements.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student interprets characters, using the voice and body expressively, and creates dramatizations. The student is expected to:

(A)  practice appropriate safety measures;

(B)  analyze characters from various genres and styles, describing physical, intellectual, emotional, and social dimensions;

(C)  portray believable characters in improvised and scripted scenes of various styles; and

(D)  improvise and write dialogue that reveals character motivation, advances plot, provides exposition, and reveals theme.

(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student applies design, directing, and theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  construct and operate the technical elements of theatre safely and effectively;

(B)  analyze and evaluate dramatic texts as a basis for technical discussions, considering themes, settings, times, literary styles, genres, and characters;

(C)  cast and direct duet scenes;

(D)  analyze the director's responsibility to the author's intent, script, actors, designers, technicians, and audience;

(E)  analyze the roles of actor, ensemble, and director in production decision making and produce a unified theatrical production; and

(F)  select one or more areas of theatre production for study, demonstrating responsibility, artistic discipline, and creative problem solving.

(4)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student relates theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate historical and cultural influences on theatre;

(B)  analyze the influence of television on American society; and

(C)  define selected theatrical styles and genres.

(5)  Response/evaluation. The student responds to and evaluates theatre and theatrical performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare behavior at various types of performances and practice audience etiquette;

(B)  apply the concepts of evaluation to performances and evaluate theatre, film, television, and electronic media with depth and complexity, using appropriate vocabulary;

(C)  compare communication methods of theatre with that of art, music, and dance and integrate more than one art form in informal and formal performances; and

(D)  make judgments about selected career and avocational opportunities in theatre, film, and television and analyze the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed to pursue them.

Source: The provisions of this 117.66 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


117.67. Theatre, Level IV.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following theatre courses: Theatre Arts IV (one credit), Technical Theatre IV (one credit), Theatre Production IV (one-half to one credit), International Baccalaureate (IB) Theatre Arts SL, IB Theatre Arts HL (one credit per course). The prerequisite for IB Theatre SL and IB Theatre HL is one credit of any Theatre III course. The prerequisite for all other Level IV theatre courses is one credit of Theatre III in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Four basic strands--perception, creative expression/performance, historical and cultural heritage, and critical evaluation--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through perceptual studies, students increase their understanding of self and others and develop clear ideas about the world. Through a variety of theatrical experiences, students communicate in a dramatic form, make artistic choices, solve problems, build positive self-concepts, and relate interpersonally.

(2)  Students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions through historical and cultural studies in theatre. Student response and evaluation promote thinking and further discriminating judgment, developing students who are appreciative and evaluative consumers of live theatre, film, television, and other technologies.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Perception. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment, using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop and practice theatre preparation and warm-up techniques;

(B)  employ stage movement and pantomime consistently;

(C)  develop effective use of voice and diction;

(D)  compare the dramatic structure of theatre, film, television, and electronic media;

(E)  evaluate theatrical conventions of various cultural and historical periods; and

(F)  evaluate the interdependence of all theatrical elements.

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student interprets characters, using the voice and body expressively, and creates dramatizations. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate and apply appropriate safety measures;

(B)  evaluate character dimensions in scripts of various genres and styles;

(C)  create and sustain believable characters; and

(D)  outline and create imaginative scripts and scenarios that include motivated character, unique dialogue, conflict, and resolution for theatre, film, or television.

(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student applies design, directing, and theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  design, construct, and operate appropriate technical elements of theatre, safely and effectively, collaboratively and individually;

(B)  analyze and evaluate dramatic texts and direct brief scenes;

(C)  evaluate the director's responsibility to the author's intent, script, actors, designers, technicians, and audience;

(D)  analyze production plans that include research, rehearsal plans, technical designs, and blocking;

(E)  cast and direct a long scene or a short play, producing a unified theatrical production; and

(F)  conduct concentrated studies in one or more areas of theatre production, demonstrating responsibility, artistic discipline, and creative problem solving.

(4)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student relates theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate historical and cultural influences on theatre;

(B)  evaluate the role of live theatre, film, television, and electronic media in American society; and

(C)  trace historical and cultural developments in theatrical styles and genres.

(5)  Response/evaluation. The student responds to and evaluates theatre and theatrical performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate and practice appropriate audience behavior at various types of performances;

(B)  apply evaluation concepts to performances and compare and contrast literary and dramatic criticism of theatre, film, television, or electronic media;

(C)  compare the nature, components, elements, and communication methods of theatre, music, art, and dance and compare more than one art form in a specific culture or historical period; and

(D)  evaluate career and avocational opportunities in theatre, film, television, and electronic media, justifying choice(s), and analyze the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed to pursue them.

Source: The provisions of this 117.67 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 4943.


For additional information, email rules@tea.state.tx.us.