Chapter 117. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts
Subchapter C. High School, Adopted 2013


Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter C issued under the Texas Education Code, §§7.102(c)(4), 28.002, and 28.025, unless otherwise noted.


§117.301. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts, High School, Adopted 2013.

(a)  The provisions of §§117.301-117.326 of this subchapter shall be implemented by school districts.

(b)  No later than August 31, 2014, the commissioner of education shall determine whether instructional materials funding has been made available to Texas public schools for materials that cover the essential knowledge and skills for fine arts as adopted in §§117.301-117.326 of this subchapter.

(c)  If the commissioner makes the determination that instructional materials funding has been made available under subsection (b) of this section, §§117.301-117.326 of this subchapter shall be implemented beginning with the 2015-2016 school year and apply to the 2015-2016 and subsequent school years.

(d)  If the commissioner does not make the determination that instructional materials funding has been made available under subsection (b) of this section, the commissioner shall determine no later than August 31 of each subsequent school year whether instructional materials funding has been made available. If the commissioner determines that instructional materials funding has been made available, the commissioner shall notify the State Board of Education and school districts that §§117.301-117.326 of this subchapter shall be implemented for the following school year.

(e)  Sections 117.51-117.67 of this chapter shall be superseded by the implementation of §§117.301-117.326 under this section.

Source: The provisions of this §117.301 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.302. Art, Level I (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following art courses: Art I, Art Appreciation, and Art and Media Communications I (one credit per course).

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: observation and perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Each strand is of equal value and may be presented in any order throughout the year. Students rely on personal observations and perceptions, which are developed through increasing visual literacy and sensitivity to surroundings, communities, memories, imaginings, and life experiences as sources for thinking about, planning, and creating original artworks. Students communicate their thoughts and ideas with innovation and creativity. Through art, students challenge their imaginations, foster critical thinking, collaborate with others, and build reflective skills. While exercising meaningful problem-solving skills, students develop the lifelong ability to make informed judgments.

(3)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: observation and perception. The student develops and expands visual literacy skills using critical thinking, imagination, and the senses to observe and explore the world by learning about, understanding, and applying the elements of art, principles of design, and expressive qualities. The student uses what the student sees, knows, and has experienced as sources for examining, understanding, and creating original artwork. The student is expected to:

(A)  consider concepts and ideas from direct observation, original sources, experiences, and imagination for original artwork;

(B)  identify and understand the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork;

(C)  identify and understand the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork; and

(D)  make judgments about the expressive properties such as content, meaning, message, and metaphor of artwork using art vocabulary accurately.

(2)  Creative expression. The student communicates ideas through original artwork using a variety of media with appropriate skills. The student expresses thoughts and ideas creatively while challenging the imagination, fostering reflective thinking, and developing disciplined effort and progressive problem-solving skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  use visual solutions to create original artwork by problem solving through direct observation, original sources, experiences, narrations, and imagination;

(B)  communicate a variety of applications for design solutions;

(C)  use an understanding of copyright and public domain to appropriate imagery constituting the main focal point of original artwork when working from images rather than direct observation or imagination;

(D)  create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions;

(E)  collaborate to create original works of art; and

(F)  demonstrate effective use of art media and tools in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, fiber art, design, and digital art and media.

(3)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture by analyzing artistic styles, historical periods, and a variety of cultures. The student develops global awareness and respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast historical and contemporary styles while identifying general themes and trends;

(B)  describe general characteristics in artwork from a variety of cultures, which might also include personal identity and heritage;

(C)  collaborate on community-based art projects; and

(D)  compare and contrast career and avocational opportunities in art.

(4)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and analyzes the artworks of self and others, contributing to the development of the lifelong skills of making informed judgments and reasoned evaluations. The student is expected to:

(A)  interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in artwork by self, peers, and other artists such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites;

(B)  evaluate and analyze artwork using a verbal or written method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist's intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;

(C)  construct a physical or electronic portfolio by evaluating and analyzing personal original artwork to provide evidence of learning; and

(D)  select and analyze original artwork, portfolios, and exhibitions to form precise conclusions about formal qualities, historical and cultural contexts, intentions, and meanings.

Source: The provisions of this §117.302 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.303. Art, Level II (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following art courses: Art II, Drawing I, Painting I, Printmaking I, Fibers I, Ceramics I, Sculpture I, Jewelry I, Photography I, Design I, Digital Art and Media I, and Art and Media Communications II (one credit per course). The prerequisite for each art course listed in this subsection is one credit of Art, Level I.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: observation and perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Each strand is of equal value and may be presented in any order throughout the year. Students rely on personal observations and perceptions, which are developed through increasing visual literacy and sensitivity to surroundings, communities, memories, imaginings, and life experiences as sources for thinking about, planning, and creating original artworks. Students communicate their thoughts and ideas with innovation and creativity. Through art, students challenge their imaginations, foster critical thinking, collaborate with others, and build reflective skills. While exercising meaningful problem-solving skills, students develop the lifelong ability to make informed judgments.

(3)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: observation and perception. The student develops and expands visual literacy skills using critical thinking, imagination, and the senses to observe and explore the world by learning about, understanding, and applying the elements of art, principles of design, and expressive qualities. The student uses what the student sees, knows, and has experienced as sources for examining, understanding, and creating original artworks. The student is expected to:

(A)  use visual comparisons to illustrate concepts and ideas from direct observation, original sources, experiences, narration, and imagination for original artworks;

(B)  identify and apply the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artworks;

(C)  identify and apply the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity in personal artworks; and

(D)  explore suitability of art media and processes to express specific ideas such as content, meaning, message, appropriation, and metaphor relating to visual themes of artworks using art vocabulary accurately.

(2)  Creative expression. The student communicates ideas through original artworks using a variety of media with appropriate skills. The student expresses thoughts and ideas creatively while challenging the imagination, fostering reflective thinking, and developing disciplined effort and progressive problem-solving skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  create original artwork using multiple solutions from direct observation, original sources, experiences, and imagination in order to expand personal themes that demonstrate artistic intent;

(B)  apply design skills in creating practical applications, clarifying presentations, and examining consumer choices in order to make successful design decisions;

(C)  use an understanding of copyright and public domain to appropriate imagery constituting the main focal point of original artwork when working from images rather than direct observation or imagination;

(D)  create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions;

(E)  collaborate to create original works of art; and

(F)  select from a variety of art media and tools to communicate specific ideas in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, fiber art, jewelry, mixed media, photography, and digital art and media.

(3)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture by analyzing artistic styles, historical periods, and a variety of cultures. The student develops global awareness and respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. The student is expected to:

(A)  examine selected historical periods or styles of art to identify general themes and trends;

(B)  analyze specific characteristics in artwork from a variety of cultures;

(C)  collaborate on community-based art projects; and

(D)  examine and research career, entrepreneurial, and avocational opportunities in art.

(4)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and analyzes the artworks of self and others, contributing to the development of the lifelong skills of making informed judgments and reasoned evaluations. The student is expected to:

(A)  interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in artwork by self, peers, and other artists such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites;

(B)  evaluate and analyze artwork using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist's intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;

(C)  use responses to artwork critiques to make decisions about future directions in personal work;

(D)  construct a physical or electronic portfolio by evaluating and analyzing personal original artworks to provide evidence of learning; and

(E)  select and analyze original artwork, portfolios, and exhibitions to form precise conclusions about formal qualities, historical and cultural contexts, intentions, and meanings.

Source: The provisions of this §117.303 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.304. Art, Level III (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following art courses: Art III, Drawing II, Painting II, Printmaking II, Fibers II, Ceramics II, Sculpture II, Jewelry II, Photography II, Design II, Digital Art and Media II, Advanced Placement (AP) Studio Art: Drawing Portfolio, AP Studio Art: Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP Studio Art: Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP Art History, International Baccalaureate (IB) Visual Arts I Standard Level (SL), or IB Visual Arts I Higher Level (HL) (one credit per course). There are no prerequisites for AP Art History and all IB courses. One credit in an Art, Level II course is a recommended prerequisite for AP Studio Art: Drawing Portfolio, AP Studio Art: Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio, and AP Studio Art: Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio. The prerequisite for all other Art, Level III courses is one credit of Art, Level II in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: observation and perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Each strand is of equal value and may be presented in any order throughout the year. Students rely on personal observations and perceptions, which are developed through increasing visual literacy and sensitivity to surroundings, communities, memories, imaginings, and life experiences as sources for thinking about, planning, and creating original artworks. Students communicate their thoughts and ideas with innovation and creativity. Through art, students challenge their imaginations, foster critical thinking, collaborate with others, and build reflective skills. While exercising meaningful problem-solving skills, students develop the lifelong ability to make informed judgments.

(3)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: observation and perception. The student develops and expands visual literacy skills using critical thinking, imagination, and the senses to observe and explore the world by learning about, understanding, and applying the elements of art, principles of design, and expressive qualities. The student uses what the student sees, knows, and has experienced as sources for examining, understanding, and creating original artwork. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze visual characteristics of sources to illustrate concepts, demonstrate flexibility in solving problems, create multiple solutions, and think imaginatively;

(B)  compare and contrast the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork;

(C)  compare and contrast the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork; and

(D)  explore the suitability of art media and processes and select those appropriate to express specific ideas such as content, meaning, message, and metaphor relating to visual themes to interpret the expressive qualities of artwork.

(2)  Creative expression. The student communicates ideas through original artwork using a variety of media with appropriate skills. The student expresses thoughts and ideas creatively while challenging the imagination, fostering reflective thinking, and developing disciplined effort and progressive problem-solving skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  create original artwork using multiple solutions from direct observation, original sources, experiences, and imagination in order to expand personal themes that demonstrate artistic intent;

(B)  solve visual problems and develop multiple solutions for designing ideas, creating practical applications, clarifying presentations, and evaluating consumer choices in order to make successful design decisions;

(C)  use an understanding of copyright and public domain to appropriate imagery constituting the main focal point of original artwork when working from images rather than direct observation or imagination;

(D)  create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions;

(E)  collaborate to create original works of art; and

(F)  select from a variety of art media and tools to express intent in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, fiber art, design, digital art and media, photography, jewelry, and mixed media.

(3)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture by analyzing artistic styles, historical periods, and a variety of cultures. The student develops global awareness and respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. The student is expected to:

(A)  research selected historical periods, artists, general themes, trends, and styles of art;

(B)  distinguish the correlation between specific characteristics and influences of various cultures and contemporary artwork;

(C)  collaborate on community-based art projects; and

(D)  examine, research, and develop a plan of action for relevant career, entrepreneurial, and avocational art opportunities within a global economy.

(4)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and analyzes the artworks of self and others, contributing to the development of the lifelong skills of making informed judgments and reasoned evaluations. The student is expected to:

(A)  interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in artwork such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites based on evaluation of developmental progress, competency in problem solving, and a variety of visual ideas;

(B)  evaluate and analyze artwork using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist's intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;

(C)  analyze personal artwork in order to create a written response such as an artist's statement reflecting intent, inspiration, the elements of art and principles of design within the artwork, and measure of uniqueness;

(D)  use responses to artwork critiques to make decisions about future directions in personal work;

(E)  construct a physical or electronic portfolio by evaluating and analyzing personal original artwork to provide evidence of learning; and

(F)  select and analyze original artwork, portfolios, and exhibitions to demonstrate innovation and provide examples of in-depth exploration of qualities such as aesthetics; formal, historical, and cultural contexts; intentions; and meanings.

Source: The provisions of this §117.304 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.305. Art, Level IV (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following art courses: Art IV, Drawing III, Painting III, Printmaking III, Fibers III, Ceramics III, Sculpture III, Jewelry III, Photography III, Design III, Digital Art and Media III, Advanced Placement (AP) Studio Art: Drawing Portfolio, AP Studio Art: Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP Studio Art: Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP Art History, International Baccalaureate (IB) Visual Arts II Standard Level (SL), and IB Visual Arts II Higher Level (HL) (one credit per course). There are no prerequisites for AP Art History. The prerequisites for the IB courses listed in this subsection are the corresponding Art, Level II IB courses. One credit in an Art, Level II course is a recommended prerequisite for AP Studio Art: Drawing Portfolio, AP Studio Art: Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio, and AP Studio Art: Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio. The prerequisite for all other Art, Level IV courses is one credit of Art, Level III in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: observation and perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Each strand is of equal value and may be presented in any order throughout the year. Students rely on personal observations and perceptions, which are developed through increasing visual literacy and sensitivity to surroundings, communities, memories, imaginings, and life experiences as sources for thinking about, planning, and creating original artworks. Students communicate their thoughts and ideas with innovation and creativity. Through art, students challenge their imaginations, foster critical thinking, collaborate with others, and build reflective skills. While exercising meaningful problem-solving skills, students develop the lifelong ability to make informed judgments.

(3)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: observation and perception. The student develops and expands visual literacy skills using critical thinking, imagination, and the senses to observe and explore the world by learning about, understanding, and applying the elements of art, principles of design, and expressive qualities. The student uses what the student sees, knows, and has experienced as sources for examining, understanding, and creating original artwork. The student is expected to:

(A)  consider concepts and themes for personal artwork that integrate an extensive range of visual observations, experiences, and imagination;

(B)  compare and contrast the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork;

(C)  compare and contrast the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork; and

(D)  discriminate between art media and processes to express complex visual relationships such as content, meaning, message, and metaphor using extensive art vocabulary.

(2)  Creative expression. The student communicates ideas through original artworks using a variety of media with appropriate skills. The student expresses thoughts and ideas creatively while challenging the imagination, fostering reflective thinking, and developing disciplined effort and progressive problem-solving skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  produce an original body of artwork that integrates information from a variety of sources, including original sources, and demonstrates sustained self-directed investigations into specific themes such as a series or concentration of works;

(B)  evaluate and justify design ideas and concepts to create a body of personal artwork;

(C)  use an understanding of copyright and public domain to appropriate imagery constituting the main focal point of original artwork when working from images rather than direct observation or imagination;

(D)  create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions;

(E)  collaborate to create original works of art; and

(F)  create artwork, singularly and in a series, by selecting from a variety of art materials and tools appropriate to course work in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, fiber art, design, digital art and media, photography, jewelry, and mixed media.

(3)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture by analyzing artistic styles, historical periods, and a variety of cultures. The student develops global awareness and respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. The student is expected to:

(A)  research and report on selected historical periods, artists, general themes, trends, and styles of art;

(B)  analyze and evaluate the influence of contemporary cultures on artwork;

(C)  collaborate on community-based art projects; and

(D)  examine, research, and develop a plan of action for relevant career or entrepreneurial art opportunities within a global economy, justifying the choice.

(4)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and analyzes the artworks of self and others, contributing to the development of the lifelong skills of making informed judgments and reasoned evaluations. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop evaluative criteria to justify artistic decisions in artwork such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites based on a high level of creativity and expertise in one or more art areas;

(B)  evaluate and analyze artwork using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist's intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork;

(C)  analyze personal artwork in order to create a written response such as an artist's statement reflecting intent, inspiration, the elements of art and principles of design within the artwork, and the measure of uniqueness;

(D)  use responses to artwork critiques to make decisions about future directions in personal work;

(E)  construct a physical or electronic portfolio by evaluating and analyzing personal original artwork to provide evidence of learning; and

(F)  evaluate a wide range of artwork to form conclusions about formal qualities, aesthetics, historical and cultural contexts, intents, and meanings.

Source: The provisions of this §117.305 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.306. Dance, Level I (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following dance courses: Principles of Dance I, Ballet I, Modern/Contemporary Dance I, Jazz I, Tap I, World Dance Forms I, Dance Composition/Improvisation I, Dance Theory I, Dance Performance/Ensemble I, Dance and Media Communication I, Dance Production I, and Dance Wellness I (one credit per course). The prerequisite for Dance and Media Communication I is Dance, Middle School 1, 2, or 3.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Dance students develop perceptual thinking and movement abilities in daily life, promoting an understanding of themselves and others. Students develop movement principles and technical skills and explore choreographic and performance qualities. Students develop self-discipline and healthy bodies that move expressively, efficiently, and safely through space and time with a sensitive kinesthetic awareness. Students recognize dance as a vehicle for understanding historical and cultural relevance, increasing an awareness of heritage and traditions of their own and others, and enabling them to participate in a diverse society. Evaluating and analyzing dance allows students to strengthen decision-making skills, develop critical and creative thinking, and develop artistic and creative processes. Students continue to explore technology and its application to dance and movement, enabling them to make informed decisions about dance.

(3)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: perception. The student develops an awareness of the body's movement using sensory information while dancing. The student is expected to:

(A)  define basic kinesthetic and spatial awareness individually and in groups;

(B)  identify a comprehensive understanding of health, safety, and wellness for dancers;

(C)  recognize knowledge of dance genres, styles, and vocabulary; and

(D)  identify images found in the environment through movement.

(2)  Creative expression: artistic process. The student develops knowledge and skills of dance elements, choreographic processes, and forms in a variety of dance genres and styles. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain basic principles of proper body alignment;

(B)  explore, improvise, and demonstrate original movement during the creative process;

(C)  express ideas and emotions through movement; and

(D)  create basic compositional forms using fundamental dance elements for choreographic processes.

(3)  Creative expression: performance. The student demonstrates knowledge and execution of technical dance skills in a variety of dance genres and styles through performing. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform memorized movement sequences with rhythmical accuracy in dance genres and styles such as ballet, modern dance, tap, jazz, musical theatre dance, and world dance forms;

(B)  identify the effective use of dance elements in practice and performance;

(C)  perform basic compositional forms using fundamental choreographic processes; and

(D)  understand the principles of an effective warm-up and cool-down, implementing elements of proper conditioning for performing skills.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform the characteristics of dances from several diverse cultures or historical periods;

(B)  perform dance phrases or dances from several time periods with an understanding of historical and social contexts;

(C)  identify historical figures in dance history and their significance; and

(D)  identify dance in various media and content areas.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student makes informed personal judgments about dance and the meaning and role of dance in society. The student is expected to:

(A)  incorporate appropriate movement vocabulary when identifying qualities and discussing meaning of performance or production in dance;

(B)  demonstrate appropriate audience behavior and etiquette in the classroom and at performances;

(C)  identify relationships between dance and other content areas; and

(D)  identify knowledge and skills of technology in dance.

Source: The provisions of this §117.306 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.307. Dance, Level II (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following dance courses: Principles of Dance II, Ballet II, Modern/Contemporary Dance II, Jazz II, Tap II, World Dance Forms II, Dance Composition/Improvisation II, Dance Theory II, Dance Performance/Ensemble II, Dance Production II, Dance Wellness II, and Dance and Media Communications II (one credit per course). The prerequisite for each Dance, Level II course is one credit of Dance, Level I in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Dance students develop perceptual thinking and movement abilities in daily life, promoting an understanding of themselves and others. Students develop movement principles and technical skills and explore choreographic and performance qualities. Students develop self-discipline and healthy bodies that move expressively, efficiently, and safely through space and time with a sensitive kinesthetic awareness. Students recognize dance as a vehicle for understanding historical and cultural relevance, increasing an awareness of heritage and traditions of their own and others, and enabling them to participate in a diverse society. Evaluating and analyzing dance allows students to strengthen decision-making skills, develop critical and creative thinking, and develop artistic and creative processes. Students will continue to explore technology and its application to dance and movement, enabling them to make informed decisions about dance.

(3)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: perception. The student develops an awareness of the body's movement using sensory information while dancing. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate kinesthetic and spatial awareness individually and in groups;

(B)  expand a comprehensive understanding of health, safety, and wellness for dancers;

(C)  demonstrate effective knowledge of dance genres, styles, and vocabulary; and

(D)  interpret details in movement in natural and constructed environments.

(2)  Creative expression: artistic process. The student develops knowledge and skills of dance elements, choreographic processes, and forms in a variety of dance genres and styles. The student is expected to:

(A)  expand a comprehensive understanding of principles of proper body alignment;

(B)  explore, improvise, and perform original movement during the creative process;

(C)  expand the expression of ideas and emotions through movement; and

(D)  create enhanced compositional forms using fundamental dance elements for choreographic processes.

(3)  Creative expression: performance. The student demonstrates knowledge and execution of technical dance skills in a variety of dance genres and styles through performing. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform extended movement patterns with rhythmical accuracy in dance genres and styles such as ballet, modern dance, tap, jazz, musical theatre dance, and world dance forms;

(B)  demonstrate the elements of dance effectively;

(C)  perform enhanced compositional forms using sound choreographic processes; and

(D)  implement an effective warm-up and cool-down, implementing the elements of proper conditioning for performing skills.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze dances of various cultures or historical periods;

(B)  choreograph short dance phrases that exhibit an understanding of various historical periods and social contexts;

(C)  perform dances in various media and content areas; and

(D)  interpret historical and cultural dance forms using technology.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student makes informed personal judgments about dance and the meaning and role of dance in society. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify characteristics of a variety of dances;

(B)  analyze qualities of performance and proper etiquette in dance;

(C)  identify similarities of form and expression in dance and other content areas; and

(D)  apply knowledge and skills of technology in dance.

Source: The provisions of this §117.307 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.308. Dance, Level III (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following dance courses: Principles of Dance III, Ballet III, Modern/Contemporary Dance III, Jazz III, Tap III, World Dance Forms III, Dance Composition/Improvisation III, Dance Theory III, Dance Performance/Ensemble III, Dance Production III, Dance Wellness III, Dance History I, and International Baccalaureate (IB) Dance I (one credit per course). The prerequisite for each Dance, Level III course is one credit of Dance, Level II in the corresponding discipline, excluding Dance History I and IB Dance I courses.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Dance students develop perceptual thinking and movement abilities in daily life, promoting an understanding of themselves and others. Students develop movement principles and technical skills and explore choreographic and performance qualities. Students develop self-discipline and healthy bodies that move expressively, efficiently, and safely through space and time with a sensitive kinesthetic awareness. Students recognize dance as a vehicle for understanding historical and cultural relevance, increasing an awareness of heritage and traditions of their own and others, and enabling them to participate in a diverse society. Evaluating and analyzing dance allows students to strengthen decision-making skills, develop critical and creative thinking, and develop artistic and creative processes. Students continue to explore technology and its application to dance and movement, enabling them to make informed decisions about dance.

(3)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: perception. The student develops an awareness of the body's movement using sensory information while dancing. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze kinesthetic and spatial awareness individually and in groups;

(B)  distinguish a comprehensive understanding of health, safety, and wellness for dancers;

(C)  compare knowledge and skills of dance genres, styles, and vocabulary; and

(D)  differentiate designs and images in natural and constructed environments.

(2)  Creative expression: artistic process. The student develops knowledge and skills of dance elements, choreographic processes, and forms in a variety of dance genres and styles. The student is expected to:

(A)  create dance studies using original movement based on theme and variation;

(B)  experiment, improvise, and perform original movement during the creative process;

(C)  compare and contrast the expression of ideas and emotions through movement; and

(D)  differentiate compositional forms using intermediate dance elements for choreographic processes.

(3)  Creative expression: performance. The student demonstrates knowledge and execution of technical dance skills in a variety of dance genres and styles through performing. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform and examine memorized complex movement sequences with rhythmical accuracy in dance genres and styles such as ballet, modern dance, tap, jazz, musical theatre dance, and world dance forms;

(B)  execute a wide range of dynamics in quality movement;

(C)  perform with projection, confidence, and expression when executing dance movements; and

(D)  distinguish an effective warm-up and cool-down, implementing the elements of proper conditioning for performing skills.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare similarities and differences in steps, styles, and traditions from various cultures or historical periods;

(B)  recognize and evaluate dances as they relate to various historical periods and social contexts;

(C)  create and experiment with dances in various media and content areas; and

(D)  research historical and cultural dance forms using technology.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student makes informed personal judgments about dance and the meaning and role of dance in society. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare characteristics and qualities of a variety of dances;

(B)  analyze dance from a variety of perspectives such as those of dance critic, performer, choreographer, and audience member;

(C)  understand the relationship of dance performance skills and other content areas; and

(D)  experiment with knowledge and skills of technology through a dance portfolio.

Source: The provisions of this §117.308 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.309. Dance, Level IV (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following dance courses: Principles of Dance IV, Ballet IV, Modern/Contemporary Dance IV, Jazz IV, Tap IV, World Dance Forms IV, Dance Composition/Improvisation IV, Dance Theory IV, Dance Performance/Ensemble IV, Dance Production IV, Dance Wellness IV, Dance History II, and International Baccalaureate (IB) Dance II (one credit per course). The prerequisite for each Dance, Level IV course is one credit of Dance, Level III in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Dance students develop perceptual thinking and movement abilities in daily life, promoting an understanding of themselves and others. Students develop movement principles and technical skills and explore choreographic and performance qualities. Students develop self-discipline and healthy bodies that move expressively, efficiently, and safely through space and time with a sensitive kinesthetic awareness. Students recognize dance as a vehicle for understanding historical and cultural relevance, increasing an awareness of heritage and traditions of their own and others, and enabling them to participate in a diverse society. Evaluating and analyzing dance allows students to strengthen decision-making skills, develop critical and creative thinking, and develop artistic and creative processes. Students continue to explore technology and its application to dance and movement, enabling them to make informed decisions about dance.

(3)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: perception. The student develops an awareness of the body's movement using sensory information while dancing. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate kinesthetic and spatial awareness individually and in groups;

(B)  develop a working knowledge of health, safety, and wellness for dancers;

(C)  demonstrate and evaluate a working knowledge and skills of dance genres, styles, and vocabulary; and

(D)  create designs and images found in natural and constructed environments.

(2)  Creative expression: artistic process. The student develops knowledge and skills of dance elements, choreographic processes, and forms in a variety of dance genres and styles. The student is expected to:

(A)  create and improvise dance studies using original movement based on theme and variation to successfully communicate an idea;

(B)  improvise, construct, and evaluate original movement studies;

(C)  evaluate the expression of ideas and emotions through movement; and

(D)  design compositional forms implementing advanced dance elements for choreographic processes.

(3)  Creative expression: performance. The student demonstrates knowledge and execution of technical dance skills in a variety of dance genres and styles through performing. The student is expected to:

(A)  assess performance of memorized complex movement sequences with rhythmical accuracy in dance genres and styles such as ballet, modern dance, tap, jazz, musical theatre dance, and world dance forms;

(B)  perform dance movements with a refined sense of musicality and expressiveness and a wide range of spatial qualities;

(C)  evaluate the performance of projection, confidence, and expression in the movement; and

(D)  design an effective warm-up and cool-down, implementing the elements of proper conditioning for performing skills.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate choreography in dances from various cultures or historical periods;

(B)  research and create a project using technology to illustrate an understanding of significant dance events or historical figures in appropriate social, historical, and cultural contexts;

(C)  improvise and construct dances in various media and content areas; and

(D)  evaluate historical and cultural dance forms using technology.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student makes informed personal judgments about dance and the meaning and role of dance in society. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate personal dance compositions and the work of others;

(B)  create and reconstruct a choreographic study using varied media and environments;

(C)  create a portfolio based on personal artistic works, performance works, or research; and

(D)  perform and evaluate a choreographic study using varied media and environments.

Source: The provisions of this §117.309 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.310. Music, Level I (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following music courses: Band I, Choir I, Orchestra I, Jazz Ensemble I, Jazz Improvisation I, Instrumental Ensemble I, Vocal Ensemble I, World Music Ensemble I, Applied Music I, Mariachi I, Piano I, Guitar I, and Harp I (one credit per course).

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: music literacy; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. The foundation of music literacy is fostered through reading, writing, reproducing, and creating music, thus developing a student's intellect. Through creative expression, students apply their music literacy and the critical-thinking skills of music to sing, play, read, write, and/or move. By experiencing musical periods and styles, students will understand the relevance of music to history, culture, and the world, including the relationship of music to other academic disciplines and the vocational possibilities offered. Through critical listening, students analyze, evaluate, and respond to music, developing criteria for making critical judgments and informed choices.

(3)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: music literacy. The student describes and analyzes music and musical sounds. The student develops organizational skills, engages in problem solving, and explores the properties and capabilities of various musical idioms. The student is expected to:

(A)  experience and explore exemplary musical examples using technology and available live performances;

(B)  identify and describe melodic and harmonic parts when listening to and performing music using a melodic reading system such as solfège, numbers, letter names, note names, or scale degrees;

(C)  define concepts of music notation, intervals, and chord structure using appropriate terminology;

(D)  define concepts of rhythm and meter using appropriate terminology and counting system;

(E)  explore elements of music such as rhythm, meter, melody, harmony, key, expression markings, texture, form, dynamics, and timbre through literature selected for performance; and

(F)  apply health and wellness concepts related to music practice such as body mechanics, hearing protection, vocal health, hydration, and appropriate hygienic practices.

(2)  Foundations: music literacy. The student reads and writes music notation using an appropriate notation system. The student is expected to:

(A)  read and notate music that incorporates rhythmic patterns in simple, compound, and asymmetric meters; and

(B)  interpret music symbols and expressive terms referring to dynamics, tempo, and articulation.

(3)  Creative expression. The student demonstrates musical artistry by singing or playing an instrument individually and in groups. The student performs music in a variety of genres at an appropriate level of difficulty. The student performs from notation and by memory as appropriate. The student develops cognitive and psychomotor skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate mature, characteristic sound appropriate for the genre;

(B)  demonstrate psychomotor and kinesthetic skills such as appropriate posture, breathing, text, diction, articulation, vibrato, bowings, fingerings, phrasing, independent manual dexterities, and percussion techniques;

(C)  demonstrate rhythmic accuracy using appropriate tempo;

(D)  demonstrate observance of key signature and modalities;

(E)  demonstrate correct intonation, appropriate phrasing, and appropriate dynamics; and

(F)  create and notate or record original musical phrases.

(4)  Creative expression. The student sight reads, individually and in groups, by singing or playing an instrument. The student reads from notation at an appropriate level of difficulty in a variety of styles. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate mature, characteristic sound appropriate for the genre while sight reading;

(B)  demonstrate psychomotor and kinesthetic skills such as use of appropriate posture, breathing, text, diction, articulation, vibrato, bowings, fingerings, phrasing, independent manual dexterities, and percussion techniques while sight reading;

(C)  demonstrate rhythmic accuracy while sight reading using a counting system within an appropriate tempo;

(D)  demonstrate observance of key signature and modalities while sight reading;

(E)  demonstrate use of a melodic reading system such as solfège, numbers, letter names, note names, or scale degrees while sight reading; and

(F)  demonstrate correct intonation, appropriate phrasing, and appropriate dynamics while sight reading.

(5)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates music to history, culture, and the world. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast music by genre, style, culture, and historical period;

(B)  identify music-related vocations and avocations;

(C)  identify and describe the uses of music in societies and cultures;

(D)  identify and explore the relationship between music and other academic disciplines;

(E)  identify and explore the impact of technologies, ethical issues, and economic factors on music, performers, and performances; and

(F)  identify and explore tools for college and career preparation such as social media applications, repertoire lists, auditions, and interview techniques.

(6)  Critical evaluation and response. The student listens to, responds to, and evaluates music and musical performance in both formal and informal settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  practice informed concert etiquette as a performer and as an audience member during live and recorded performances in a variety of settings;

(B)  design and apply criteria for making informed judgments regarding the quality and effectiveness of musical performances;

(C)  develop processes for self-evaluation and select tools for personal artistic improvement; and

(D)  evaluate musical performances by comparing them to exemplary models.

Source: The provisions of this §117.310 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.311. Music, Level II (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following music courses: Band II, Choir II, Orchestra II, Jazz Ensemble II, Jazz Improvisation II, Instrumental Ensemble II, Vocal Ensemble II, World Music Ensemble II, Applied Music II, Mariachi II, Piano II, Guitar II, and Harp II (one credit per course). The prerequisite for each Music, Level II course is one credit of Music, Level I in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: music literacy; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. The foundation of music literacy is fostered through reading, writing, reproducing, and creating music, thus developing a student's intellect. Through creative expression, students apply their music literacy and the critical-thinking skills of music to sing, play, read, write, and/or move. By experiencing musical periods and styles, students will understand the relevance of music to history, culture, and the world, including the relationship of music to other academic disciplines and the vocational possibilities offered. Through critical listening, students analyze, evaluate, and respond to music, developing criteria for making critical judgments and informed choices.

(3)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: music literacy. The student describes and analyzes music and musical sounds. The student develops organizational skills, engages in problem solving, and explores the properties and capabilities of various musical idioms. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast exemplary musical examples using technology and available live performances;

(B)  compare and contrast melodic and harmonic parts using a melodic reading system such as solfège, numbers, letter names, note names, or scale degrees;

(C)  compare and contrast concepts of music notation, intervals, and chord structure using appropriate terminology;

(D)  compare and contrast concepts of rhythm and meter using appropriate terminology and counting system;

(E)  compare and contrast musical forms such as song, binary, ternary, and rondo selected for performance and listening;

(F)  compare and contrast concepts of balance and blend using appropriate terminology;

(G)  compare and contrast concepts of music such as rhythm, meter, melody, harmony, key, expression markings, dynamics, and timbre; and

(H)  apply health and wellness concepts related to music practice such as body mechanics, hearing protection, vocal health, hydration, and appropriate hygienic practices.

(2)  Foundations: music literacy. The student reads and notates music using an appropriate notation system. The student is expected to:

(A)  read and notate music that incorporates rhythmic patterns in simple, compound, and asymmetric meters; and

(B)  interpret music symbols and expressive terms referring to dynamics, tempo, and articulation.

(3)  Creative expression. The student demonstrates musical artistry by singing or playing an instrument individually and in groups. The student performs music in a variety of genres at an increasing level of difficulty. The student performs from notation and by memory as appropriate. The student develops cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate increasingly mature, characteristic sound appropriate for the genre;

(B)  refine and apply psychomotor and kinesthetic skills such as appropriate posture, breathing, text, diction, articulation, vibrato, bowings, fingerings, phrasing, independent manual dexterities, and percussion techniques;

(C)  demonstrate rhythmic accuracy using appropriate tempo;

(D)  demonstrate observance of key signatures and modalities;

(E)  demonstrate correct intonation, appropriate phrasing, and appropriate dynamics; and

(F)  create and notate or record original musical phrases at an appropriate level of difficulty.

(4)  Creative expression. The student sight reads, individually and in groups, by singing or playing an instrument. The student reads from notation at an increasing level of difficulty in a variety of styles. The student is expected to:

(A)  exhibit increasingly mature, characteristic sound appropriate for the genre while sight reading;

(B)  demonstrate, refine, and apply psychomotor and kinesthetic skills such as appropriate posture, breathing, text, diction, articulation, vibrato, bowings, fingerings, phrasing, independent manual dexterities, and percussion techniques while sight reading;

(C)  demonstrate correct articulation and rhythmic accuracy while sight reading using a counting system within an appropriate tempo;

(D)  demonstrate observance of multiple key signatures and changing modalities while sight reading;

(E)  demonstrate use of a melodic reading system such as solfège, numbers, letter names, note names, or scale degrees while sight reading;

(F)  demonstrate application of dynamics and phrasing while sight reading; and

(G)  demonstrate accurate intonation while sight reading using concepts such as vowel shapes, ensemble blend, and just intonation.

(5)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates music to history, culture, and the world. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast music by genre, style, culture, and historical period;

(B)  define uses of music in societies and cultures;

(C)  identify and explore the relationships between music and other academic disciplines;

(D)  identify music-related vocations and avocations;

(E)  identify and explore the impact of technologies, ethical issues, and economic factors on music, musicians, and performances; and

(F)  identify and explore tools for college and career preparation such as personal performance recordings, social media applications, repertoire lists, auditions, and interview techniques.

(6)  Critical evaluation and response. The student listens to, responds to, and evaluates music and musical performance in formal and informal settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  exhibit informed concert etiquette as a performer and as an audience member during live and recorded performances in a variety of settings;

(B)  design and apply criteria for making informed judgments regarding the quality and effectiveness of musical performances;

(C)  develop processes for self-evaluation and select tools for personal artistic improvement; and

(D)  evaluate musical performances by comparing them to exemplary models.

Source: The provisions of this §117.311 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.312. Music, Level III (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following music courses: Band III, Choir III, Orchestra III, Jazz Ensemble III, Jazz Improvisation III, Instrumental Ensemble III, Vocal Ensemble III, World Music Ensemble III, Applied Music III, Mariachi III, Piano III, Guitar III, and Harp III (one credit per course). The prerequisite for all Music, Level III music courses is one credit of Music, Level II in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: music literacy; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. The foundation of music literacy is fostered through reading, writing, reproducing, and creating music, thus developing a student's intellect. Through creative expression, students apply their music literacy and the critical-thinking skills of music to sing, play, read, write, and/or move. By experiencing musical periods and styles, students will understand the relevance of music to history, culture, and the world, including the relationship of music to other academic disciplines and the vocational possibilities offered. Through critical listening, students analyze, evaluate, and respond to music, developing criteria for making critical judgments and informed choices.

(3)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: music literacy. The student describes and analyzes music and musical sounds. The student develops organizational skills, engages in problem solving, and explores the properties and capabilities of various musical idioms. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate exemplary musical examples using technology and available live performances;

(B)  explore musical textures such as monophony, homophony, and polyphony while using a melodic reading system;

(C)  compare and contrast concepts of music notation, intervals, and chord structure using appropriate terminology;

(D)  compare and contrast concepts of rhythm and meter using appropriate terminology and counting system;

(E)  compare and contrast musical forms such as song, binary, ternary, rondo, and sonata-allegro selected for performance and listening;

(F)  compare and contrast concepts of balance and blend using appropriate terminology;

(G)  compare and contrast musical styles and genres such as cantata, opera, zydeco, motet, hip-hop, symphony, anthem, march, beats, musical theatre, gospel jazz, and spirituals;

(H)  compare and contrast concepts of music such as rhythm, meter, melody, harmony, texture, key, expression markings, dynamics, and timbre using literature selected for performance; and

(I)  apply health and wellness concepts related to music practice such as body mechanics, hearing protection, vocal health, hydration, and appropriate hygienic practices.

(2)  Foundations: music literacy. The student reads and notates music using an appropriate notation system. The student is expected to:

(A)  read and notate music that incorporates melody and rhythm; and

(B)  interpret music symbols and expressive terms referring to style, dynamics, tempo, and articulation.

(3)  Creative expression. The student demonstrates musical artistry by singing or playing an instrument individually and in groups. The student performs music in a variety of genres at an increasing level of difficulty. The student performs from notation and by memory as appropriate. The student develops cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate mature, characteristic sound appropriate for the genre;

(B)  refine and apply psychomotor and kinesthetic skills such as appropriate posture, breathing, text, diction, articulation, vibrato, bowings, fingerings, phrasing, independent manual dexterities, and percussion techniques;

(C)  demonstrate rhythmic accuracy using appropriate tempo;

(D)  demonstrate observance of key signatures and modalities;

(E)  demonstrate correct intonation, appropriate phrasing, and appropriate dynamics; and

(F)  create and notate or record original musical phrases at an appropriate level of difficulty.

(4)  Creative expression. The student sight reads, individually and in groups, by singing or playing an instrument. The student reads from notation at an increasing level of difficulty in a variety of styles. The student is expected to:

(A)  exhibit mature, characteristic sound appropriate for the genre while sight reading;

(B)  refine and apply psychomotor and kinesthetic skills such as appropriate posture, breathing, text, diction, articulation, vibrato, bowings, fingerings, phrasing, independent manual dexterities, and percussion techniques while sight reading;

(C)  demonstrate correct articulation and rhythmic accuracy while sight reading using a counting system within an appropriate tempo;

(D)  demonstrate observance of multiple key signatures and changing modalities while sight reading;

(E)  demonstrate use of a melodic reading system such as solfège, numbers, letter names, note names, or scale degrees while sight reading;

(F)  demonstrate application of dynamics and phrasing while sight reading; and

(G)  demonstrate accurate intonation while sight reading using concepts such as vowel shapes, ensemble blend, and just intonation.

(5)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates music to history, culture, and the world. The student is expected to:

(A)  classify representative examples of music by genre, style, culture, and historical period;

(B)  explore the relevance of music to societies and cultures;

(C)  define the relationships between music content and concepts and other academic disciplines;

(D)  analyze music-related career options;

(E)  analyze and evaluate the impact of technologies, ethical issues, and economic factors on music, performers, and performances; and

(F)  generate tools for college and career preparation such as electronic portfolios, personal resource lists, performance recordings, social media applications, repertoire lists, auditions, and interview techniques.

(6)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and evaluates written music and musical performance in formal and informal settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  exhibit informed concert etiquette as a performer and an audience member during live and recorded performances in a variety of settings;

(B)  create and apply specific criteria for evaluating performances of various musical styles;

(C)  create and apply specific criteria for offering constructive feedback using a variety of music performances;

(D)  develop processes for self-evaluation and select tools for personal artistic improvement such as critical listening and individual and group performance recordings; and

(E)  evaluate musical performances by comparing them to similar or exemplary models and offering constructive suggestions for improvement.

Source: The provisions of this §117.312 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.313. Music, Level IV (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following music courses: Band IV, Choir IV, Orchestra IV, Jazz Ensemble IV, Jazz Improvisation IV, Instrumental Ensemble IV, Vocal Ensemble IV, World Music Ensemble IV, Applied Music IV, Mariachi IV, Piano IV, Guitar IV, and Harp IV (one credit per course). The prerequisite for all Music, Level IV courses is one credit of Music, Level III in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: music literacy; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. The foundation of music literacy is fostered through reading, writing, reproducing, and creating music, thus developing a student's intellect. Through creative expression, students apply their music literacy and the critical-thinking skills of music to sing, play, read, write, and/or move. By experiencing musical periods and styles, students will understand the relevance of music to history, culture, and the world, including the relationship of music to other academic disciplines and the vocational possibilities offered. Through critical listening, students analyze, evaluate, and respond to music, developing criteria for making critical judgments and informed choices.

(3)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: music literacy. The student describes and analyzes music and musical sounds. The student develops organizational skills, engages in problem solving, and explores the properties and capabilities of various musical idioms. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate exemplary musical examples using technology and available live performances;

(B)  analyze advanced musical textures while using a melodic reading system;

(C)  analyze concepts of music notation, intervals, and chord structure using appropriate terminology;

(D)  analyze concepts of rhythm and meter using appropriate terminology and counting system;

(E)  analyze musical forms in music selected for performance and listening;

(F)  analyze concepts of balance and blend using appropriate terminology;

(G)  analyze musical styles and genres such as cantata, opera, zydeco, motet, hip-hop, symphony, anthem, march, beats, musical theatre, gospel jazz, and spirituals;

(H)  analyze concepts of music such as rhythm, meter, melody, harmony, texture, key, expression markings, dynamics, and timbre using literature selected for performance; and

(I)  analyze and apply health and wellness concepts related to music practice such as body mechanics, repetitive motion injury prevention, first-aid training, hearing protection, vocal health, hydration, and appropriate hygienic practices.

(2)  Foundations: music literacy. The student reads and notates music using an appropriate notation system. The student is expected to:

(A)  read and notate music that incorporates advanced melodies and rhythms; and

(B)  interpret music symbols and expressive terms.

(3)  Creative expression. The student demonstrates musical artistry by singing or playing an instrument individually and in groups. The student performs music in a variety of genres at an increasing level of difficulty. The student performs from notation and by memory as appropriate. The student develops cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate mature, characteristic sound appropriate for the genre;

(B)  analyze and apply psychomotor and kinesthetic skills such as appropriate posture, breathing, text, diction, articulation, vibrato, bowings, fingerings, phrasing, independent manual dexterities, and percussion techniques;

(C)  demonstrate rhythmic accuracy using complex patterns at an appropriate tempo;

(D)  demonstrate observance of key signatures and modalities;

(E)  demonstrate correct intonation, appropriate phrasing, and appropriate dynamics; and

(F)  create and notate or record original musical phrases at an increasing level of difficulty.

(4)  Creative expression. The student sight reads, individually and in groups, by singing or playing an instrument. The student reads from notation at an increasing level of difficulty in a variety of styles. The student is expected to:

(A)  exhibit mature, characteristic sound appropriate for the genre while sight reading;

(B)  refine and apply psychomotor and kinesthetic skills such as appropriate posture, breathing, text, diction, articulation, vibrato, bowings, fingerings, phrasing, independent manual dexterities, and percussion techniques while sight reading;

(C)  demonstrate correct articulation and rhythmic accuracy while sight reading using a counting system within an appropriate tempo;

(D)  demonstrate observance of multiple key signatures and changing modalities while sight reading;

(E)  demonstrate use of a melodic reading system such as solfège, numbers, letter names, note names, or scale degrees while sight reading;

(F)  demonstrate application of dynamics and phrasing while sight reading; and

(G)  demonstrate accurate intonation while sight reading using concepts such as vowel shapes, ensemble blend, and just intonation.

(5)  Historical cultural relevance. The student relates music to history, culture, and the world. The student is expected to:

(A)  discriminate representative examples of music by genre, style, culture, and historical period;

(B)  evaluate the relevance of music to societies and cultures;

(C)  define the relationships between music content and concepts and other academic disciplines;

(D)  explain a variety of music and music-related career options;

(E)  analyze and evaluate the impact of technologies, ethical issues, and economic factors on music, performers, and performances; and

(F)  generate tools for college and career preparation such as curricula vitae, electronic portfolios, personal resource lists, performance recordings, social media applications, repertoire lists, and audition and interview techniques.

(6)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and evaluates written music and musical performance in formal and informal settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  exhibit informed concert etiquette as a performer and an audience member during live and recorded performances in a variety of settings;

(B)  create and apply specific criteria for evaluating performances of various musical styles;

(C)  create and apply specific criteria for offering constructive feedback using a variety of musical performances;

(D)  develop processes for self-evaluation and select tools for personal artistic improvement; and

(E)  evaluate musical performances and compositions by comparing them to similar or exemplary models and offering constructive suggestions for improvement.

Source: The provisions of this §117.313 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.314. Music Studies (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following music courses: Music Theory I-II; Music Appreciation I-II; Music Business I-II; Music Composition I-II; Music Production I-II; Music and Media Communications I-II; College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Music Theory; International Baccalaureate (IB) Music, Standard Level (SL); and IB Music, Higher Level (HL). There are no prerequisites for Music Study Level I courses; however, the prerequisite for IB Music, SL and IB Music, HL is one credit of any Music, Level II course. Students may take Music Studies with different course content for a maximum of three credits.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: music literacy; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. The foundation of music literacy is fostered through reading, writing, reproducing, and creating music, thus developing a student's intellect. Through creative expression, students apply their music literacy and the critical-thinking skills of music to read, write, create, and/or move. By experiencing musical periods and styles, students will understand the relevance of music to history, culture, and the world, including the relationship of music to other academic disciplines and the vocational possibilities offered. Through critical listening, students analyze, evaluate, and respond to music, developing criteria for making critical judgments and informed choices.

(3)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: music literacy. The student describes and analyzes music and musical sounds. The student develops organizational skills, engages in problem solving, and explores the properties and capabilities of various musical idioms. The student is expected to:

(A)  experience and explore exemplary musical examples using technology and available live performances;

(B)  identify and describe melodic and harmonic parts when listening to and performing music using a melodic reading system such as solfège, numbers, letter names, note names, or scale degrees;

(C)  define concepts of music notation, intervals, and chord structure using appropriate terminology;

(D)  define concepts of rhythm and meter using appropriate terminology and counting system;

(E)  explore elements of music such as rhythm, meter, melody, harmony, key, expression markings, texture, form, dynamics, and timbre through literature selected for performance; and

(F)  apply health and wellness concepts related to music practice such as body mechanics, hearing protection, vocal health, hydration, and appropriate hygienic practices.

(2)  Foundations: music literacy. The student reads and notates music using an appropriate notation system. The student is expected to:

(A)  read notation systems or manipulate sounds as appropriate to the course of study;

(B)  read and notate or record and produce music that incorporates rhythmic patterns in simple, compound, and asymmetric meters as appropriate;

(C)  interpret music symbols and expressive terms referring to concepts such as dynamics, tempo, and articulation as appropriate;

(D)  demonstrate cognitive skills, including observance of key signature and modalities, while studying or producing music at an appropriate level of difficulty; and

(E)  demonstrate music-making skills such as appropriate use of technology in recording, notating, editing, manipulating, arranging, Standard Motion Picture Time Encryption (SMPT), and emergent technologies.

(3)  Creative expression. The student, individually and in groups, makes music of an appropriate level of difficulty in a variety of genres from notation, recording, or by memory as appropriate. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate, create, or apply characteristic sounds appropriate for the genre;

(B)  create, examine, or perform a repertoire of music representing a variety of styles, including those from diverse cultures;

(C)  demonstrate understanding of correct articulation and rhythmic accuracy;

(D)  demonstrate understanding of correct dynamics and phrasing;

(E)  demonstrate understanding of correct intonation; and

(F)  exhibit and explain appropriate performance techniques for formal and informal concerts or recording sessions.

(4)  Creative expression. The student creates original music within specified guidelines. The student is expected to:

(A)  create original musical phrases; and

(B)  notate or record original musical phrases.

(5)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates music to history, culture, and the world. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast music by genre, style, culture, and historical period;

(B)  identify music-related vocations and avocations;

(C)  identify and describe the uses of music in societies and cultures;

(D)  identify and explore the relationship between music and other academic disciplines;

(E)  identify and explore the impact of technologies, ethical issues, and economic factors on music, musicians, and performances; and

(F)  identify and explore tools for college and career preparation such as social media applications, repertoire lists, and audition and interview techniques.

(6)  Critical evaluation and response. The student listens to, responds to, and evaluates music and musical performance in formal and informal settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  practice informed concert etiquette as a performer and an audience member during live and recorded performances in a variety of settings;

(B)  design and apply criteria for making informed judgments regarding the quality and effectiveness of musical performances;

(C)  develop processes for self-evaluation and select tools for personal artistic improvement such as critical listening and individual and group performance recordings; and

(D)  evaluate musical performances by comparing them to exemplary models.

Source: The provisions of this §117.314 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.315. Theatre, Level I, Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following theatre courses: Theatre Arts I, Theatre and Media Communications I (one credit per course), and Theatre Production I (one-half to one credit).

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: inquiry and understanding; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through the foundations: inquiry and understanding strand, students develop a perception of self, human relationships, and the world using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. Through the creative expression strand, students communicate in a dramatic form, engage in artistic thinking, build positive self-concepts, relate interpersonally and integrate knowledge with other content areas in a relevant manner. Through the historical and cultural relevance strand, students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions in theatre and the diversity of world cultures as expressed in theatre. Through the critical evaluation and response strand, students engage in inquiry and dialogue, accept constructive criticism, revise personal views to promote creative and critical thinking, and develop the ability to appreciate and evaluate live theatre.

(3)  Through diverse forms of storytelling and production, students will exercise and develop creativity, intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem solving, and collaborative skills. Participation and evaluation in a variety of theatrical experiences will afford students opportunities to develop an understanding of self and their role in the world.

(4)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: inquiry and understanding. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  understand the value and purpose of using listening, observation, concentration, cooperation, and emotional and sensory recall;

(B)  develop and practice theatre preparation and warm-up techniques;

(C)  develop and practice stage movement techniques such as mime, pantomime, stage combat, Laban, Lecoq, or Viewpoints consistently to express thoughts, feelings, and actions non-verbally;

(D)  develop and practice effective voice and diction to express thoughts and feelings;

(E)  analyze characters by describing attributes such as physical, intellectual, emotional, and social dimensions through reading scripts of published plays;

(F)  demonstrate a working knowledge of the language of theatre such as stage terminology, elements of theatre, or theatrical conventions;

(G)  analyze and describe the interdependence of all theatrical elements;

(H)  define the roles of and appreciate the collaborative relationships between all artistic partners such as playwrights, composers, directors, actors, designers, technicians, and audience;

(I)  identify and practice memorization skills;

(J)  identify the principles of improvisation; and

(K)  identify and recognize the importance of safe theatre practices.

(2)  Creative expression: performance. The student interprets characters using the voice and body expressively and creates dramatizations. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate safe use of the voice and body;

(B)  define creativity as it relates to personal expression;

(C)  employ effective voice and diction to express thoughts and feelings;

(D)  use physical, intellectual, emotional, and social awareness to portray believable characters and convey a story when applying acting concepts, skills, and techniques;

(E)  employ physical techniques consistently to express thoughts, feelings, and actions non-verbally; and

(F)  create, write, and refine original monologues, improvisations, scenes, or vignettes that reflect dramatic structure to convey meaning to the audience through live performance or media forms.

(3)  Creative expression: production. The student applies design, directing, and theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop and practice technical theatre skills;

(B)  apply technical knowledge and skills safely to create or operate theatrical elements such as scenery, properties, lighting, sound, costumes, makeup, current technology, or publicity;

(C)  perform a role such as actor, director, designer, technician, or editor in production decision making and collaborate with others in a production role to tell a story through live theatre or media performance; and

(D)  demonstrate responsibility, artistic discipline, and creative problem solving by concentrating in one or more areas of theatre production such as acting, technical theatre, or theatre management.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  portray theatre as a reflection of life in particular times, places, and cultures;

(B)  relate historical and cultural influences on theatre;

(C)  identify the impact of live theatre, film, television, and electronic media on contemporary society;

(D)  appreciate the cultural heritages of world drama and theatre and identify key figures, works, and trends in dramatic literature;

(E)  appreciate the multicultural heritage of United States drama and theatre and identify key figures, works, and trends in dramatic literature; and

(F)  identify and appreciate the innovations and contributions of the United States to the performing arts such as theatre, melodrama, musical theatre, radio, film, television, technology, or electronic media.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and evaluates theatre and theatrical performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze and apply appropriate behavior at various types of live performances;

(B)  recognize theatre as an art form and evaluate self as a creative being;

(C)  offer and receive constructive criticism of peer performances;

(D)  evaluate live theatre in written and oral form with precise and specific observations using appropriate evaluative theatre vocabulary such as intent, structure, effectiveness, and value;

(E)  evaluate film, television, or other media in written or oral form with precise and specific observations using appropriate evaluative theatre vocabulary such as intent, structure, effectiveness, and value;

(F)  explore career and avocational opportunities such as theatre education, arts administration, performance, design, management, and playwriting in theatre or media and evaluate the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed to pursue such opportunities;

(G)  use technology such as electronic portfolios, research projects, and journals to document and present information in a clear and coherent manner; and

(H)  connect theatre skills and experiences to higher education and careers outside of the theatre.

Source: The provisions of this §117.315 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.316. Theatre, Level II, Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following theatre courses: Theatre Arts II, Theatre and Media Communications II (one credit per course), and Theatre Production II (one-half to one credit). The prerequisite for each Theatre, Level II course is one credit of Theatre, Level I in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: inquiry and understanding; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through the foundations: inquiry and understanding strand, students develop a perception of self, human relationships, and the world using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. Through the creative expression strand, students communicate in a dramatic form, engage in artistic thinking, build positive self-concepts, relate interpersonally, and integrate knowledge with other content areas in a relevant manner. Through the historical and cultural relevance strand, students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions in theatre and the diversity of world cultures as expressed in theatre. Through the critical evaluation and response strand, students engage in inquiry and dialogue, accept constructive criticism, revise personal views to promote creative and critical thinking, and develop the ability to appreciate and evaluate live theatre.

(3)  Through diverse forms of storytelling and production, students will exercise and develop creativity, intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem solving, and collaborative skills. Participation and evaluation in a variety of theatrical experiences will afford students opportunities to develop an understanding of self and their role in the world.

(4)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: inquiry and understanding. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop and practice theatre warm-up techniques;

(B)  develop and practice stage movement techniques consistently to express thoughts, feelings, and actions non-verbally;

(C)  demonstrate effective voice and diction;

(D)  analyze dramatic structure and genre;

(E)  identify examples of theatrical conventions in theatre, film, television, and electronic media;

(F)  relate the interdependence of all theatrical elements; and

(G)  develop and practice memorization skills.

(2)  Creative expression: performance. The student interprets characters using the voice and body expressively and creates dramatizations. The student is expected to:

(A)  model safe, appropriate techniques to allow for physical, vocal, and emotional expression;

(B)  explore creativity as it relates to self and ensemble;

(C)  demonstrate effective voice and diction to express thoughts and feelings;

(D)  apply physical, intellectual, emotional, and social interactions to portray believable characters and convey a story when applying acting concepts, skills, and techniques;

(E)  develop physical techniques consistently to express thoughts, feelings, and actions non-verbally; and

(F)  create, write, devise, and refine original monologues, improvisations, scenes, or vignettes to convey meaning to the audience through live performance or media forms.

(3)  Creative expression: production. The student applies design, directing, and theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop and practice safe and effective stagecraft skills;

(B)  read and analyze cultural, social, and political aspects of a script to determine technical elements;

(C)  analyze characters, themes, duties, and elements of a script to determine artistic roles and technical assignments;

(D)  perform a role such as actor, director, designer, technician, or editor in production decision making and collaborate with others to tell a story through live theatre or media performance; and

(E)  develop responsibility, artistic discipline, and creative problem solving by concentrating in one or more areas of theatre production such as acting, technical theatre, or theatre management.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze historical and cultural influences on theatre;

(B)  analyze ways in which theatre, television, and film play a role in our daily lives and influence our values and behaviors;

(C)  analyze and evaluate the impact of live theatre, film, television, and electronic media in contemporary society;

(D)  research the influences of world drama and theatre and identify key figures, works, and trends in dramatic literature;

(E)  research the influences of the multicultural heritage of drama and theatre in the United States and identify key figures, works, and trends in dramatic literature; and

(F)  identify and appreciate the innovations and contributions of the United States to the performing arts such as theatre, melodrama, musical theatre, radio, film, television, technology, or electronic media.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and evaluates theatre and theatrical performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate and apply appropriate audience etiquette at various types of performances;

(B)  analyze theatre as an art form and evaluate self as a creative being;

(C)  offer and receive constructive criticism of peer performances;

(D)  evaluate the treatment of artistic elements such as theme, character, setting, and action in theatre, musical theatre, dance, art, music, or other media and integrate more than one art form in informal presentations;

(E)  examine career and avocational opportunities such as theatre education, arts administration, performance, design, management, and playwriting in theatre or other media and evaluate the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed to pursue such opportunities;

(F)  use technology such as portfolios, research projects, and journals to document and present information in a clear and coherent manner; and

(G)  connect theatre skills and experiences to higher education and careers outside of the theatre.

Source: The provisions of this §117.316 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.317. Theatre, Level III, Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following theatre courses: Theatre III (one credit), Theatre Production III (one-half to one credit), Playwriting I, Directing I, International Baccalaureate (IB) Theatre, Standard Level (SL), and IB Theatre, Higher Level (HL) (one credit per course). The prerequisite for IB Theatre SL and IB Theatre HL is one credit of any Theatre, Level II course. The prerequisite for all other Theatre, Level III courses is one credit of Theatre, Level II in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: inquiry and understanding; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through the foundations: inquiry and understanding strand, students develop a perception of self, human relationships, and the world using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. Through the creative expression strand, students communicate in a dramatic form, engage in artistic thinking, build positive self-concepts, relate interpersonally, and integrate knowledge with other content areas in a relevant manner. Through the historical and cultural relevance strand, students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions in theatre and the diversity of world cultures as expressed in theatre. Through the critical evaluation and response strand, students engage in inquiry and dialogue, accept constructive criticism, revise personal views to promote creative and critical thinking, and develop the ability to appreciate and evaluate live theatre.

(3)  Through diverse forms of storytelling and production, students will exercise and develop creativity, intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem solving, and collaborative skills. Participation and evaluation in a variety of theatrical experiences will afford students opportunities to develop an understanding of self and their role in the world.

(4)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: inquiry and understanding. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply theatre preparation and warm-up techniques effectively;

(B)  experiment with stage movement;

(C)  distinguish the proper techniques such as diction, inflection, and projection in the use of voice;

(D)  analyze and evaluate dramatic structure and genre;

(E)  distinguish between the theatrical conventions of theatre, film, television, and other media;

(F)  evaluate the interdependence of all theatrical elements; and

(G)  develop and practice memorization skills.

(2)  Creative expression: performance. The student interprets characters using the voice and body expressively and creates dramatizations. The student is expected to:

(A)  employ safe, appropriate techniques to allow for physical, vocal, and emotional expression;

(B)  analyze creativity as it relates to self and ensemble and its effect on audience;

(C)  analyze characters from various genres and styles, describing physical, intellectual, emotional, and social dimensions;

(D)  experiment with improvisation and scripted scenes of various styles to portray believable characters;

(E)  write dialogue that reveals character motivation, advances plot, provides exposition, and reveals theme; and

(F)  integrate two or more art or media forms in a performance.

(3)  Creative expression: production. The student applies design, directing, and theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  experiment with technical elements of theatre safely and effectively in improvisation or scripted scenes or plays;

(B)  analyze and evaluate dramatic texts as a basis for technical discussions, considering themes, settings, times, literary styles, genres, and characters;

(C)  cast and direct duet scenes;

(D)  perform a role such as actor, director, designer, technician, or editor in production decision making and collaborate with others to tell a story through live theatre or media performance; and

(E)  perform the role of actor, director, or technician, demonstrating responsibility, artistic discipline, and creative problem solving.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate historical and cultural influences on theatre;

(B)  analyze ways in which theatre, television, and film play a role in our daily lives and influence our values and behaviors;

(C)  employ and evaluate the impact of live theatre, film, television, and other media in contemporary society;

(D)  research the influences of world drama and theatre and identify key figures, works, and trends in dramatic literature;

(E)  research the influences of the multicultural heritage of drama and theatre in the United States and identify key figures, works, and trends in dramatic literature; and

(F)  identify and appreciate the innovations and contributions of the United States to the performing arts such as theatre, melodrama, musical theatre, radio, film, television, technology, or electronic media.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and evaluates theatre and theatrical performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare behavior at various types of performances and practice appropriate audience etiquette;

(B)  recognize theatre as an art form and evaluate self as a creative being;

(C)  apply the concepts of evaluation to performances and evaluate theatre, film, television, and other media with depth and complexity using appropriate vocabulary;

(D)  compare communication methods of theatre with those of art, music, dance, and other media;

(E)  make judgments about selected career and avocational opportunities such as theatre education, arts administration, performance, design, management, and playwriting in theatre, film, television, and other media and analyze the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed to pursue such opportunities;

(F)  use technology such as portfolios, research projects, and journals to document and present information in a clear and coherent manner;

(G)  relate theatre skills and experiences to higher education and careers outside of the theatre; and

(H)  create a personal resume or portfolio of theatrical experience.

Source: The provisions of this §117.317 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.318. Theatre, Level IV, Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following theatre courses: Theatre Arts IV (one credit), Theatre Production IV (one-half to one credit), Playwriting II, Directing II, International Baccalaureate (IB) Theatre, Standard Level (SL), and IB Theatre, Higher Level (HL) (one credit per course). The prerequisite for IB Theatre SL and IB Theatre HL is one credit of any Theatre, Level III course. The prerequisite for all other Theatre, Level IV courses is one credit of Theatre, Level III in the corresponding discipline.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: inquiry and understanding; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through the foundations: inquiry and understanding strand, students develop a perception of self, human relationships, and the world using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. Through the creative expression strand, students communicate in a dramatic form, engage in artistic thinking, build positive self-concepts, relate interpersonally, and integrate knowledge with other content areas in a relevant manner. Through the historical and cultural relevance strand, students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions in theatre and the diversity of world cultures as expressed in theatre. Through the critical evaluation and response strand, students engage in inquiry and dialogue, accept constructive criticism, revise personal views to promote creative and critical thinking, and develop the ability to appreciate and evaluate live theatre.

(3)  Through diverse forms of storytelling and production, students will exercise and develop creativity, intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem solving, and collaborative skills. Participation and evaluation in a variety of theatrical experiences will afford students opportunities to develop an understanding of self and their role in the world.

(4)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: inquiry and understanding. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  create and demonstrate theatre preparation and warm-up techniques;

(B)  devise and model stage movement;

(C)  model proper techniques such as diction, inflection, and projection in the use of effective voice;

(D)  compare the structure of theatre to that of film, television, and other media;

(E)  evaluate theatrical conventions of various cultural and historical periods;

(F)  evaluate the interdependence of all theatrical elements; and

(G)  develop and model memorization skills.

(2)  Creative expression: performance. The student interprets characters using the voice and body expressively and creates dramatizations. The student is expected to:

(A)  model safe, appropriate techniques to allow for physical, vocal, and emotional expression;

(B)  demonstrate creativity as it relates to self and ensemble and its effect on audience;

(C)  analyze and interpret characters from various genres and styles, describing physical, intellectual, emotional, and social dimensions;

(D)  interpret scripted scenes of various styles to portray believable characters; and

(E)  create individually or devise collaboratively imaginative scripts and scenarios.

(3)  Creative expression: production. The student applies design, directing, and theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  experiment with the technical elements of theatre safely and effectively in improvisation or scripted scenes or plays;

(B)  analyze and evaluate dramatic texts and direct brief scenes;

(C)  demonstrate understanding of a director's responsibility to the author's intent, script, actors, designers, technicians, and audience;

(D)  analyze production plans that include research, rehearsal plans, technical designs, and blocking;

(E)  demonstrate leadership by casting and directing a long scene or a short play, producing a unified theatrical production; and

(F)  apply expertise in one or more areas of theatre production, demonstrating responsibility, artistic discipline, and creative problem solving.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate historical and cultural influences on theatre;

(B)  analyze ways in which theatre, television, and film play a role in our daily lives and influence our values and behaviors;

(C)  employ and evaluate the impact of live theatre, film, television, and other media in contemporary society;

(D)  research the influences of world drama and theatre and identify key figures, works, and trends in dramatic literature;

(E)  research the influences of the multicultural heritage of drama and theatre in the United States and identify key figures, works, and trends in dramatic literature; and

(F)  identify and appreciate the innovations and contributions of the United States to the performing arts such as theatre, melodrama, musical theatre, radio, film, television, technology or electronic media.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and evaluates theatre and theatrical performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate and practice appropriate audience behavior at various types of performances;

(B)  defend theatre as an art form and value self as a creative being;

(C)  apply evaluation concepts to performances, and compare and contrast literary and dramatic criticism of theatre, film, television, or other media;

(D)  compare and contrast the elements and communication methods of theatre, film, music, art, dance, or other media in a specific culture or historical period;

(E)  evaluate selected career and avocational opportunities such as theatre education, arts administration, performance, design, management, playwriting, and dramatic criticism in theatre, film, television, and other media and analyze the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed to pursue such opportunities;

(F)  employ technology such as portfolios, research projects, and journals to communicate and present findings in a clear and coherent manner;

(G)  appraise personal theatre skills and experiences to opportunities in higher education and careers outside of the theatre; and

(H)  create a personal resume or portfolio of theatrical experience.

Source: The provisions of this §117.318 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.319. Musical Theatre, Level I (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing Musical Theatre, Level I (one credit). Prerequisite suggested in two of the following disciplines: theatre, dance, or music or by audition.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: inquiry and understanding; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through the foundations: inquiry and understanding strand, students develop a perception of self, human relationships, and the world using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. Through the creative expression strand, students communicate in a dramatic form, engage in artistic thinking, build positive self-concepts, relate interpersonally, and integrate knowledge with other content areas in a relevant manner. Through the historical and cultural relevance strand, students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions in theatre and the diversity of world cultures as expressed in theatre. Through the critical evaluation and response strand, students engage in inquiry and dialogue, accept constructive criticism, revise personal views to promote creative and critical thinking, and develop the ability to appreciate and evaluate live theatre.

(3)  Musical Theatre will expose students to a wide range of on-stage performance disciplines, including acting performance, vocal performance, and dance performance. The course will also provide an atmosphere in which students benefit from a teaching and learning experience in these performance disciplines of musical theatre. Students will receive comprehensive and rigorous instruction so that they may make informed choices about the craft, college, and the profession. The course will enhance and cultivate the creative gifts of each student while encouraging a sense of self-confidence. The course will enable students to study and perform the varied styles of musical theatre with special attention to the principles of stage movement, stage vocal technique, stage choreography, acting, characterization, and other aspects of a musical production.

(4)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: inquiry and understanding. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment using elements of drama, dance, music, and the conventions of musical theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop and practice theatrical, dance, and vocal music preparation and warm-up techniques;

(B)  recognize stage movement, pantomime, and dance skills in various genres such as ballet, tap, jazz, ballroom, and Broadway;

(C)  identify acting techniques in song, dance, and spoken dialogue;

(D)  recognize the professional audition process;

(E)  compare the dramatic structure of musical theatre to musical film and musical television productions;

(F)  define and give examples of the language of musical theatre such as stage terminology, elements of musical theatre, or theatrical conventions; and

(G)  describe the interdependence of all theatrical elements.

(2)  Creative expression: performance. The student interprets characters through acting, singing, and dance using voice and body expressively and creates dramatizations called for in a musical script. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify appropriate safety measures in vocalization, dance movement, and theatrical movement;

(B)  define creativity as it relates to personal expression in musical theatre;

(C)  recognize characterization in musical theatre and scripts of various genres and styles;

(D)  identify proper voice usage and correct vocal production skills such as vocal placement, vocal phrasing, vocal tone production, and vocal consistency in a performance situation; and

(E)  interpret lyrics for characterization, vocalization, and dance.

(3)  Creative expression: production. The student applies design, directing, choreography, and musical theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  recognize safe and effective use of technical elements of musical theatre;

(B)  identify the responsibilities of the director, musical director, and choreographer to the composer and librettist's intent;

(C)  recognize musical production plans such as rehearsal plans, technical designs, blocking, choreography, and solo and ensemble musical numbers; and

(D)  perform a role and collaborate with others to tell a story through live musical theatre or media performance.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates musical theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  study historical and cultural influences on musical theatre;

(B)  identify the historical development of musical theatre as a uniquely American art form;

(C)  identify historical and cultural developments in musical theatre;

(D)  identify the contemporary development of musical theatre as an international art form such as new composers and their composition styles, multicultural influences, practices and principles of contemporary musical theatre, advances in the creation of contemporary or popular musical theatre, and impact of musical theatre on the world's economic and performing arts scene;

(E)  appreciate musical theatre as a reflection of life in particular times, places, and cultures; and

(F)  recognize the influences of musical theatre forms such as theatre, television, and film on past and present society.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and evaluates musical theatre performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze and apply appropriate audience behavior at various types of performances;

(B)  recognize musical theatre as an art form and evaluate self as a creative being;

(C)  offer and receive constructive criticism of peer performances;

(D)  evaluate musical theatre in written and oral form with precise and specific observations on intent, structure, effectiveness, and value using appropriate evaluative theatre vocabulary;

(E)  explore career and avocational opportunities in musical theatre, musical film, and musical television, justifying choice(s) and analyze the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed for success;

(F)  connect musical theatre skills and experiences to higher education and careers outside of the theatre; and

(G)  recognize the value of presenting information in a clear and coherent manner using technology in a resume or portfolio format.

Source: The provisions of this §117.319 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.320. Musical Theatre, Level II (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing Musical Theatre, Level II (one credit). A suggested prerequisite is Musical Theatre, Level I or by audition.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: inquiry and understanding; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through the foundations: inquiry and understanding strand, students develop a perception of self, human relationships, and the world using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. Through the creative expression strand, students communicate in a dramatic form, engage in artistic thinking, build positive self-concepts, relate interpersonally, and integrate knowledge with other content areas in a relevant manner. Through the historical and cultural relevance strand, students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions in theatre and the diversity of world cultures as expressed in theatre. Through the critical evaluation and response strand, students engage in inquiry and dialogue, accept constructive criticism, revise personal views to promote creative and critical thinking, and develop the ability to appreciate and evaluate live theatre.

(3)  Musical Theatre will expose students to a wide range of on-stage performance disciplines, including acting performance, vocal performance, and dance performance. The course will also provide an atmosphere in which students benefit from a teaching and learning experience in these performance disciplines of musical theatre. Students will receive comprehensive and rigorous instruction so that they may make informed choices about the craft, college, and the profession. The course will enhance and cultivate the creative gifts of each student while encouraging a sense of self-confidence. The course will enable students to study and perform the varied styles of musical theatre with special attention to the principles of stage movement, stage vocal technique, stage choreography, acting, characterization, and other aspects of a musical production.

(4)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: inquiry and understanding. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment using elements of drama, dance, music, and the conventions of musical theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop and practice theatrical, dance, and vocal music preparation and warm-up techniques;

(B)  develop stage movement, pantomime, and dance skills in various genres such as ballet, tap, jazz, ballroom, and Broadway;

(C)  develop acting techniques in song, dance, and spoken dialogue;

(D)  develop professional audition techniques such as musical selections, monologue performance, dance and movement, and the relationship between accompanist and performer;

(E)  analyze the dramatic structure of musical theatre;

(F)  employ the language of musical theatre such as stage terminology, elements of musical theatre, or theatrical conventions;

(G)  analyze a character from a libretto, describing physical, intellectual, emotional, and social dimensions; and

(H)  collaborate with all artistic partners such as playwrights, composers, directors, musical directors, choreographers, actors, designers, technicians, and audience.

(2)  Creative expression: performance. The student interprets characters through acting, singing, and dance using voice and body expressively and creates dramatizations called for in a musical script. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply appropriate safety measures in vocalization, dance movement, and theatrical movement;

(B)  explore creativity as it relates to self and ensemble in musical theatre;

(C)  analyze characterization in musical theatre styles;

(D)  apply proper voice usage and correct vocal production skills such as vocal placement, vocal phrasing, vocal tone production, and vocal consistency in a performance situation;

(E)  analyze lyrics for characterization, vocalization, and dance;

(F)  create and sustain believable characters through characterization, vocalization, and dance; and

(G)  compose material related to musical theatre such as monologues, scenes, lyrics, or choreography to convey meaning to the audience through live performance or other media forms.

(3)  Creative expression: production. The student applies design, directing, choreography, and musical theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply safe and effective use of technical elements of musical theatre;

(B)  analyze the responsibilities of the director, musical director, and choreographer to the composer and librettist's intent;

(C)  analyze musical production plans such as research, rehearsal plans, technical designs, blocking, choreography, and solo and ensemble musical numbers;

(D)  demonstrate responsibility and creative problem solving in one or more areas of musical theatre production such as acting, technical theatre, and theatre management; and

(E)  collaborate with others to perform a role such as actor, director, designer, technician, and editor in a musical theatre or musical media production.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates musical theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze historical and cultural influences on musical theatre;

(B)  investigate the historical development of musical theatre as a uniquely American art form;

(C)  investigate historical and cultural developments in musical theatre;

(D)  investigate the contemporary development of musical theatre such as new composers and their composition styles, multicultural influences, practices and principles of contemporary musical theatre, advances in the creation of contemporary or popular musical theatre, and impact of musical theatre on the world's economic and performing arts scene as an international art form;

(E)  depict musical theatre as a reflection of life in particular times, places, and cultures; and

(F)  relate the influences of musical theatre forms such as theatre, television, and film on past and present society.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and evaluates musical theatre performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate and practice appropriate audience behavior at various types of performances;

(B)  describe musical theatre as an art form and evaluate self as a creative being;

(C)  appraise self and peer performance with constructive criticism;

(D)  evaluate musical theatre in written and oral form with precise and specific observations on intent, structure, effectiveness, and value using appropriate evaluative theatre vocabulary;

(E)  evaluate the interdependence of all musical theatre elements such as dramatic spoken text, vocalized text, dance, costuming, set design, lighting, and sound;

(F)  evaluate career and avocational opportunities in musical theatre, musical film, and musical television, justifying choice(s), and analyze the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed for success;

(G)  relate musical theatre skills and experiences to higher education and careers outside of the theatre; and

(H)  document and present information in a clear and coherent manner using technology in a resume or portfolio format.

Source: The provisions of this §117.320 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.321. Musical Theatre, Level III (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing Musical Theatre, Level III (one credit). A suggested prerequisite is Musical Theatre, Level II or by audition.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: inquiry and understanding; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through the foundations: inquiry and understanding strand, students develop a perception of self, human relationships, and the world using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. Through the creative expression strand, students communicate in a dramatic form, engage in artistic thinking, build positive self-concepts, relate interpersonally, and integrate knowledge with other content areas in a relevant manner. Through the historical and cultural relevance strand, students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions in theatre and the diversity of world cultures as expressed in theatre. Through the critical evaluation and response strand, students engage in inquiry and dialogue, accept constructive criticism, revise personal views to promote creative and critical thinking, and develop the ability to appreciate and evaluate live theatre.

(3)  Musical Theatre will expose students to a wide range of on-stage performance disciplines, including acting performance, vocal performance, and dance performance. The course will also provide an atmosphere in which students benefit from a teaching and learning experience in these performance disciplines of musical theatre. Students will receive comprehensive and rigorous instruction so that they may make informed choices about the craft, college, and the profession. The course will enhance and cultivate the creative gifts of each student while encouraging a sense of self-confidence. The course will enable students to study and perform the varied styles of musical theatre with special attention to the principles of stage movement, stage vocal technique, stage choreography, acting, characterization, and other aspects of a musical production.

(4)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: inquiry and understanding. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment using elements of drama, dance, music, and the conventions of musical theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  create theatrical, dance, and vocal music preparation and warm-up techniques;

(B)  develop stage movement, pantomime, and dance skills in various genres such as ballet, tap, jazz, ballroom, and Broadway;

(C)  develop acting techniques in song, dance, and spoken dialogue;

(D)  model professional audition techniques such as musical selection, monologue performance, dance and movement, and the relationship between accompanist and performer;

(E)  analyze the dramatic structure of musical theatre;

(F)  perform a character from a musical incorporating physical, intellectual, and emotional dimensions;

(G)  collaborate effectively with all artistic partners in a musical theatre production; and

(H)  employ the language of musical theatre such as stage terminology, elements of musical theatre, or theatrical conventions.

(2)  Creative expression: performance. The student interprets characters through acting, singing, and dance using voice and body expressively and creates dramatizations called for in a musical script. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply appropriate safety measures in vocalization, dance movement, and theatrical movement;

(B)  appraise creativity as it relates to self and ensemble in musical theatre;

(C)  create and sustain believable characters through acting, singing, and dancing;

(D)  model proper voice usage and correct vocal production skills such as vocal placement, vocal phrasing, vocal tone production, and vocal consistency in a performance situation;

(E)  analyze lyrics of a song as a monologue, dialogue, or ensemble scene for interpretation, characterization, vocalization, and dance; and

(F)  collaborate to produce material related to musical theatre such as monologues, scenes, lyrics, or choreography to convey meaning to the audience through live performance or other media forms.

(3)  Creative expression: production. The student applies design, directing, choreography, and musical theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  model safe and effective use of technical elements of musical theatre;

(B)  create musical production plans such as rehearsal plans, technical designs, blocking, choreography, and solo and ensemble musical numbers;

(C)  demonstrate responsibility and creative problem solving as a leader in one or more areas of musical theatre or musical media production such as actor, director, choreographer, and musical director; and

(D)  collaborate with others to perform a role such as actor, director, choreographer, designer, technician, and editor in a musical theatre or musical media production.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates musical theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  articulate historical and cultural influences and developments on musical theatre;

(B)  examine the historical development of musical theatre as a uniquely American art form;

(C)  experiment with contemporary forms of musical theatre such as new composers and their composition styles, multicultural styles, practices and principles of contemporary musical theatre, and popular musical theatre;

(D)  defend musical theatre as a reflection of life in particular times, places, and cultures; and

(E)  articulate the influences of musical theatre forms such as theatre, television, and film on past and present society.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and evaluates musical theatre performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  model appropriate audience behavior at various types of performances;

(B)  defend musical theatre as a creative art form and evaluate self as a creative being;

(C)  evaluate the interdependence of all musical theatre elements such as dramatic spoken text, vocalized text, dance, costuming, set design, lighting, and sound;

(D)  evaluate self and peer performance using constructive criticism;

(E)  discuss musical theatre, musical film, or other musical media using precise musical theatre vocabulary;

(F)  experiment with a career opportunity in musical theatre, musical film, or other musical media and analyze the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed for personal success;

(G)  relate musical theatre skills and experiences to higher education and careers outside of the theatre; and

(H)  document and present information in a clear and coherent manner using technology in a resume or portfolio format.

Source: The provisions of this §117.321 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.322. Musical Theatre, Level IV (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing Musical Theatre, Level IV (one credit). A suggested prerequisite is Musical Theatre, Level III or by audition.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: inquiry and understanding; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through the foundations: inquiry and understanding strand, students develop a perception of self, human relationships, and the world using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. Through the creative expression strand, students communicate in a dramatic form, engage in artistic thinking, build positive self-concepts, relate interpersonally, and integrate knowledge with other content areas in a relevant manner. Through the historical and cultural relevance strand, students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions in theatre and the diversity of world cultures as expressed in theatre. Through the critical evaluation and response strand, students engage in inquiry and dialogue, accept constructive criticism, revise personal views to promote creative and critical thinking, and develop the ability to appreciate and evaluate live theatre.

(3)  Musical Theatre will expose students to a wide range of on-stage performance disciplines, including acting performance, vocal performance, and dance performance. The course will also provide an atmosphere in which students benefit from a teaching and learning experience in these performance disciplines of musical theatre. Students will receive comprehensive and rigorous instruction so that they may make informed choices about the craft, college, and the profession. The course will enhance and cultivate the creative gifts of each student while encouraging a sense of self-confidence. The course will enable students to study and perform the varied styles of musical theatre with special attention to the principles of stage movement, stage vocal technique, stage choreography, acting, characterization, and other aspects of a musical production.

(4)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: inquiry and understanding. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment using elements of drama, dance, music, and the conventions of musical theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  create and lead theatrical, dance, and vocal music preparation and warm-up techniques;

(B)  arrange stage movement in a musical theatre performance;

(C)  choreograph various dance genres such as ballet, tap, jazz, ballroom, and Broadway in a musical theatre performance;

(D)  develop effective use of voice and diction in spoken dialogue to effectively express thoughts, feelings, and actions;

(E)  develop appropriate singing technique in vocalized solo and ensemble repertoire to effectively express thoughts, feelings, and actions;

(F)  model professional audition techniques such as musical selection, monologue performance, dance and movement, and the relationship between accompanist and performer;

(G)  perform a multi-dimensional character from a musical incorporating singing, dancing, and acting; and

(H)  collaborate effectively with all artistic partners in a musical theatre production.

(2)  Creative expression: performance. The student interprets characters through acting, singing, and dance using voice and body expressively and creates dramatizations called for in a musical script. The student is expected to:

(A)  model appropriate safety measures in vocalization, dance movement, and theatrical movement;

(B)  defend creativity as it relates to self and ensemble in musical theatre;

(C)  analyze characterization in musical theatre styles;

(D)  model proper voice usage and correct vocal production skills such as vocal placement, vocal phrasing, vocal tone production, and vocal consistency in a performance situation;

(E)  analyze lyrics of a song as a monologue, dialogue, or ensemble scene for interpretation, characterization, and physicalization;

(F)  create and sustain believable characters through acting, singing, and dancing; and

(G)  collaborate to produce material related to musical theatre such as monologues, scenes, lyrics, or choreography to convey meaning to the audience through live performance or other media forms.

(3)  Creative expression: production. The student applies design, directing, choreography, and musical theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  model safe and effective use of technical elements of musical theatre;

(B)  create musical production plans such as research, rehearsal plans, technical designs, blocking, choreography, and solo and ensemble musical numbers; and

(C)  cast and direct a musical theatre or musical media production.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates musical theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  conduct concentrated studies on historical and cultural influences on and developments in musical theatre;

(B)  justify musical theatre as an original American art form;

(C)  depict musical theatre as a reflection of life in particular times, places, and cultures; and

(D)  defend the influences of musical theatre forms such as theatre, television, and film on past and present society.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and evaluates musical theatre performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate and practice appropriate audience behavior at various types of performances;

(B)  defend musical theatre as a creative art form;

(C)  compare the nature of musical theatre elements to other musical media;

(D)  appraise self and peer performance using constructive criticism;

(E)  evaluate musical theatre, musical film, or other musical media using precise musical theatre vocabulary;

(F)  experiment with a career opportunity in musical theatre, musical film, or other musical media and analyze the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed for personal success;

(G)  relate musical theatre skills and experiences to higher education and careers outside of the theatre; and

(H)  document and present information in a clear and coherent manner using technology to build a resume or portfolio.

Source: The provisions of this §117.322 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.323. Technical Theatre, Level I (One Credit), Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing Technical Theatre, Level I.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: inquiry and understanding; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through the foundations: inquiry and understanding strand, students develop a perception of self, human relationships, and the world using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. Through the creative expression strand, students communicate in a dramatic form, engage in artistic thinking, build positive self-concepts, relate interpersonally, and integrate knowledge with other content areas in a relevant manner. Through the historical and cultural relevance strand, students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions in theatre and the diversity of world cultures as expressed in theatre. Through the critical evaluation and response strand, students engage in inquiry and dialogue, accept constructive criticism, revise personal views to promote creative and critical thinking, and develop the ability to appreciate and evaluate live theatre.

(3)  Through a variety of experiences with diverse forms of storytelling and production, Technical Theatre I will afford students the opportunity to develop and exercise creativity, intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem solving, and collaborative skills. Participation and evaluation in a variety of theatrical experiences will afford students opportunities to develop an understanding of self and their role in the world.

(4)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: inquiry and understanding. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  define standard vocabulary in costumes, lights, makeup, theatre management, properties, scenery, and sound;

(B)  recognize the technical elements of theatre such as types of stages, stage areas, fly systems, curtains, front of house, dressing rooms, and storage;

(C)  recognize theatre systems such as the production calendar, tech rehearsals, and production staff roles;

(D)  recognize safe theatre practices such as personal safety, fire safety, tool safety, shop safety, and handling emergencies in the theatre; and

(E)  read scripts and apply basic script analysis techniques to technical theatre elements.

(2)  Creative expression: performance. The student develops and demonstrates technical theatre skills through the pre-production processes from concept (script or original idea) to performance. The student is expected to:

(A)  recognize the function of technical elements in various theatrical styles and genres;

(B)  recognize the design process of analysis, research, incubation/selection, implementation, and evaluation to a theatrical product such as a rendering, model, and sketch;

(C)  identify the production team such as designers, director, crew members, playwright, and stage manager and their duties;

(D)  articulate the importance of collaboration and leadership skills;

(E)  define creativity as it relates to personal expression in technical theatre and design;

(F)  recognize communication methods between directors and designers such as prompt book, costume plot, light plot, makeup, theatre management, property list, design renderings, and models; and

(G)  apply the basic skills of measurement in construction.

(3)  Creative expression: production. The student applies design, directing, and theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the safe use of tools and materials in scenery and property construction;

(B)  identify the safe use of lighting equipment such as instruments, dimmers, and controllers;

(C)  identify the safe use of the basic techniques of costume construction and make-up application;

(D)  identify the safe use of sound equipment; and

(E)  recognize the roles of theatre management such as house management and stage management.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  conduct research to establish historical and cultural accuracy in theatrical design;

(B)  identify the impact of live theatre, film, television, and electronic media on contemporary society;

(C)  understand the cultural heritage of world drama and theatre and identify key figures, works, and trends in dramatic literature; and

(D)  identify and understand the innovations and contributions of the United States to the performing arts such as theatre, melodrama, musical theatre, radio, film, television, technology, or electronic media.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and evaluates theatre and theatrical performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  understand the use of resumes and portfolios in technical theatre;

(B)  recognize appropriate behavior at various types of live performances;

(C)  recognize the design and technical elements of theatre as an art form and evaluate self as a creative being;

(D)  evaluate live theatre in written and oral form with precise and specific observations of technical elements using appropriate vocabulary;

(E)  evaluate film, television, or other media in written or oral form with precise and specific observations of technical elements using appropriate vocabulary;

(F)  connect theatre skills and experiences to higher education and careers; and

(G)  use technology to communicate and present findings in a clear and coherent manner.

Source: The provisions of this §117.323 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.324. Technical Theatre, Level II, Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following theatre courses: Technical Theatre, Level II (one credit), Lighting and Sound (one-half to one credit), Stagecraft, Costume Construction (one-half to one credit), Makeup for the Theatre (one-half to one credit), Design for the Theatre (one-half to one credit), and Theatre Management (one-half to one credit). Technical Theatre, Level I is suggested as a prerequisite for Technical Theatre, Level II courses.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: inquiry and understanding; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through the foundations: inquiry and understanding strand, students develop a perception of self, human relationships, and the world using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. Through the creative expression strand, students communicate in a dramatic form, engage in artistic thinking, build positive self-concepts, relate interpersonally, and integrate knowledge with other content areas in a relevant manner. Through the historical and cultural relevance strand, students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions in theatre and the diversity of world cultures as expressed in theatre. Through the critical evaluation and response strand, students engage in inquiry and dialogue, accept constructive criticism, revise personal views to promote creative and critical thinking, and develop the ability to appreciate and evaluate live theatre.

(3)  Through a variety of experiences with technical theatre, Technical Theatre II will afford students the opportunity to continue to study and develop their knowledge of technical theatre arts on a more challenging level. Students explore and apply a myriad of technical theatre concepts and skills. Students will exercise and develop creativity, intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem solving, and collaborative skills. Participation and evaluation in a variety of theatrical experiences will afford students opportunities to develop an understanding of self and their role in the world.

(4)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: inquiry and understanding. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the world using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate proper use of standard vocabulary in costumes, lights, makeup, theatre management, properties, scenery, and sound;

(B)  identify the technical elements of theatre such as types of stages, stage areas, fly systems, curtains, front of house, dressing rooms, and storage;

(C)  use established theatre systems such as the production calendar, tech rehearsals, and production staff roles;

(D)  use safe theatre practices such as personal safety, fire safety, tool safety, shop safety, and handling emergencies in the theatre; and

(E)  read and analyze scripts to determine technical theatre elements.

(2)  Creative expression: performance. The student develops and demonstrates technical theatre skills through the pre-production processes from concept (script or original idea) to performance. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and use technical elements in various theatrical styles and genres;

(B)  apply the design process, including analysis, research, incubation/selection, implementation, and evaluation, to a theatrical product such as a rendering, model, and sketch;

(C)  recognize the principles of design, including lines, shape, mass, measure, position, color, and texture;

(D)  recognize the principles of composition, including unity, harmony, contrast, variation, balance, proportion, and emphasis;

(E)  recognize the elements of color in design such as color theory, the science of color and light, and the color palette;

(F)  demonstrate understanding of communication methods between directors and designers such as prompt book, costume plot, light plot, makeup, theatre management, property list, design renderings, and models; and

(G)  practice proper measurement and scale as applied to design or construction.

(3)  Creative expression: production. The student focuses on a specific area of technical theatre production concepts and skills. The student demonstrates an understanding of and skills in scenery, props, lighting, costumes and makeup, sound, or theatre management. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and safely use technical theatre tools, equipment, and materials;

(B)  develop theatre production skills by:

(i)  building scenery such as two-dimensional flats and three-dimensional stairs;

(ii)  building or pulling and altering costumes using safe costume construction techniques;

(iii)  hanging and focusing lighting instruments and using dimmers and controllers;

(iv)  identifying electrical theory and practice as it applies to theatrical lighting;

(v)  recording, editing, or creating sound effects;

(vi)  identifying marketing products for theatrical productions;

(vii)  practicing stage management techniques such as build a promptbook, call cues, and record blocking;

(viii)  identifying and applying scenic painting techniques; or

(ix)  identifying and applying stage properties practices such as buy, borrow, build, and organize; and

(C)  read and interpret technical theatre documents such as light plots, costume plots, renderings, ground plans, and cue sheets.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply historical or cultural accuracy from research in theatrical design;

(B)  analyze the impact of live theatre, film, television, and electronic media on contemporary society;

(C)  analyze the cultural heritages of world drama and theatre and identify key figures, works, and trends in technical theatre;

(D)  explain the historical development, discoveries, and periods in theatre architecture and stage technology influences such as Latin American marionettes, Greek amphitheater, Asian Noh and Kabuki theatre, Italian Renaissance innovation, and Indian puppet theatre and their influences on modern theatre;

(E)  illustrate how technology has changed theatre such as how stage lighting has progressed from limelight to digital light;

(F)  understand the multicultural heritage of United States drama and theatre and identify key figures, works, and trends in technical theatre; and

(G)  identify and understand the innovations and contributions of the United States to the performing arts such as theatre, melodrama, musical theatre, radio, film, television, technology, or electronic media.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and evaluates theatre and theatrical performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  compile materials to construct a resume and portfolio of works created in technical theatre;

(B)  analyze and apply appropriate behavior of technical staff at various types of live performances;

(C)  recognize the design and technical elements of theatre as an art form and evaluate self as a creative being;

(D)  offer and receive constructive criticism of designs or construction projects by peers and self;

(E)  evaluate live theatre in written and oral form with precise and specific observations of technical elements using appropriate vocabulary;

(F)  evaluate film, television, or other media in written or oral form with precise and specific observations of technical elements using appropriate vocabulary;

(G)  explore career and avocational opportunities in theatre, television, film, or industries such as design, construction, management, theatre education, and arts administration and evaluate the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed to pursue such opportunities;

(H)  connect theatre skills and experiences to higher education and careers outside of the theatre; and

(I)  use technology to communicate and present findings in a clear and coherent manner.

Source: The provisions of this §117.324 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.325. Technical Theatre, Level III, Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following technical theatre courses: Technical Theatre, Level III (one credit), Advanced Lighting and Sound (one-half to one credit), Advanced Stagecraft (one-half to one credit), Advanced Costume Construction (one-half to one credit), Makeup for the Theatre (one-half to one credit), Advanced Design for the Theatre (one-half to one credit), and Advanced Theatre Management (one-half to one credit). A Technical Theatre, Level II course is suggested as a prerequisite for Technical Theatre, Level III courses.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: inquiry and understanding; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through the foundations: inquiry and understanding strand, students develop a perception of self, human relationships, and the world using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. Through the creative expression strand, students communicate in a dramatic form, engage in artistic thinking, build positive self-concepts, relate interpersonally, and integrate knowledge with other content areas in a relevant manner. Through the historical and cultural relevance strand, students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions in theatre and the diversity of world cultures as expressed in theatre. Through the critical evaluation and response strand, students engage in inquiry and dialogue, accept constructive criticism, revise personal views to promote creative and critical thinking, and develop the ability to appreciate and evaluate live theatre.

(3)  Through a variety of experiences with technical theatre, Technical Theatre III will afford students the opportunity to continue to study and develop their knowledge of technical theatre arts on a more challenging level. Students explore and apply a myriad of technical theatre concepts and skills. Students will exercise and develop creativity, intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem solving, and collaborative skills. Participation and evaluation in a variety of theatrical experiences will afford students opportunities to develop an understanding of self and their role in the world.

(4)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: inquiry and understanding. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the world using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate proper use of standard vocabulary in costumes, lights, makeup, theatre management, properties, scenery, and sound;

(B)  demonstrate a working knowledge of the technical elements of theatre such as types of stages, stage areas, fly systems, curtains, front of house, dressing rooms, and storage;

(C)  create and use established theatre systems such as the production calendar, tech rehearsals, and production staff roles;

(D)  use and model safe theatre practices such as personal safety, fire safety, tool safety, shop safety, and handling emergencies in the theatre; and

(E)  read scripts and apply basic script analysis techniques to technical theatre elements.

(2)  Creative expression: performance. The student develops and demonstrates technical theatre skills through the pre-production processes from concept (script or original idea) to performance. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and use technical elements in various theatrical styles and genres;

(B)  apply the design process, including analysis, research, incubation/selection, implementation, and evaluation, to a theatrical product such as a rendering, model, or sketch;

(C)  apply the principles of design, including lines, shape, mass, measure, position, color, and texture;

(D)  apply the principles of composition, including unity, harmony, contrast, variation, balance, proportion, and emphasis;

(E)  apply the elements of color in design such as color theory, the science of color and light, and the color palette;

(F)  manage and work collaboratively with the production team such as designers, director, crew members, playwright, and stage manager;

(G)  defend the importance of collaboration and leadership skills;

(H)  develop creativity as it relates to personal expression in technical theatre and design;

(I)  interpret technical theatre documents used by directors and designers to communicate such as costume plot, light plot, makeup chart, prompt book, property list, design renderings, and models; and

(J)  practice the basics of measurement and scale applied to drafting, design, or construction.

(3)  Creative expression: production. The student focuses on a specific area of technical theatre production concepts and skills. The student demonstrates an understanding of and skills in scenery, props, lighting, costumes and makeup, sound, or theatre management. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and safely use specialized tools and materials in technical theatre;

(B)  develop theatre production skills by:

(i)  demonstrating design and building techniques of scenery;

(ii)  designing and building or pulling and altering costumes;

(iii)  designing lighting and using electrical theory and practice as it applies to theatrical lighting;

(iv)  demonstrating an understanding of the physics of acoustics and sound through the design of sound;

(v)  designing marketing products for theatrical productions;

(vi)  demonstrating stage management techniques such as build a promptbook, call cues, and record blocking;

(vii)  implementing and refining scenic painting techniques; or

(viii)  designing stage properties;

(C)  identify various production roles in all technical areas such as designer, master carpenter, draper, cutter, and master electrician; and

(D)  create and interpret technical theatre documents such as light plots, costume plots, renderings, ground plans, and cue sheets.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate a working knowledge of historical or cultural accuracy from research in theatrical design;

(B)  synthesize the impact of live theatre, film, television, and electronic media on contemporary society;

(C)  synthesize the cultural heritages of world drama and theatre and identify key figures, works, and trends in dramatic literature;

(D)  demonstrate a working knowledge of the historical development, discoveries, and periods in theatre architecture and stage technology such as Latin American marionettes, Greek amphitheater, Asian Noh and Kabuki theatre, Italian Renaissance innovation, and Indian puppet theatre and their influences on modern theatre;

(E)  illustrate how technology has changed theatre such as how stage lighting has progressed from limelight to digital light;

(F)  analyze the multicultural heritage of United States drama and theatre and identify key figures, works, and trends in dramatic literature; and

(G)  demonstrate a working knowledge of the innovations and contributions of the United States to the performing arts such as theatre, melodrama, musical theatre, radio, film, television, technology, or electronic media.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and evaluates theatre and theatrical performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  construct a resume and portfolio of works created in technical theatre;

(B)  demonstrate appropriate behavior of technical staff at various types of live performances;

(C)  apply the design and technical elements of theatre as an art form and evaluate self as a creative being;

(D)  offer and receive constructive criticism of designs or construction projects by peers and self;

(E)  evaluate live theatre in written and oral form with precise and specific observations of technical elements using appropriate vocabulary;

(F)  evaluate film, television, or other media in written or oral form with precise and specific observations of technical elements using appropriate vocabulary;

(G)  articulate career and avocational opportunities in theatre, television, film, or industries such as design, construction, management, theatre education, and arts administration and evaluate the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed to pursue such opportunities;

(H)  articulate connections in theatre skills and experiences to higher education and careers outside of the theatre; and

(I)  use technology to communicate and present findings in a clear and coherent manner.

Source: The provisions of this §117.325 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


§117.326. Technical Theatre, Level IV, Adopted 2013.

(a)  General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following technical theatre courses: Technical Theatre, Level IV, Advanced Lighting and Sound (one-half to one credit), Advanced Stagecraft (one-half to one credit), Advanced Costume Construction (one-half to one credit), Makeup for the Theatre (one-half to one credit), Advanced Design for the Theatre (one-half to one credit), and Advanced Theatre Management (one-half to one credit). A Technical Theatre, Level III course is suggested as a prerequisite for Technical Theatre, Level IV courses.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.

(2)  Four basic strands--foundations: inquiry and understanding; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Through the foundations: inquiry and understanding strand, students develop a perception of self, human relationships, and the world using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. Through the creative expression strand, students communicate in a dramatic form, engage in artistic thinking, build positive self-concepts, relate interpersonally, and integrate knowledge with other content areas in a relevant manner. Through the historical and cultural relevance strand, students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions in theatre and the diversity of world cultures as expressed in theatre. Through the critical evaluation and response strand, students engage in inquiry and dialogue, accept constructive criticism, revise personal views to promote creative and critical thinking, and develop the ability to appreciate and evaluate live theatre.

(3)  Through a variety of experiences with technical theatre, Technical Theatre IV will afford students the opportunity to complete a more intense study of a specific area of technical theatre. Through more independent study and increased production responsibilities, study in Technical Theatre IV involves the application of expertise prepared for and acquired in previous theatre art studies. Students explore and apply a myriad of technical theatre concepts and skills. Students will exercise and develop creativity, intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem solving, and collaborative skills. Participation and evaluation in a variety of theatrical experiences will afford students opportunities to develop an understanding of self and their role in the world.

(4)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Foundations: inquiry and understanding. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment using elements of drama and conventions of theatre. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate proper and regular use of standard vocabulary in costumes, lights, makeup, theatre management, properties, scenery, and sound;

(B)  demonstrate a working knowledge of the technical elements of theatre such as types of stages, stage areas, fly systems, curtains, front of house, dressing rooms, and storage;

(C)  use and create established theatre systems such as the production calendar, tech rehearsals, and production staff roles;

(D)  use and model safe theatre practices such as personal safety, fire safety, tool safety, shop safety, and handling emergencies in the theatre; and

(E)  read scripts and apply basic script analysis techniques to technical theatre elements.

(2)  Creative expression: performance. The student develops and demonstrates technical theatre skills through the pre-production processes from concept (script or original idea) to performance. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze technical elements in various theatrical styles and genres;

(B)  demonstrate creativity in the design of a theatrical product;

(C)  demonstrate leadership skills in an area of the production team;

(D)  model collaboration and leadership skills;

(E)  model creativity as it relates to personal expression in technical theatre and design; and

(F)  model communication methods between directors and designers such as prompt book, costume plot, light plot, makeup, theatre management, property list, design renderings, and models.

(3)  Creative expression: production. The student focuses on a specific area of technical theatre production concepts and skills. The student is expected to demonstrate an understanding of and skills in scenery, props, lighting, costumes and makeup, sound, or theatre management. The student is expected to:

(A)  model effective and safe use of tools and materials in scenery and property construction;

(B)  develop skills to supervise safe construction of scenery;

(C)  develop skills to supervise safe use of the basic techniques of costume construction and make-up application;

(D)  develop skills to supervise safe use of lighting equipment such as instruments, dimmers, and controllers;

(E)  develop skills to supervise safe use of sound equipment; and

(F)  demonstrate an understanding of management skills in a theatre production such as house manager, stage manager, marketing manager, or producer.

(4)  Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates theatre to history, society, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A)  defend historical or cultural accuracy in theatrical design;

(B)  articulate the impact of live theatre, film, television, and electronic media on contemporary society;

(C)  articulate the impact of cultural heritages of world drama and theatre and identify key figures, works, and trends in technical theatre;

(D)  articulate the impact of multicultural heritage of United States drama and theatre and identify key figures, works, and trends in technical theatre; and

(E)  predict future innovations and contributions of the United States to the performing arts.

(5)  Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and evaluates theatre and theatrical performances. The student is expected to:

(A)  use a resume and portfolio of works created in technical theatre;

(B)  model appropriate behavior of technical staff at various types of live performances;

(C)  defend the design and technical elements of theatre as an art form and evaluate self as a creative being;

(D)  offer and receive constructive criticism of designs or construction projects by peers and self;

(E)  evaluate live theatre in written and oral form with precise and specific observations of technical elements using appropriate vocabulary;

(F)  evaluate film, television, or other media in written or oral form with precise and specific observations of technical elements using appropriate vocabulary;

(G)  articulate career and avocational opportunities in theatre, television, film, or industries such as design, construction, management, theatre education, and arts administration and evaluate the training, skills, self-discipline, and artistic discipline needed to pursue such opportunities;

(H)  articulate connections in theatre skills and experiences to higher education and careers outside of the theatre; and

(I)  use technology to communicate and present findings in a clear and coherent manner.

Source: The provisions of this §117.326 adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg 4575.


For more information, email rules@tea.state.tx.us.