Chapter 130. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Career and Technical Education

Subchapter B. Architecture and Construction


Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter B issued under the Texas Education Code, §§7.102(c)(4), 28.002, 28.00222, and 28.025, unless otherwise noted.


§130.41. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Architecture and Construction, Adopted 2015.

(a)  The provisions of this subchapter shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2017-2018 school year.

(b)  No later than August 31, 2016, the commissioner of education shall determine whether instructional materials funding has been made available to Texas public schools for materials that cover the essential knowledge and skills for career and technical education as adopted in §§130.42-130.72 of this subchapter.

(c)  If the commissioner makes the determination that instructional materials funding has been made available under subsection (b) of this section, §§130.42-130.72 of this subchapter shall be implemented beginning with the 2017-2018 school year and apply to the 2017-2018 and subsequent school years.

(d)  If the commissioner does not make the determination that instructional materials funding has been made available under subsection (b) of this section, the commissioner shall determine no later than August 31 of each subsequent school year whether instructional materials funding has been made available. If the commissioner determines that instructional materials funding has been made available, the commissioner shall notify the State Board of Education and school districts that §§130.42-130.72 of this subchapter shall be implemented for the following school year.

Source: The provisions of this §130.41 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.42. Principles of Architecture (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  Principles of Architecture provides an overview to the various fields of architecture, interior design, and construction management. Achieving proficiency in decision making and problem solving is an essential skill for career planning and lifelong learning. Students use self-knowledge, education, and career information to set and achieve realistic career and educational goals. Job-specific training can be provided through training modules that identify career goals in trade and industry areas. Classroom studies include topics such as safety, work ethics, communication, information technology applications, systems, health, environment, leadership, teamwork, ethical and legal responsibility, employability, and career development and include skills such as problem solving, critical thinking, and reading technical drawings.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify employment opportunities, including entrepreneurship and preparation requirements, for careers in the architecture and construction cluster;

(B)  demonstrate an understanding of group participation and leadership related to citizenship and career preparation;

(C)  identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(D)  apply the competencies related to resources, information, systems, and technology in appropriate settings and situations; and

(E)  demonstrate knowledge of the concepts and skills related to health and safety in the workplace, as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(2)  The student performs mathematical operations to complete tasks such as measuring and estimating materials and supplies. The student is expected to:

(A)  determine areas and volumes of various structures and estimate materials and supplies using appropriate geometric formulas and calculations;

(B)  determine percentages and decimals and use percentages and decimals to perform measurement tasks using appropriate formulas and calculations;

(C)  determine ratios, fractions, and proportions using appropriate formulas and calculations;

(D)  perform measurement tasks using ratios, fractions, and proportions; and

(E)  estimate materials and supplies using dimensions, spaces, and structures calculations.

(3)  The student uses physics skills to work with materials and load applications. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply basic concepts of static and loads to planning; and

(B)  identify the physical properties present when using common construction materials in order to use the materials safely, effectively, and efficiently.

(4)  The student manages chemical materials safely. The student is expected to:

(A)  recognize the issues present when mixing compatible and incompatible substances to maintain workplace and jobsite safety;

(B)  differentiate between incompatible and compatible substances;

(C)  describe the chemical process that occurs when using common construction materials to maintain workplace and jobsite safety; and

(D)  apply chemical processes in relation to environmental conditions.

(5)  The student reads, comprehends, and communicates effectively in the workplace, using proper grammar and workplace terminology when using printed, written, and electronic media. The student is expected to:

(A)  use technological applications to transmit reports;

(B)  develop written communications such as estimates, work orders, and memos;

(C)  read and follow technical instructions and manuals;

(D)  compose an accurate and organized diary or log of work; and

(E)  write reports and documents such as estimates, permits, memos, and technical reports.

(6)  The student listens attentively and speaks clearly to convey information correctly. The student is expected to:

(A)  confirm understanding of verbal and visual instructions; and

(B)  ask relevant questions concerning details of instructions.

(7)  The student listens to and speaks clearly with a variety of individuals to enhance communications skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  provide verbal instructions; and

(B)  listen attentively to spoken messages to respond to information.

(8)  The student exhibits public relations skills to address a variety of situations such as increasing internal and external customer and client satisfaction. The student is expected to:

(A)  communicate effectively to develop positive customer and client relationships;

(B)  develop and maintain customer relations;

(C)  define customer and client satisfaction; and

(D)  evaluate customer and client satisfaction.

(9)  The student identifies the relationship between available resources and requirements of a project to accomplish realistic planning. The student is expected to:

(A)  initiate a project, including identifying resources and materials and time-management, labor-management, job-management, and job-site obligations in order to effectively plan;

(B)  plan a project, including estimating correct amounts of required resources and materials and identifying risks;

(C)  evaluate the feasibility of alternative suggestions;

(D)  execute, monitor, and control a project using available resources and materials effectively; and

(E)  close a project, including identifying lessons learned and evaluating waste of resources and materials.

(10)  The student evaluates and adjusts plans and schedules to respond to unexpected events and conditions. The student is expected to:

(A)  incorporate potential job disruptions into planning timelines;

(B)  identify potential events and conditions that disrupt the completion of a job;

(C)  solve situational problems involved with unexpected events and conditions;

(D)  adjust plans and schedules to meet project needs;

(E)  modify existing plans and schedules to reflect an unexpected change;

(F)  identify and assess critical situations as they arise to resolve issues with the best solution; and

(G)  present a project update to track changes necessitated by unexpected events and conditions.

(11)  The student synthesizes and reports conditions to keep the organization appraised of progress and potential problems. The student is expected to:

(A)  provide a project update for stakeholders; and

(B)  present a verbal or written status report on a project.

(12)  The student uses technological applications specific to architecture and construction to access, manage, integrate, and create information. The student is expected to:

(A)  manage personal and professional schedules and contact information;

(B)  manage daily, weekly, and monthly schedules using an application; and

(C)  create memos and notes.

(13)  The student uses electronic devices to communicate. The student is expected to:

(A)  access an electronic system using login and password functions;

(B)  access electronic messages received;

(C)  create electronic messages in accordance with established business standards such as grammar, word usage, spelling, sentence structure, clarity, and etiquette;

(D)  practice appropriate electronic message etiquette;

(E)  send electronic messages;

(F)  use electronic devices to share files and documents;

(G)  access electronic devices for attachments;

(H)  attach documents to electronic messages; and

(I)  save electronic messages and attachments.

(14)  The student uses writing and publishing applications. The student is expected to:

(A)  prepare simple documents and other business communications;

(B)  retrieve existing documents;

(C)  create documents such as letters, memos, and reports using existing forms and templates;

(D)  safeguard documents using name and save functions;

(E)  format text using basic formatting functions; and

(F)  employ word processing utility tools such as spell check, grammar check, and thesaurus.

(15)  The student uses spreadsheet applications. The student is expected to:

(A)  create, retrieve, edit, save, and print spreadsheets;

(B)  perform calculations and analysis on data;

(C)  group worksheets;

(D)  create charts and graphs from a spreadsheet;

(E)  perform calculations using simple formulas; and

(F)  input and process data using spreadsheet functions.

(16)  The student uses database applications. The student is expected to:

(A)  manipulate data elements;

(B)  enter data using a form;

(C)  locate and replace data using search and replace functions; and

(D)  process data using database functions such as structure, format, attributes, and relationships.

(17)  The student uses collaborative applications. The student is expected to:

(A)  facilitate group work through management of shared schedules and contact information;

(B)  manage daily, weekly, and monthly schedules using an application; and

(C)  maintain a shared database of contact information.

(18)  The student complies with governmental regulations and applicable codes to establish a legal and safe environment. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify occupation-specific governmental regulations and national, state, and local building codes to establish appropriate regulations and codes;

(B)  comply with governmental regulations and building codes;

(C)  read and discuss information on Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and other safety regulations; and

(D)  read and discuss Safety Data Sheet (SDS) information to manage and dispose of hazardous materials.

(19)  The student examines all aspects of the built environment and systems to complete project planning. The student is expected to:

(A)  align and incorporate the built environment and its systems to complete the project;

(B)  label all systems on a set of construction documents;

(C)  discuss the interrelationship of the systems in the built environment; and

(D)  use a sequential method such as the critical path method so that work progresses efficiently.

(20)  The student applies industry standards and practices to ensure quality work. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify current industry standards and practices in order to incorporate quality into projects;

(B)  document how quality improves profitability;

(C)  report on issues that affect quality;

(D)  use industry standards and practices to enhance appreciation for quality workmanship; and

(E)  perform work that meets or exceeds the quality standards of the industry.

(21)  The student observes rules and regulations to comply with personal and occupational health and safety standards. The student is expected to:

(A)  follow appropriate safety standards to ensure a safe environment;

(B)  practice safety rules and regulations;

(C)  identify safety precautions and hazards to ensure a safe environment; and

(D)  use appropriate safety practices and equipment, including personal protective equipment.

(22)  The student works as an individual and as a team member to accomplish assignments. The student is expected to:

(A)  use human relations skills to work cooperatively with coworkers representing different cultures, genders, and backgrounds;

(B)  track team goals to contribute constructively and positively to the team;

(C)  match team members to appropriate activities;

(D)  manage skills to effectively accomplish assignments;

(E)  effectively use conflict-resolution skills with coworkers to maintain a smooth workflow; and

(F)  use mentoring skills to inspire and motivate others to achieve and enhance performance.

(23)  The student exhibits personal accountability, integrity, and responsibility to enhance confidence among coworkers. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply the professional and ethical standards of the industry to personal conduct;

(B)  practice professional and ethical standards;

(C)  maintain personal integrity;

(D)  promote personal and professional integrity in coworkers; and

(E)  recognize integrity in others.

(24)  The student reads regulations and contracts to ensure ethical and safety elements are observed. The student is expected to:

(A)  study regulations and codes to identify those applicable to the local area;

(B)  locate and implement regulations and codes applicable to tasks and projects;

(C)  comply with local, state, and federal agencies and model code-setting organizations;

(D)  recognize the definition of specialized words or phrases to fully understand documents and contracts;

(E)  use industry jargon or terminology appropriately;

(F)  use industry acronyms correctly;

(G)  use words with multiple meanings correctly in context; and

(H)  use ethical and legal standards to avoid conflicts of interest.

(25)  The student recognizes a positive work ethic to comply with employment requirements. The student is expected to:

(A)  exhibit behaviors showing reliability and dependability;

(B)  recognize appropriate dress for the work environment; and

(C)  recognize the required employment forms and documentation such as I-9, work visa, W-4, and licensures to meet employment requirements.

(26)  The student recognizes requirements for career advancement to plan for continuing education and training. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify opportunities for career advancement to formulate career goals;

(B)  identify a career ladder;

(C)  develop a career advancement plan;

(D)  review progress of a career advancement plan;

(E)  maintain positive interpersonal skills to enhance advancement potential;

(F)  explore education and training opportunities to acquire skills necessary for career advancement;

(G)  list postsecondary educational paths associated with the architecture and construction trades, including college, apprenticeship, and specialty trade schools;

(H)  explore costs associated with postsecondary education;

(I)  participate in professional development opportunities such as professional organizations and associations, trade shows, and seminars;

(J)  read professional journals, magazines, manufacturers' catalogs, industry publications, and Internet sites to keep current on industry trends; and

(K)  identify declining and emerging occupations, practices, and procedures.

(27)  The student examines the organization and structure of various segments of the industry to prepare for career advancement. The student is expected to:

(A)  recognize segments of the construction industry and show the relationships to specialty areas;

(B)  obtain necessary knowledge and skills to enhance employability;

(C)  research local and regional labor markets and job growth information to project potential for advancement;

(D)  identify sources of career information;

(E)  identify job opportunities for the trade;

(F)  identify organizations that offer career and job placement;

(G)  analyze potential growth of identified careers;

(H)  apply labor market and job growth information to career goals;

(I)  examine licensing, certification, and credentialing requirements at the national, state, and local levels to achieve compliance;

(J)  align licensing, certification, and credentialing requirements to career goals in order to plan for career advancement;

(K)  use technologies and resources to research licensing, certification, and credentialing;

(L)  evaluate and select suitable sources of licensing, certification, and credentialing;

(M)  identify licenses, certifications, and credentials applicable to career goals; and

(N)  document sources and agencies for licensing and certification and credentialing information, including contact information.

(28)  The student initiates and maintains a career portfolio to document knowledge, skills, and abilities. The student is expected to:

(A)  select education, work history, and skills to create a personal resume;

(B)  develop a resume using word processing technology;

(C)  contact professional references to acquire recommendations;

(D)  obtain appropriate letters of recommendation; and

(E)  document and maintain a record of work experiences, licenses, certifications, credentials, and education and training to build a portfolio.

(29)  The student reads technical drawings and documents to plan a project. The student is expected to:

(A)  interpret blueprints and drawings to assist with project planning;

(B)  recognize elements and symbols of blueprints and drawings;

(C)  relate information on blueprints to actual locations on the print;

(D)  recognize different classifications of drawings; and

(E)  interpret and use drawing dimensions.

(30)  The student uses and maintains appropriate tools, machines, and equipment to accomplish project goals. The student is expected to:

(A)  select tools, machinery, and equipment to match requirements of the project;

(B)  safely operate tools, machinery, and equipment;

(C)  maintain and care for tools, machines, and equipment;

(D)  use tools, machines, and equipment productively and efficiently in alignment with industry standards;

(E)  identify sources of information concerning state-of-the-art tools, equipment, materials, technologies, and methodologies;

(F)  read current periodicals, industry publications, and manufacturers' catalogs; and

(G)  explore state-of-the-art tools, equipment, materials, technologies, and methodologies.

Source: The provisions of this §130.42 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.43. Principles of Construction (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  Principles of Construction is intended to provide an introduction and lay a solid foundation for those students entering the construction or craft skilled areas. The course provides a strong knowledge of construction safety, construction mathematics, and common hand and power tools. For safety and liability considerations, limiting course enrollment to 15 students is recommended. This course also provides communication and occupation skills to assist the student in obtaining and maintaining employment.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the role of an employee in the construction industry;

(B)  demonstrate critical-thinking skills;

(C)  demonstrate the ability to solve problems using critical-thinking skills;

(D)  demonstrate knowledge of basic computer systems;

(E)  explain common uses for computers in the construction industry;

(F)  define effective relationship skills;

(G)  recognize workplace issues such as sexual harassment, stress, and substance abuse;

(H)  explain the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) General Duty Clause; and

(I)  explain OSHA 1926 CFR Subpart C.

(2)  The student understands that safe working standards are imperative in the classroom and in the field. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the idea of a safety culture;

(B)  explain the importance of a safety culture in the construction crafts;

(C)  explain the role of the OSHA in job-site safety;

(D)  explain fall protection, ladder safety, stair safety, and scaffold safety procedures;

(E)  demonstrate the use and care of appropriate personal protective equipment, including safety goggles and glasses, hard hats, gloves, safety harnesses, and safety shoes;

(F)  define safe work procedures around electrical hazards; and

(G)  explain the importance of Safety Data Sheets (SDS).

(3)  The student understands the importance of recognizing potential hazards and preventing accidents in the classroom and in the field. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify causes of accidents;

(B)  identify impacts of accident costs;

(C)  define hazard recognition;

(D)  identify struck-by hazards;

(E)  identify caught-in-between hazards;

(F)  identify other construction hazards on the jobsite, including hazardous material exposures, environmental elements, welding and cutting hazards, confined spaces, and fires; and

(G)  explain the importance of hazard communication (HazCom).

(4)  The student understands basic construction mathematics. The student is expected to:

(A)  add, subtract, multiply, and divide whole numbers with and without a calculator;

(B)  add, subtract, multiply, and divide fractions;

(C)  add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals with and without a calculator;

(D)  convert decimals to percentages and percentages to decimals; and

(E)  convert fractions to decimals and decimals to fractions.

(5)  The student demonstrates basic measuring practices. The student is expected to:

(A)  use a standard ruler, a metric ruler, a measuring tape, and an architectural/engineering scale to measure;

(B)  explain what the metric system is and how it is important in the construction trade;

(C)  recognize and use metric units of length, weight, volume, and temperature; and

(D)  recognize some of the basic shapes used in the construction industry and apply basic geometric principles to measure them.

(6)  The student acquires knowledge about care and identification of hand tools. The student is expected to:

(A)  recognize and identify the basic hand tools and their purposes for the construction trades;

(B)  inspect basic hand tools visually to determine if they are safe for use; and

(C)  use the basic construction hand tools safely and properly.

(7)  The student acquires knowledge about care and identification of powered hand tools. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify powered hand tools commonly used in the construction trades;

(B)  practice safe and proper application of powered hand tools commonly used in the construction trades; and

(C)  explain how to properly maintain and clean powered hand tools commonly used in construction trades.

(8)  The student develops the basics of construction drawing. The student is expected to:

(A)  interpret and use drawing dimensions;

(B)  recognize and identify basic construction terms;

(C)  recognize and identify basic drawing components;

(D)  recognize and identify commonly used drawing symbols;

(E)  relate information on construction drawings to actual locations on the print; and

(F)  recognize different classifications of construction drawings.

(9)  The student interprets and presents information used in workplace situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  interpret information and instructions presented in written form;

(B)  interpret information and instructions presented in verbal form;

(C)  communicate effectively using verbal and writing skills; and

(D)  communicate effectively on the job using electronic communication devices.

(10)  The student identifies ergonomic tools and procedures as well as safe material handling standards. The student is expected to:

(A)  define a load;

(B)  establish a pre-task plan prior to moving a load;

(C)  apply proper material-handling techniques;

(D)  choose appropriate material-handling equipment for the task; and

(E)  recognize hazards and follow safety procedures required for material handling.

Source: The provisions of this §130.43 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.44. Building Maintenance Technology I (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Architecture or Principles of Construction. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Building Maintenance Technology I, students will gain knowledge and skills needed to enter the field of building maintenance as a building maintenance technician or supervisor or secure a foundation for a postsecondary degree in construction management, architecture, or engineering. Students will acquire knowledge and skills in plumbing; electrical; and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Additionally, students will learn methods for repair and installation of drywall, roof, and insulation systems.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  express ideas and messages to others in a clear, concise, and effective manner, including explaining or conveying written information in a professional comprehensive manner;

(B)  compile data using numbers in various formats to solve job-appropriate problems;

(C)  demonstrate how to choose the ethical course of action and comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations;

(D)  demonstrate punctuality, dependability, reliability, and responsibility consistently in reporting for duty and performing assigned tasks as directed; and

(E)  evaluate systems and operations; identify causes, problems, patterns, or issues; and explore workable solutions or remedies to improve situations.

(2)  The student demonstrates knowledge of basic worksite safety regulations and safety guidelines such as in electrical work and carpentry. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate safe working procedures during building maintenance and repair;

(B)  explain the purpose of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and how to promote safety on a worksite;

(C)  identify worksite hazards and how to avoid or minimize them on a worksite;

(D)  explain safety obligations of workers, supervisors, and managers to ensure a safe worksite;

(E)  discuss the causes, effects, impacts, and costs of accidents;

(F)  define safe work procedures for working with hazardous chemicals;

(G)  define proper use of personal protective equipment; and

(H)  identify potential construction hazards, including hazardous material exposures, welding, cutting hazards, and confined spaces.

(3)  The student interprets various types of working drawings as they pertain to commercial construction and becomes familiar with all aspects of commercial construction documents, including architectural, engineering, and shop drawings. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the types of drawings usually included in a set of plans and list the information found on each type;

(B)  identify the different types of lines used on blueprint drawings;

(C)  identify selected electrical, mechanical, and plumbing symbols commonly used on plans;

(D)  identify selected architectural symbols commonly used to present materials on plans;

(E)  identify selected abbreviations commonly used on plans;

(F)  read and interpret plans, elevations, schedules, sections, and details contained in basic construction drawings;

(G)  describe the purpose of written specifications;

(H)  identify and describe the parts of a specification; and

(I)  demonstrate how to perform a quantity takeoff for materials.

(4)  The student demonstrates how to use hand tools that are commonly used in the worksite such as hammers, saws, levels, pullers, and clamps. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain and demonstrate the specific applications and uses of hand tools; and

(B)  identify the important safety and maintenance requirements for hand tools.

(5)  The student demonstrates how to use power tools that are commonly used in the worksite such as drills, grinders, saws, and sanders. The student is expect to:

(A)  explain and demonstrate appropriately the specific applications and uses of power tools; and

(B)  identify the important safety and maintenance requirements for power tools.

(6)  The student demonstrates how to use the latest technologies such as computer numeric control (CNC) machinery and plasma machinery. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the important safety issues of the latest technologies; and

(B)  identify the important maintenance issues of the latest technologies.

(7)  The student selects and installs various types of insulation in walls, floors, and attics and becomes familiar with the uses and installation practices for vapor barriers and waterproofing materials. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate how to properly remove, replace, and install various types of insulation, including batt, rigid, and blown materials; and

(B)  demonstrate how to use and install various vapor barriers and waterproofing materials.

(8)  The student installs various exterior siding materials, including wood, metal, vinyl, and cement board siding. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate the proper methods to install exterior finish materials, including wood, metal, vinyl, and cement board siding;

(B)  identify various fasteners used to install siding, including nails, screws, and adhesives;

(C)  describe the types and applications of stucco and masonry veneer finishes; and

(D)  install three types of siding commonly used in the local area.

(9)  The student gains knowledge of the types and grades of framing materials and the process for installation of metal framing for interior walls, exterior nonbearing walls, and partitions. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and use a system to install a frame wall or partition;

(B)  identify the fastening methods used for frame systems; and

(C)  identify methods used to secure steel frame systems to supporting structures.

(10)  The student knows various types of gypsum drywall and their uses and the fastening devices and methods used to install them. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the different types of drywall and their uses;

(B)  select the type and thickness of drywall required for specific installations;

(C)  explain the fastener schedules for different types of drywall installations;

(D)  perform single-layer and multi-layer drywall installations using different types of fastening systems, including nails, drywall screws, and adhesives;

(E)  install gypsum drywall on steel studs; and

(F)  estimate material quantities for a drywall installation.

(11)  The student knows the materials, tools, and methods used to finish and patch gypsum drywall. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the differences among the six levels of finish established by industry standards and distinguish a finish level by observation;

(B)  identify the hand tools used in drywall finishing and demonstrate the ability to use these tools;

(C)  identify the automatic tools used in drywall finishing;

(D)  identify the materials used in drywall finishing and describe the purpose and use of each type of material, including compounds, joint reinforcing tapes, trim materials, and textures and coatings;

(E)  finish drywall using hand tools;

(F)  recognize various types of problems that occur in drywall finishes;

(G)  identify the causes and correct method for solving each type of problem that occurs in drywall finishes; and

(H)  patch damaged drywall.

(12)  The student installs metal doors and related hardware in steel-framed, wood-framed, and masonry walls. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify various types of door jambs and frames and demonstrate the installation procedures for placing selected door jambs and frames in different types of interior partitions;

(B)  identify types of interior doors;

(C)  identify different types of interior door hardware and demonstrate the installation procedures for selected types;

(D)  list and identify specific items included on a typical door schedule; and

(E)  demonstrate the procedures for placing and hanging a selected door.

(13)  The student gains knowledge of the materials, layouts, and installations of various types of suspended ceilings used in commercial construction as well as ceiling tiles, drywall suspension systems, and pan-type ceilings. The student is expected to:

(A)  establish a level line;

(B)  explain the common terms related to sound waves and acoustical ceiling materials;

(C)  identify the different types of suspended ceilings;

(D)  interpret plans related to ceiling layout for a suspended ceiling;

(E)  sketch the ceiling layout for a suspended ceiling; and

(F)  install selected suspended ceilings.

(14)  The student knows the various types of trim used in finish work and the proper methods for selecting, cutting, and fastening trim. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the different types of standard moldings and describe their uses;

(B)  make square and miter cuts using a miter box or power miter saw;

(C)  make coped joint cuts using a coping saw; and

(D)  select and use fasteners to install trim, including door trim, window trim, base trim, and ceiling trim.

(15)  The student selects and installs base and wall cabinets and countertops. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the classes and sizes of typical base and wall cabinets;

(B)  identify cabinet components and hardware and describe their purposes;

(C)  lay out factory-made cabinets, countertops, and backsplashes; and

(D)  install plastic laminate on a countertop core.

(16)  The student selects and installs various types of floor coverings, including carpet, vinyl tile, ceramic tile, and wood flooring systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the methods used to install ceramic tile, carpet, and vinyl tile;

(B)  make repairs to ceramic tile, carpet, and vinyl tile; and

(C)  use and maintain the tools used for the installation and repair of floor systems, including wet saw, trowels, and carpet knives.

Source: The provisions of this §130.44 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.45. Building Maintenance Technology II (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Building Maintenance Technology I. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Building Maintenance Technology II, students will continue to gain advanced knowledge and skills needed to enter the workforce as a building maintenance technician or supervisor and construction project manager or secure a foundation for a postsecondary degree in construction management, architecture, or engineering. Students will acquire knowledge and skills in safety, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards, and safety devices in electrical circuits; maintenance of electrical and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems; and concepts of historic preservation.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  express ideas and messages to others in a clear, concise, and effective manner, including explaining and justifying actions convincingly and effectively conveying written information and messages in a socially acceptable manner that is easily understandable;

(B)  compile data using numbers in various formats to solve job-appropriate problems;

(C)  demonstrate an ability to be trustworthy and honest, to choose the ethical course of action, and to comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations;

(D)  demonstrate consistency, punctuality, dependability, reliability, and responsibility in reporting for duty and performing assigned tasks as directed; and

(E)  evaluate systems and operations; identify causes, problems, patterns, or issues; and explore workable solutions or remedies to improve situations.

(2)  The student demonstrates knowledge of basic worksite safety regulations and safety guidelines. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate safe working procedures during building maintenance and repair;

(B)  explain the purpose of the OSHA and how to promote on-site safety;

(C)  identify electrical hazards and how to avoid or minimize them;

(D)  explain obligations of workers, supervisors, and managers to ensure a safe work environment;

(E)  discuss the causes, effects, and costs of accidents; and

(F)  define safe work procedures regarding personal protective equipment, hazardous chemicals, and potential construction hazards, including hazardous material exposures, welding, cutting hazards, and confined spaces.

(3)  The student knows how to interpret blueprint drawings, various symbols, schematics, one-line diagrams, and wiring diagrams. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the basic layout of a blueprint drawing;

(B)  identify the common symbols used on commercial construction drawings; and

(C)  read equipment schedules found on blueprint drawings.

(4)  The student knows how to handle fuses and circuit breakers. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the necessity of overcurrent protection devices in electrical circuits;

(B)  define the terms associated with fuses and circuit breakers;

(C)  describe the operation of a circuit breaker;

(D)  describe the operation of single-element and time-delay fuses;

(E)  explain how ground fault circuit interrupters can save lives; and

(F)  describe troubleshooting and maintenance techniques for overcurrent devices.

(5)  The student installs various types of lamps and fixtures. The student is expected to:

(A)  recognize the different types of lamps and explain the advantages and disadvantages of different types such as incandescent, halogen, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge;

(B)  select and install lamps into lighting fixtures; and

(C)  install various lighting fixtures such as surface mounted, recessed, suspended, and track-mounted.

(6)  The student knows various methods to properly select, inspect, use, and maintain common electrical test equipment. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the operation of and describe various test equipment such as ammeter, voltmeter, volt-ohm-multimeter, and continuity tester;

(B)  explain how to read test equipment and convert from one scale to another;

(C)  explain the importance of proper meter polarity;

(D)  define frequency and explain the use of a frequency meter; and

(E)  explain the differences between digital and analog meters.

(7)  The student installs and maintains electrical devices and demonstrates wiring techniques common to residential and industrial facilities. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe how to determine electrical service requirements for residential and industrial facilities;

(B)  select the proper wiring methods for various residential and industrial facilities;

(C)  explain the role of the National Electrical Code;

(D)  compute branch circuit loads and explain their installation requirements;

(E)  explain the types of equipment grounding conductors such as ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI), light fixtures, receptors, and switches and their purposes;

(F)  distinguish between the sizes of outlet boxes and their various wiring methods;

(G)  describe the rules for installing electric space heating and HVAC systems equipment; and

(H)  describe the installation rules for electrical systems around swimming pools, spas, and hot tubs.

(8)  The student is introduced to the basic principles of HVAC systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the principles of HVAC systems;

(B)  describe what the Clean Air Act means to the HVAC systems industry; and

(C)  identify the types of schedules and drawings used in the HVAC systems and refrigeration industries.

(9)  The student installs, selects, prepares, joins, and supports copper and plastic pipes and fittings. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the precautions that must be taken when installing refrigerant piping;

(B)  select the right tubing for a project;

(C)  cut and bend copper tubing;

(D)  determine the kinds of hangers and supports needed for refrigeration piping;

(E)  describe the requirements for pressure-testing an installed system;

(F)  identify types of plastic pipe and describe their uses; and

(G)  cut and join lengths of plastic pipe.

(10)  The student operates, tests, and adjusts conventional and electronic thermostats as well as the common electrical, electronic, and pneumatic circuits used to control HVAC systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe how conventional and electronic thermostats operate;

(B)  describe how pneumatic and electronic circuits are used to control mechanical systems;

(C)  analyze circuit diagrams for electronic and microprocessor-based controls; and

(D)  troubleshoot systems using various controls.

(11)  The student knows the concepts of historic preservation and local and national resources to maintain and renovate historic structures and landscapes. The student is expected to:

(A)  research the U.S. Department of Interior's methods and guides for historic preservation;

(B)  describe the rules and regulations for historic preservation as prescribed by the Texas Historical Commission; and

(C)  describe the historic preservation building codes for a local area.

Source: The provisions of this §130.45 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.46. Construction Management I (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, and Principles of Architecture or Principles of Construction. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Construction Management I, students will gain knowledge and skills needed to enter the workforce as apprentice carpenters or building maintenance supervisors' assistants or to build a foundation toward a postsecondary degree in architecture, construction science, drafting, or engineering. Construction Management I includes the knowledge of design techniques and tools related to the management of architectural and engineering projects.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify employment opportunities, including entrepreneurship and career preparation requirements, in the field of construction management;

(B)  demonstrate an understanding of group participation and leadership related to career preparation;

(C)  identify employers' expectations, including appropriate work habits;

(D)  apply the competencies related to resource technology in appropriate settings; and

(E)  demonstrate knowledge of the concepts and skills related to health and safety in the workplace, as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(2)  The student applies academic skills to the requirements of construction management. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate effective verbal and written communication skills with individuals from varied cultures, including fellow workers, managers, and customers;

(B)  complete work orders and related paperwork;

(C)  estimate jobs, schedules, and industry standards related to legal restrictions;

(D)  read and interpret appropriate architectural symbols, schematics, blueprints, work drawings, manuals, and bulletins; and

(E)  apply descriptive geometry related to auxiliary views, revolutions, intersections, and piping drawings.

(3)  The student gains knowledge about building materials used in the construction industry, including lumber, sheet materials, engineered wood products, structural concrete, structural steel, fasteners, and adhesives used in construction settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify various types of construction materials and methods;

(B)  describe the uses of various types of hardwoods and softwoods;

(C)  identify the grades and markings of wood building materials;

(D)  describe the proper method of storing and handling building materials;

(E)  describe the uses of various types of engineered lumber;

(F)  calculate quantities of lumber and wood products using industry-standard methods; and

(G)  describe the fasteners, anchors, and adhesives used in construction work.

(4)  The student describes how a systems model can be used to describe construction activities, including mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply the universal systems model to construction activities;

(B)  identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with construction systems;

(C)  describe the subsystems used in construction; and

(D)  describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals.

(5)  The student selects and uses the proper construction technology to meet practical objectives. The student is expected to:

(A)  distinguish between architectural and civil construction systems;

(B)  apply construction technology to individual or community problems;

(C)  describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of constructed items; and

(D)  identify and describe the roles of construction.

(6)  The student designs an item for construction using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the design processes and techniques used in construction;

(B)  develop or improve a building or structure that meets specified needs; and

(C)  identify areas where quality, reliability, and safety can be designed into a building or structure.

(7)  The student investigates emerging and innovative construction technologies. The student is expected to:

(A)  report on emerging and innovative construction technologies; and

(B)  conduct research and experimentation in construction technology.

(8)  The student describes quality and how it is measured in construction. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe different quality control applications in construction; and

(B)  apply continuous quality improvement techniques to the construction of a building or structure.

(9)  The student builds buildings or structures using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials, and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the chemical, mechanical, and physical properties of construction materials;

(B)  describe the processes used in construction; and

(C)  construct buildings or structures using a variety of tools, equipment, and machines.

(10)  The student works safely with construction tools, equipment, machines, and materials. The student is expected to:

(A)  master relevant safety tests;

(B)  follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C)  identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D)  dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(11)  The student describes the importance of maintenance in construction. The student is expected to:

(A)  maintain tools and materials correctly;

(B)  perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C)  describe the results of negligent or improper maintenance.

(12)  The student manages a construction project. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop a plan for completing a construction project; and

(B)  participate in the organization and operation of a real or simulated construction project using project management processes, including initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing a project.

(13)  The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the importance of codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to construction technology;

(B)  identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to construction technology may be required; and

(C)  comply with appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(14)  The student describes the intended and unintended effects of technological solutions. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of technological developments in construction;

(B)  describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments;

(C)  discuss the international effects of construction technology; and

(D)  describe the issues related to regional and community planning.

(15)  The student identifies the factors that influence the evolution of construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe how changes in construction technology affect business and industry; and

(B)  describe how the evolution of construction technology has been influenced by past events.

(16)  The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop or improve a building or structure by following a problem-solving strategy; and

(B)  apply critical-thinking strategies to analyze and evaluate proposed technological solutions.

(17)  The student identifies the factors that influence the cost of goods and services in construction projects. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop a budget for a construction project; and

(B)  determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs.

(18)  The student knows the concepts and skills that form the technical knowledge of building carpentry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the uses of carpentry hardware and fasteners; and

(B)  demonstrate knowledge of fire ratings of construction materials.

(19)  The student knows the function and application of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in construction carpentry. The student is expected to:

(A)  use hand tools, power tools, and equipment commonly employed in carpentry in a safe manner;

(B)  handle and dispose of environmentally hazardous materials used in carpentry in the proper manner;

(C)  use the different types of scaffolding employed in building carpentry in a safe manner; and

(D)  demonstrate knowledge of new and emerging technologies that may affect construction carpentry.

(20)  The student applies the concepts and skills of the construction industry to simulated or actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  square, measure, and cut materials to specified dimensions;

(B)  handle different types of loads;

(C)  use framing techniques for walls, floors, ceilings, rafters, structural timbers, stairs, trusses, and fireproof metal-studs;

(D)  demonstrate the proper principles of drywall application; and

(E)  install doors, windows, interior and exterior wall covering, and trim.

(21)  The student knows the proper and safe use of hand and power tools. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the hand tools commonly used by carpenters and describe their uses;

(B)  use hand tools safely;

(C)  state the general safety rules for operating all power tools, regardless of type;

(D)  identify the portable power tools commonly used by carpenters and describe their uses; and

(E)  use portable power tools safely.

(22)  The student learns how to interpret architectural and engineering working drawings and specifications. The student will become familiar with the symbols and nomenclature specific to the construction industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the types of drawings usually included in a set of plans;

(B)  identify the different types of lines used on construction drawings;

(C)  identify selected architectural symbols commonly used to represent materials on plans;

(D)  identify selected electrical, mechanical, and plumbing symbols commonly used on plans;

(E)  identify selected abbreviations commonly used on plans;

(F)  read and interpret plans, elevations, schedules, sections, and details contained in basic construction drawings;

(G)  state the purpose of written specifications; and

(H)  demonstrate or describe how to perform a quantity takeoff for materials.

(23)  The student gains knowledge about the basics of wood framing, including layout and construction of wood-framed floor systems using common and engineered lumber. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the different types of framing systems;

(B)  interpret drawings with specifications to determine floor system requirements;

(C)  identify framing and support members as it refers to flooring;

(D)  name the methods used to fasten sills to the foundation;

(E)  given specific floor load and span data, select the proper girder and beam size from a list of available girders and beams;

(F)  list and recognize different types of bridging;

(G)  list and recognize different types of flooring materials;

(H)  explain the purposes of subflooring and underlayment;

(I)  select the appropriate fasteners to be used in various floor-framing systems;

(J)  estimate the amount of material needed to frame a floor assembly; and

(K)  demonstrate the ability to lay out and construct a floor assembly, including installing bridging; installing joists for a cantilever-floor; installing a subfloor using butt-joint plywood or oriented strand board panels; and installing a single floor system using tongue-and-groove plywood or oriented strand board panels.

(24)  The student understands how to lay out and frame walls and ceilings, rough-in door and window openings, construct corners and partition tee-bracing walls and ceilings, and apply sheathing. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the components of a wall and ceiling layout;

(B)  describe the procedure for laying out a wood frame wall, including plates, corner posts, door and window openings, partition Ts, bracing, and fire stops;

(C)  describe the correct procedure for assembling and erecting an exterior wall;

(D)  identify the common materials and methods for installing sheathing on walls;

(E)  describe or demonstrate how to lay out, assemble, erect, and brace exterior walls for a frame building;

(F)  describe wall-framing techniques used in masonry construction;

(G)  explain the use of metal studs in wall framing;

(H)  explain how to cut and install ceiling joists on a wood frame building; and

(I)  estimate the materials required for frame walls and ceilings.

(25)  The student investigates various types of framed roofs. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate an understanding of the terms associated with roof framing;

(B)  identify the roof-framing members used in gable and hip roofs;

(C)  identify the methods used to calculate the length of a rafter;

(D)  identify the various types of trusses used in roof framing;

(E)  use a framing square, speed square, and calculator in laying out a roof;

(F)  identify various types of sheathing used in roof construction;

(G)  frame or describe how to frame a gable roof with vent openings;

(H)  erect, or describe how to erect, a gable roof using trusses;

(I)  frame, or describe how to frame, a roof opening; and

(J)  estimate the materials used for framing and sheathing a roof.

(26)  The student describes various types of windows, skylights, and exterior doors. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify various types of fixed, sliding, and swinging windows;

(B)  identify the parts of a window installation;

(C)  state the requirements for proper window installation;

(D)  explain how to install a pre-hung window;

(E)  identify the common types of exterior doors and explain how they are constructed;

(F)  identify the parts of a door installation;

(G)  identify types of thresholds used with exterior doors;

(H)  install, or explain the procedure to install, a pre-hung exterior door;

(I)  identify the various types of locksets used on exterior doors and explain how the locksets are installed;

(J)  install a lockset; and

(K)  identify and explain the use and installation of various other door and window hardware, including security hinges, keepers, deadbolts, and peep holes.

(27)  The student describes various types of stairs and the common building code requirements related to stairs. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the various types of stairs;

(B)  identify the various parts of stairs;

(C)  identify the materials used in the construction of stairs;

(D)  interpret construction drawings of stairs; and

(E)  calculate the total rise, number and size of risers, and the number and size of treads required for a given stairway.

(28)  The student describes basic product marketing processes and techniques used in construction. The student is expected to prepare a marketing plan for an idea, product, or service.

(29)  The student investigates career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe an area of interest in construction and investigate its entry-level requirements and advancement opportunity requirements and its growth potential; and

(B)  identify the careers available in construction technology.

(30)  The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe how teams function;

(B)  describe the use of teamwork to solve problems;

(C)  distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D)  identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E)  identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F)  define discrimination, harassment, and inequality; and

(G)  describe the use of time-management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines.

Source: The provisions of this §130.46 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.47. Construction Management II (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Construction Management I. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Construction Management II, students will gain knowledge and skills needed to enter the workforce as apprentice carpenters or building maintenance supervisors' assistants or to build a foundation toward a postsecondary degree in architecture, construction science, drafting, or engineering. Construction Management II includes knowledge of the design, techniques, and tools related to the management of architectural and engineering projects.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply construction technology to individual or local problems;

(B)  identify the appropriate resources needed to solve problems; and

(C)  describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of buildings.

(2)  The student designs or modifies a structure using designated design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop or improve a building design that meets a specified need; and

(B)  develop and communicate ideas using specified design processes.

(3)  The student investigates emerging construction technologies. The student is expected to:

(A)  report on emerging construction technologies; and

(B)  conduct research in construction technology to determine its effectiveness.

(4)  The student describes quality and how it is measured in construction. The student is expected to:

(A)  construct items that meet a specified level of quality;

(B)  recommend how the quality of a building can be improved; and

(C)  explain the factors that affect the quality of buildings.

(5)  The student constructs buildings or scaled models using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials, and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the chemical, mechanical, and physical properties and standard units of measure of architectural construction materials such as concrete, masonry, and metals;

(B)  describe the processes used in construction; and

(C)  construct a building or a model of a building using a variety of tools, equipment, and machines.

(6)  The student works safely with construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  master relevant safety tests;

(B)  follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C)  identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes correctly;

(D)  dispose of hazardous materials and waste appropriately; and

(E)  recommend improvements in safety procedures.

(7)  The student performs basic maintenance on selected construction equipment and machines. The student is expected to:

(A)  maintain tools and materials correctly;

(B)  perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C)  develop a maintenance plan for selected machines and equipment.

(8)  The student manages construction technology projects. The student is expected to:

(A)  initiate a construction technology project;

(B)  plan a construction technology project, including developing a project schedule and describing use of resources needed;

(C)  execute a construction technology project;

(D)  monitor and control a construction technology project; and

(E)  close a construction technology project.

(9)  The student follows the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to architectural construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required;

(B)  locate the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations; and

(C)  comply with the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(10)  The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to architectural construction. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop or improve a building or structure by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B)  apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C)  apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(11)  The student determines the cost of constructing a building. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop a budget for a construction project; and

(B)  determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs.

(12)  The student applies communication, mathematical, and scientific knowledge and skills to construction activities. The student is expected to:

(A)  write technical reports;

(B)  make technical presentations to groups of individuals;

(C)  use mathematical concepts in construction technology; and

(D)  apply scientific principles used in construction technology.

(13)  The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe how teams function;

(B)  use teamwork to solve problems;

(C)  distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D)  identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E)  identify employers' expectations for appropriate work habits;

(F)  define discrimination, harassment, and inequality;

(G)  use time-management techniques to develop work schedules, maintain work schedules, and meet work schedule deadlines; and

(H)  complete work according to established criteria.

(14)  The student gains knowledge about the ingredients of concrete, various types of concrete, and methods to mix concrete. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the properties of cement;

(B)  describe the composition of concrete;

(C)  perform volume estimates for concrete quantity requirements;

(D)  describe types of concrete reinforcement materials;

(E)  describe various types of footings and explain their uses;

(F)  identify the parts of various types of forms;

(G)  explain the safety procedures associated with the construction of concrete forms; and

(H)  explain how to erect, plumb, and brace a simple concrete form with reinforcement.

(15)  The student uses a systems approach to investigate mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply the universal systems model to technological activities; and

(B)  identify the inputs, processes, outputs, and feedback associated with each of the systems.

(16)  The student works safely with mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  master relevant safety tests;

(B)  follow safety manuals, instructions, and requirements;

(C)  identify and classify hazardous materials and wastes; and

(D)  dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately.

(17)  The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to construction. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply problem-solving strategies;

(B)  apply critical-thinking strategies;

(C)  apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions; and

(D)  evaluate the impact of technology on scientific thought, society, and the environment.

(18)  The student applies communication, science, and mathematics knowledge and skills to construction activities. The student is expected to:

(A)  prepare technical reports and presentations;

(B)  solve algebraic equations;

(C)  solve problems in U.S. standard and metric units; and

(D)  perform unit conversions.

(19)  The student knows the laws governing motion. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze examples of uniform and accelerated motion, including linear, projectile, and circular motion;

(B)  evaluate the effects of forces on the motion of objects;

(C)  develop a free-body diagram for force analysis; and

(D)  analyze motion relative to different frames of reference.

(20)  The student knows the concept of momentum. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify linear and angular momentum; and

(B)  relate the conservation of momentum to linear and angular motion.

(21)  The student knows the concept of waves and vibrations. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate characteristics of wave motion; and

(B)  demonstrate how waves transmit energy.

(22)  The student knows the concept of energy conversion. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate the purpose of energy converters;

(B)  identify converters that change one form of energy to another; and

(C)  evaluate the efficiency of converting energy from one form to another.

(23)  The student knows the concept of energy transduction. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the function of a transducer;

(B)  distinguish between an energy converter and a transducer; and

(C)  identify transducers that change energy signals from one form to another.

(24)  The student knows the concept of radiant energy. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe radiation;

(B)  compare fission and fusion in terms of end products, energy, advantages, and availability; and

(C)  compare and contrast different types of radioactive decay.

(25)  The student knows the concept of light and optics. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify characteristics of optical devices;

(B)  analyze the characteristics of light, including reflection, refraction, and interference; and

(C)  interpret the effects of wave characteristics in daily applications such as lasers and optics in industrial and medical technology.

(26)  The student knows the concept of time constants. The student is expected to:

(A)  define a time constant; and

(B)  distinguish between a linear and non-linear increase and decrease of a variable with time.

(27)  The student describes basic product marketing processes and techniques used in construction. The student is expected to:

(A)  prepare a marketing plan for an idea, product, or service; and

(B)  discuss the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product or company.

(28)  The student investigates career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify an area of interest in construction and investigate its entry-level and advancement requirements and its growth potential; and

(B)  describe the careers available in construction.

(29)  The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe how teams function;

(B)  use teamwork to solve problems;

(C)  distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D)  identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E)  identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F)  define discrimination, harassment, and inequality;

(G)  use time-management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H)  complete work according to established criteria.

Source: The provisions of this §130.47 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.48. Construction Technology I (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Construction or Principles of Architecture. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Construction Technology I, students will gain knowledge and skills needed to enter the workforce as carpenters or building maintenance supervisors or to prepare for a postsecondary degree in construction management, architecture, or engineering. Students will acquire knowledge and skills in safety, tool usage, building materials, codes, and framing. For safety and liability considerations, limiting course enrollment to 15 students is recommended.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the role of an employee in the construction industry;

(B)  apply critical-thinking skills;

(C)  demonstrate the ability to solve problems using critical-thinking skills;

(D)  demonstrate knowledge of basic computer systems;

(E)  explain common uses for computers in the construction industry;

(F)  define effective relationship skills; and

(G)  recognize workplace issues such as sexual harassment, stress, and substance abuse.

(2)  The student understands that safe working standards are imperative in the classroom and in the field. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the idea of a safety culture;

(B)  explain the importance of a safety culture in the construction crafts;

(C)  explain the role of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in job-site safety;

(D)  explain fall protection, ladder safety, stair safety, and scaffold safety procedures;

(E)  explain the importance of hazard communication (HazCom);

(F)  explain the importance of Safety Data Sheets (SDS);

(G)  explain OSHA's General Duty Clause;

(H)  explain OSHA 1926 CFR Subpart C;

(I)  identify causes of accidents;

(J)  identify impacts of accident costs;

(K)  identify struck-by hazards;

(L)  identify caught-in-between hazards;

(M)  identify other construction hazards on the jobsite, including hazardous material exposures, environmental elements, welding and cutting hazards, confined spaces, and fires;

(N)  define safe work procedures around electrical hazards;

(O)  define hazard recognition;

(P)  define risk assessment techniques; and

(Q)  demonstrate the use and care of appropriate personal protective equipment, including safety goggles and glasses, hard hats, gloves, safety harnesses, and safety shoes.

(3)  The student identifies various opportunities in the field of carpentry and the characteristics a carpenter should possess. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify job opportunities and their accompanying job duties such as carpentry, building maintenance supervisor, architect, and engineer; and

(B)  research careers along with the education, job skills, and experience required to achieve them.

(4)  The student gains knowledge about building materials used in the construction industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify various types of building materials and their uses;

(B)  state the uses of various types of hardwoods and softwoods;

(C)  identify the different grades and markings of wood building materials;

(D)  describe the proper method of storing and handling building materials;

(E)  state the uses of various types of engineered lumber;

(F)  calculate the quantities of lumber and wood products using industry-standard methods; and

(G)  describe the fasteners, anchors, and adhesives used in construction work and explain their uses.

(5)  The student applies the proper and safe use of hand and power tools associated with carpentry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the hand tools commonly used by carpenters and describe their uses;

(B)  use hand tools in a safe and appropriate manner;

(C)  state the general safety rules for operating all power tools, regardless of type;

(D)  identify the portable power tools commonly used by carpenters and describe their uses; and

(E)  use portable power tools in a safe and appropriate manner.

(6)  The student interprets architectural and engineering working drawings and specifications. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the types of drawings usually included in a set of plans and list the information found on each type;

(B)  identify the different types of lines used on construction drawings;

(C)  identify selected architectural symbols commonly used to represent materials on plans;

(D)  identify selected electrical, mechanical, and plumbing symbols commonly used on plans;

(E)  identify selected abbreviations commonly used on plans;

(F)  read and interpret plans, elevations, schedules, sections, and details contained in basic construction drawings;

(G)  state the purpose of written specifications;

(H)  identify and describe the parts of a specification; and

(I)  demonstrate or describe how to perform a quantity takeoff for materials.

(7)  The student gains knowledge of wood framing and the layout and construction of wood-framed floor systems using common and engineered lumber. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the different types of framing systems;

(B)  read and interpret drawings and specifications to determine floor system requirements;

(C)  identify floor and sill framing and support members;

(D)  name the methods used to fasten sills to the foundation;

(E)  select the proper girder or beam size from a list of available girders or beams given specific floor load and span data;

(F)  list and recognize different types of bridging;

(G)  list and recognize different types of flooring materials;

(H)  explain the purposes of subflooring and underlayment;

(I)  select the appropriate fasteners to be used in various floor framing systems;

(J)  estimate the amount of material needed to frame a floor assembly;

(K)  lay out and construct a floor assembly;

(L)  install bridging;

(M)  install joists for a cantilever-floor;

(N)  install a subfloor using butt-joint plywood or oriented strand board panels; and

(O)  install a single floor system using tongue-and-groove (T&G) plywood or oriented strand board (OSB) panels.

(8)  The student knows how to lay out and frame walls and ceilings, rough-in door and window openings, construct corners and partition Ts, brace walls and ceilings, and apply sheathing. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the components of a wall and ceiling layout;

(B)  describe the procedure for laying out a wood frame wall, including the installation of plates, corner posts, door and window openings, partition Ts, bracings, and firestops;

(C)  describe the correct procedure for assembling and erecting an exterior wall;

(D)  identify the common materials and methods used for installing sheathing on walls;

(E)  lay out, assemble, erect, and brace exterior walls for a frame building;

(F)  describe wall framing techniques used in masonry construction;

(G)  explain the use of metal studs in wall framing;

(H)  cut and install ceiling joists on a wood frame building; and

(I)  estimate the materials required for frame walls and ceilings.

(9)  The student gains knowledge of various types of framed roofs and how to frame these roofs using both stick-build and truss-build systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate an understanding of the terms associated with roof framing;

(B)  identify the roof framing members used in gable and hip roofs;

(C)  identify the methods used to calculate the length of a rafter;

(D)  identify the various types of trusses used in roof framing;

(E)  use a framing square, speed square, and calculator in laying out a roof;

(F)  identify various types of sheathing used in roof construction;

(G)  frame a gable roof with vent openings;

(H)  erect a gable roof using trusses;

(I)  frame a roof opening; and

(J)  estimate the materials used for framing and sheathing a roof.

(10)  The student knows the ingredients of concrete, various types of concrete, and methods to mix concrete. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the properties of cement;

(B)  describe the composition of concrete;

(C)  perform volume estimates for concrete;

(D)  identify types of concrete reinforcement materials and describe their uses;

(E)  identify various types of footings and explain their uses;

(F)  identify the parts of various types of concrete forms;

(G)  explain the safety procedures associated with the construction and use of concrete forms; and

(H)  erect, plumb, and brace a simple concrete form with reinforcement.

(11)  The student gains knowledge of various types of windows, skylights, and exterior doors. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify various types of fixed, sliding, and swinging windows;

(B)  identify the parts of a window installation;

(C)  state the requirements for proper window installation;

(D)  install a pre-hung window;

(E)  identify the common types of exterior doors and explain how they are constructed;

(F)  identify the parts of a door installation;

(G)  identify types of thresholds used with exterior doors;

(H)  install a pre-hung exterior door;

(I)  identify the various types of locksets used on exterior doors and explain how the locksets are installed;

(J)  install a lockset; and

(K)  identify and explain the use and installation of various door and window hardware, including security hinges, keepers, deadbolts, and peep holes.

(12)  The student is introduced to various types of stairs and the common building code requirements related to stairs. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the various types of stairs;

(B)  identify the various parts of stairs;

(C)  identify the materials used in the construction of stairs;

(D)  interpret construction drawings of stairs;

(E)  calculate the total rise, number and size of risers, and the number and size of treads required for a given stairway;

(F)  lay out and cut stringers, risers, and treads; and

(G)  build a small stair unit with a temporary handrail.

Source: The provisions of this §130.48 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.49. Construction Technology II (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Construction Technology I. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Construction Technology II, students will gain advanced knowledge and skills needed to enter the workforce as carpenters, building maintenance technicians, or supervisors or to prepare for a postsecondary degree in construction management, architecture, or engineering. Students will build on the knowledge base from Construction Technology I and are introduced to exterior and interior finish out skills. For safety and liability considerations, limiting course enrollment to 15 students is recommended.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the role of an employee in the construction industry;

(B)  demonstrate critical-thinking skills;

(C)  demonstrate the ability to solve problems using critical-thinking skills;

(D)  demonstrate knowledge of basic computer systems;

(E)  explain common uses for computers in the construction industry;

(F)  define effective relationship skills; and

(G)  recognize workplace issues such as sexual harassment, stress, and substance abuse.

(2)  The student is provided with the knowledge to interpret various types of working drawings as they pertain to commercial construction. The student is expected to:

(A)  recognize the difference between commercial and residential construction drawings;

(B)  identify the basic keys, abbreviations, and other references contained in a set of commercial drawings;

(C)  accurately read a set of commercial drawings;

(D)  identify and document specific items from a door and window schedule;

(E)  explain basic construction details and concepts employed in commercial construction; and

(F)  calculate the floor area of each room in a floor plan.

(3)  The student selects and installs common roofing materials for residential and light commercial projects. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the materials and methods used in roofing;

(B)  explain the safety requirements for roof jobs;

(C)  install fiberglass shingles on gable and hip roofs;

(D)  close up a valley using fiberglass shingles;

(E)  explain how to make various roof projections watertight when using fiberglass shingles;

(F)  complete the proper cuts and install the main and hip ridge caps using fiberglass shingles;

(G)  lay out, cut, and install a cricket or saddle;

(H)  install wood shingles and shakes on roofs;

(I)  describe how to close up a valley using wood shingles and shakes;

(J)  complete the cuts and install the main and hip ridge caps using wood shakes or shingles; and

(K)  demonstrate the techniques for installing other selected types of roofing materials.

(4)  The student selects and installs various types of insulation in walls, floors, and attics. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the requirements for insulation;

(B)  describe the characteristics of various types of insulation material;

(C)  calculate the required amounts of insulation for a structure;

(D)  install selected insulation materials;

(E)  describe the requirements for moisture control and ventilation;

(F)  install selected vapor barriers;

(G)  describe various methods of waterproofing;

(H)  describe air infiltration control requirements; and

(I)  install selected building wraps.

(5)  The student learns the processes to install various exterior siding materials. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the purpose of wall insulation and flashing;

(B)  install selected common cornices;

(C)  demonstrate lap and panel siding estimating methods;

(D)  describe the types and applications of common wood siding;

(E)  describe fiber-cement siding and its uses;

(F)  describe the types and styles of vinyl and metal siding;

(G)  describe the types and applications of stucco and masonry veneer finishes; and

(H)  install three types of siding commonly used in the local area.

(6)  The student knows the types and grades of steel framing materials and the process for installing metal framing for interior walls, exterior nonbearing walls, and partitions. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the components of a steel framing system;

(B)  identify and select the tools and fasteners used in a steel framing system;

(C)  identify applications for steel framing systems;

(D)  demonstrate the ability to build back-to-back, box, and L-headers;

(E)  layout and install a steel stud structural wall with openings to include bracing and blocking; and

(F)  layout and install a steel-stud, non-structural wall with openings to include bracing and blocking.

(7)  The student knows various types of gypsum drywall and their uses and the fastening devices and methods used to install them. The student is expect to:

(A)  identify the different types of drywall and their uses;

(B)  select the type and thickness of drywall required for specific installations;

(C)  select fasteners for drywall installations;

(D)  explain the fastener schedules for different types of drywall installations;

(E)  perform single-layer and multi-layer drywall installations using different types of fastening systems, including nails, drywall screws, and adhesives;

(F)  install gypsum drywall on steel studs;

(G)  explain how soundproofing is achieved in drywall installations; and

(H)  estimate material quantities for a drywall installation.

(8)  The student knows the materials, tools, and methods used to finish and patch gypsum drywall. The student is expected to:

(A)  state the differences between the six levels of finish established by industry standards and distinguish between finish levels by observation;

(B)  identify the hand tools used in drywall finishing and demonstrate the ability to use these tools;

(C)  identify the automatic tools used in drywall finishing;

(D)  identify the materials used in drywall finishing and state the purpose and use of each type of material, including compounds, joint reinforcing tapes, trim materials, textures, and coatings;

(E)  finish drywall using hand tools;

(F)  recognize various types of problems that occur in drywall finishes and identify their causes;

(G)  identify the correct methods for solving each type of problem that occurs in drywall finishes; and

(H)  patch damaged drywall.

(9)  The student installs metal doors and related hardware in steel-framed, wood-framed, and masonry walls. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify various types of door jambs and frames;

(B)  demonstrate the installation procedures for placing door jambs and frames in different types of interior partitions;

(C)  identify different types of interior doors;

(D)  identify different types of interior door hardware and demonstrate the installation procedures for them;

(E)  list and identify items included on a typical door schedule; and

(F)  demonstrate the procedure for placing and hanging a door.

(10)  The student gains knowledge of the materials, layout, and installation of various types of suspended ceilings used in commercial construction as well as ceiling tiles, drywall suspension systems, and pan-type ceilings. The student is expected to:

(A)  establish a level line;

(B)  explain the common terms related to sound waves and acoustical ceiling materials;

(C)  identify the different types of suspended ceilings;

(D)  interpret plans related to ceiling layout;

(E)  sketch the ceiling layout for a basic suspended ceiling; and

(F)  install selected suspended ceilings.

(11)  The student knows the types of trim used in finish work. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the different types of standard moldings and describe their uses;

(B)  make square and miter cuts using a miter box or power miter saw;

(C)  make coped joint cuts using a coping saw;

(D)  select and use fasteners to install trim, including door trim, window trim, base trim, and ceiling trim; and

(E)  estimate the quantities of different trim materials required for selected rooms.

(12)  The student selects and installs base and wall cabinets and countertops. The student is expected to:

(A)  state the classes and sizes of typical base and wall kitchen cabinets;

(B)  identify cabinet components and hardware and describe their purposes;

(C)  lay out factory-made cabinets, countertops, and backsplashes;

(D)  explain the installation of an island base;

(E)  recognize the common types of woods used to make cabinets;

(F)  identify and cut the various types of joints used in cabinetmaking;

(G)  build a cabinet from a set of drawings; and

(H)  install plastic laminate on a countertop core.

Source: The provisions of this §130.49 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.50. Mill and Cabinetmaking Technology (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisites: Principles of Architecture and Principles of Construction. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Mill and Cabinetmaking Technology, students will gain knowledge and skills needed to enter the workforce in the area of mill work and cabinet manufacturing and installation. Students may also apply these skills to professions in carpentry or building maintenance supervision or use the skills as a foundation for a postsecondary degree in construction management, architecture, or engineering. Students will acquire knowledge and skills in cabinet design, tool usage, jointing methods, finishes, and industry-level practices such as numerical and computer-control production methods.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify employment opportunities, including entrepreneurship and preparation requirements, for mill and cabinetmaking;

(B)  demonstrate an understanding of group participation and leadership related to citizenship and career preparation;

(C)  identify employers' expectations for appropriate work habits;

(D)  apply the competencies related to resources, information, systems, and technology in appropriate settings and situations; and

(E)  demonstrate knowledge of the concepts and skills related to health and safety in the workplace, as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(2)  The student relates core academic skills to the requirements of mill and cabinetmaking. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate effective verbal and written communication skills with individuals from varied cultures, including fellow workers, managers, and customers;

(B)  complete work orders and related paperwork;

(C)  estimate supplies, materials, and labor costs for work orders;

(D)  apply the principles of mathematics for accurate standard and metric measurements; and

(E)  read and interpret appropriate blueprints, drawings, charts, and diagrams.

(3)  The student knows the concepts and skills that form the core knowledge of mill and cabinetmaking. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate knowledge of cabinetmaking design;

(B)  demonstrate knowledge of the use of woods, fasteners, hardware, glass, and mirrors; and

(C)  demonstrate knowledge of the industrial processes and procedures used in mill and cabinetmaking.

(4)  The student knows the function and application of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in mill and cabinetmaking. The student is expected to:

(A)  use in a safe manner hand and power tools and equipment commonly employed in mill and cabinetmaking;

(B)  handle and dispose of environmentally hazardous materials used in mill and cabinetmaking;

(C)  demonstrate the proper procedures to saw, plane, shape, turn, bore, mortise, and sand various types of woods; and

(D)  demonstrate knowledge of new and emerging technologies that may affect mill and cabinetmaking.

(5)  The student applies the concepts and skills of mill and cabinetmaking to simulated and actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and construct the various joints used in cabinetmaking;

(B)  demonstrate the proper procedures to glue, clamp, laminate, veneer, and inlay wood;

(C)  demonstrate the proper procedures to construct and install cabinet doors, furniture doors, drawers, drawer guides, shelves, cabinet interiors, legs, posts, table tops, and cabinet tops; and

(D)  apply proper finishing techniques.

Source: The provisions of this §130.50 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.51. Masonry Technology I (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Construction. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  Masonry Technology I provides information and techniques related to basic masonry and safety precautions. For safety and liability considerations, limiting course enrollment to 15 students is recommended.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the role of an employee in the construction industry;

(B)  demonstrate critical-thinking skills;

(C)  demonstrate the ability to solve problems using critical-thinking skills;

(D)  demonstrate knowledge of basic computer systems;

(E)  explain common uses for computers in the construction industry;

(F)  define effective relationship skills; and

(G)  recognize workplace issues such as sexual harassment, stress, and substance abuse.

(2)  The student describes materials and techniques used in basic masonry. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain how concrete masonry units (CMUs), or blocks, are used in construction;

(B)  explain how clay masonry units (bricks) are used in construction;

(C)  explain how stone is used in construction;

(D)  describe how mortar and grout are used in masonry construction; and

(E)  describe how wall structures are created using masonry units.

(3)  The student identifies safe practices and expectations for the masonry industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the costs of job accidents;

(B)  identify the causes of job accidents;

(C)  recognize the hazards;

(D)  demonstrate proper housekeeping techniques;

(E)  observe mortar and concrete safety; and

(F)  observe flammable liquid safety.

(4)  The student demonstrates awareness of safe practices and expectations for the masonry industry and recognizes proper personal protective equipment. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain protective lenses and face shields;

(B)  describe hearing protection;

(C)  identify gloves used in the masonry trade; and

(D)  use respirators.

(5)  The student understands the importance of being trained in and aware of safe practices and expectations for the masonry industry, including working safely from elevated surfaces. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain fall protection procedures;

(B)  describe personal fall arrest systems;

(C)  list basic scaffold safety guidelines; and

(D)  explain how to protect against falling objects.

(6)  The student explains safe practices and expectations for the masonry industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the safe use of hand tools;

(B)  demonstrate the safe use of saws;

(C)  explain the safe use of mixers;

(D)  explain the safe use of grinders;

(E)  describe the safe use of powder-actuated tools;

(F)  explain how to work safely around a fork lift;

(G)  list basic electrical safety guidelines;

(H)  explain how to store and stockpile masonry materials safely; and

(I)  demonstrate how to stack brick safely.

(7)  The student identifies masonry hand tools. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate how to use trowels;

(B)  demonstrate how to use hammers and chisels;

(C)  demonstrate how to use jointers and brushes; and

(D)  identify other hand tools used in masonry.

(8)  The student understands the importance of measurements and measuring tools used in masonry. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate how to use the modular spacing rule, brick spacing rule, oversized brick spacing rule, and steel tape measure;

(B)  demonstrate how to use levels;

(C)  demonstrate how to use chalk boxes, squares, plumb-bobs, and laser levels; and

(D)  demonstrate how to use corner poles, lines, and fasteners.

Source: The provisions of this §130.51 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.52. Masonry Technology II (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Masonry Technology I. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  Masonry Technology II is designed to further enhance the skills and knowledge of the beginning masonry student. For safety and liability considerations, limiting course enrollment to 15 students is recommended.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the role of an employee in the construction industry;

(B)  demonstrate critical-thinking skills;

(C)  demonstrate the ability to solve problems using critical-thinking skills;

(D)  demonstrate knowledge of basic computer systems;

(E)  explain common uses for computers in the construction industry;

(F)  define effective relationship skills; and

(G)  recognize workplace issues such as sexual harassment, stress, and substance abuse.

(2)  The student recognizes mathematical concepts used in masonry and is able to apply mathematical concepts used in masonry. The student is expected to:

(A)  read a six-foot rule;

(B)  read other measuring devices;

(C)  read a mason's rule;

(D)  apply the 3-4-5 formula to square a corner;

(E)  recognize modular increments;

(F)  describe how to determine areas and circumferences;

(G)  explain the basic parts of a set of drawings;

(H)  identify lines, symbols, and abbreviations used on drawings;

(I)  explain scales and dimensions used on drawings;

(J)  explain types of construction drawings;

(K)  identify the purpose of specifications, standards, and codes used in the building industry and the sections that pertain to masonry;

(L)  explain the purpose of specifications, standards, and codes; and

(M)  describe the purpose of inspections and testing.

(3)  The student learns to describe the ingredients and types of mortar. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the use of Portland cement, hydrated lime, and sand;

(B)  identify masonry cement;

(C)  explain pre-blended mortars;

(D)  explain the use of water and admixtures;

(E)  list the types of masonry mortars;

(F)  explain the properties of plastic mortar;

(G)  identify the properties of hardened mortar;

(H)  identify the common problems found in mortar application and their solutions;

(I)  describe the effects of improper proportioning and poor-quality materials;

(J)  explain the effects of severe weather and tempering;

(K)  describe efflorescence;

(L)  set up, maintain, and dispose of mortar;

(M)  maintain the mortar mixing area;

(N)  set up a mixing area; and

(O)  mix mortar with a power mixer.

(4)  The student describes how to install concrete masonry units. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the characteristics of concrete masonry units;

(B)  explain how to set up, layout, and bond concrete masonry units;

(C)  explain how to lay and tool concrete masonry units;

(D)  explain how to clean concrete masonry units;

(E)  identify the characteristics of brick;

(F)  demonstrate how to set up, layout, and bond brick;

(G)  demonstrate how to lay and tool brick;

(H)  demonstrate how to clean brick;

(I)  cut with chisels and hammers;

(J)  cut with masonry hammers;

(K)  cut with saws and splitters;

(L)  check units and cuts;

(M)  install masonry reinforcements; and

(N)  install masonry accessories.

Source: The provisions of this §130.52 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.53. Architectural Design I (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Prerequisites: Algebra I and English I. Recommended prerequisites: Geometry, Principles of Architecture, and Principles of Construction. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Architectural Design I, students will gain knowledge and skills needed to enter a career in architecture or construction or prepare a foundation toward a postsecondary degree in architecture, construction science, drafting, interior design, or landscape architecture. Architectural Design I includes the knowledge of the design, design history, techniques, and tools related to the production of drawings, renderings, and scaled models for nonresidential or residential architectural purposes.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify employment opportunities, including entrepreneurship and preparation requirements, in the field of architecture;

(B)  demonstrate an understanding of group participation and leadership related to citizenship and career preparation;

(C)  identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(D)  apply the competencies related to resources, information, systems, and technology in appropriate settings and situations; and

(E)  demonstrate knowledge of the concepts and skills related to health and safety in the workplace, as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(2)  The student applies key cognitive skills and academic behaviors to the requirements of architectural studies. The student is expected to:

(A)  self-monitor learning needs and seek assistance when needed;

(B)  practice study habits necessary to manage academic pursuits and requirements;

(C)  strive for accuracy and precision;

(D)  complete and master tasks;

(E)  demonstrate effective verbal and written communication skills with individuals from varied cultures, including fellow workers, managers, and customers;

(F)  complete work orders and related paperwork;

(G)  estimate jobs, schedules, and practices related to legal restrictions;

(H)  read and interpret appropriate architectural symbols, schematics, blueprints, work drawings, manuals, and bulletins; and

(I)  apply descriptive geometry related to auxiliary views, revolutions, and intersections.

(3)  The student knows the concepts and skills that form the technical knowledge of architectural design. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate knowledge of architectural design principles;

(B)  determine building code and zoning requirements for building types in a selected area; and

(C)  demonstrate knowledge of the various grades and types of construction materials.

(4)  The student knows the function and application of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in architectural drawing. The student is expected to:

(A)  use the tools, materials, and equipment commonly employed in the field of architecture in a safe manner;

(B)  handle and dispose of environmentally hazardous materials; and

(C)  demonstrate knowledge of new and emerging technologies that may affect the field of architecture.

(5)  The student applies the concepts and skills of the profession to simulated or actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  use problem-solving skills to analyze a situation and identify a problem to be solved;

(B)  break a complex problem into component parts that can be analyzed and solved separately;

(C)  strive for accuracy and precision;

(D)  work independently;

(E)  work collaboratively;

(F)  research an architectural project;

(G)  design and present an effective architectural product;

(H)  present a final architectural product for critique;

(I)  apply architectural lettering techniques;

(J)  develop preliminary sketches of a nonresidential or residential architectural design;

(K)  use traditional technical architectural drafting techniques to create drawings;

(L)  demonstrate through drawings the development of maximum efficiency of circulation within areas or rooms;

(M)  develop a site plan using maximum orientation of the building relative to views, sun, and wind direction;

(N)  develop building designs to ensure compatibility between interior and exterior to enhance overall appearance;

(O)  draw schematic site plans, floor plans, building elevations, sections, perspectives, and character sketches from bubble diagrams;

(P)  draw scaled wall thickness plans, elevations, and sections;

(Q)  develop details of floor and wall sections as required;

(R)  demonstrate knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act;

(S)  assemble an architectural design in three dimensions;

(T)  customize screen menus to fit specific problems or needs;

(U)  construct points, lines, and other geometric forms using accepted computer-aided design methods;

(V)  create a freehand simple one-point perspective;

(W)  use a computer system to create a bill of materials;

(X)  use a computer system to create and modify architectural drawings; and

(Y)  plot architectural drawings for presentation.

(6)  The student begins exploration, development, and organization of ideas from the surroundings. The student is expected to:

(A)  begin illustrating ideas for architectural projects from direct observation, experiences, imagination; and

(B)  begin comparing and contrasting the use of architectural elements such as color, texture, form, line, space, value, and architectural principles such as emphasis, pattern, rhythm, balance, proportion, and unity in personal architectural projects and those of others using vocabulary accurately.

(7)  The student begins expressing ideas through original architectural projects using a variety of media with appropriate skill. The student is expected to:

(A)  create beginning visual solutions by elaborating on direct observation, experiences, and imagination;

(B)  create beginning designs for practical applications; and

(C)  demonstrate beginning effective use of architectural media and tools in design, drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture such as model building.

(8)  The student demonstrates an understanding of architectural history and culture as records of human achievement from ancient Egypt to the present. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast historical and contemporary styles, identifying general themes and trends;

(B)  describe general characteristics in architectural projects from a variety of cultures; and

(C)  compare and contrast career opportunities in architecture.

(9)  The student makes beginning informed judgments about personal architectural projects and the architectural projects of others. The student is expected to:

(A)  interpret, evaluate, and justify architectural artistic decisions in personal architectural projects; and

(B)  select and analyze original architectural projects, portfolios, and exhibitions by peers or others to form precise conclusions about formal qualities, historical and cultural contexts, intents, and meanings.

(10)  The student makes informed career decisions that reflect career goals. The student is expected to:

(A)  determine employment and entrepreneurial opportunities and preparation requirements in architecture and related fields;

(B)  propose short-term and long-term career goals;

(C)  describe technology used in architectural careers;

(D)  maintain a project portfolio that documents experience by using graphic or written documentation of architectural-related projects; and

(E)  develop a professional resume.

(11)  The student applies communication, science, and mathematics knowledge and skills to architectural projects. The student is expected to:

(A)  prepare professional communications, technical reports, and presentations;

(B)  apply mathematical equations; and

(C)  apply scientific principles and concepts.

(12)  The student knows the concept of sustainability. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the nature of energy;

(B)  relate potential energy, kinetic energy, and heat energy to conservation;

(C)  create an energy model;

(D)  evaluate different methods of energy transfer;

(E)  recognize sustainable design as it relates to architectural design; and

(F)  define green architecture as related to the field of architecture.

Source: The provisions of this §130.53 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.54. Architectural Design II (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisites: Architectural Design I or Advanced Interior Design and Geometry. Recommended prerequisites: Principles of Architecture and Principles of Construction. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Architectural Design II, students will gain advanced knowledge and skills needed to enter a career in architecture or construction or prepare a foundation toward a postsecondary degree in architecture, construction science, drafting, interior design, or landscape architecture. Architectural Design II includes the advanced knowledge of the design, design history, techniques, and tools related to the production of drawings, renderings, and scaled models for nonresidential or residential architectural purposes.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify employment opportunities, including entrepreneurship and preparation requirements, in the field of architecture;

(B)  demonstrate an understanding of group participation and leadership related to citizenship and career preparation;

(C)  identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(D)  apply the competencies related to resources, information, systems, and technology in appropriate settings and situations; and

(E)  demonstrate knowledge of the concepts and skills related to health and safety in the workplace, as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(2)  The student relates core academic skills to the requirements of architecture. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate effective verbal and written communication skills with individuals from varied cultures, including fellow workers, managers, and customers;

(B)  complete work orders and related paperwork;

(C)  estimate jobs, schedules, and standard industry practices related to legal restrictions;

(D)  read and interpret architectural symbols, schematics, blueprints, work drawings, manuals, and bulletins; and

(E)  apply descriptive geometry related to auxiliary views, revolutions, and intersections.

(3)  The student knows the concepts and skills that form the technical knowledge of architectural computer-aided drafting. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate knowledge of architectural design principles;

(B)  determine building code and zoning requirements for building types in a selected area; and

(C)  demonstrate knowledge of the various grades and types of construction materials.

(4)  The student knows the function and application of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in architectural computer-aided design. The student is expected to:

(A)  use the tools, materials, and equipment commonly employed in the field of architectural computer-aided design in a safe manner;

(B)  handle and dispose of environmentally hazardous materials used in the field of architecture in accordance with the material safety data sheet (MSDS), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations; and

(C)  demonstrate knowledge of new and emerging technologies that may affect the field of architecture.

(5)  The student applies the concepts and skills of the trade to simulated and actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  use problem-solving skills to analyze a situation to identify a problem to be solved;

(B)  break a complex problem into component parts that can be analyzed and solved separately;

(C)  strive for accuracy and precision;

(D)  work independently;

(E)  work collaboratively;

(F)  research an architectural project;

(G)  design and present an effective architectural product;

(H)  present a final architectural product for critique;

(I)  apply architectural lettering techniques;

(J)  develop preliminary sketches of a residential plan or nonresidential plan;

(K)  demonstrate through drawings the development of maximum efficiency of circulation within areas or rooms;

(L)  develop a site plan using maximum orientation of the building relative to views, sun, and wind direction;

(M)  draw building designs and styles to ensure compatibility between interior and exterior to enhance overall appearance;

(N)  draw schematic site plans, floor plans, roof plans, building elevations, sections, perspectives, and character sketches using design development techniques;

(O)  draw scaled wall thickness plans, interior elevations, and sections;

(P)  develop details, sections, floor and wall sections, ceiling and roof sections, door and window sections, and other sections as required;

(Q)  assemble an architectural design in three dimensions;

(R)  research the Green Building Rating System as defined by the U.S. Green Building Council; and

(S)  create a project demonstrating sustainable design as it relates to architectural design as defined by the U.S. Green Building Council.

(6)  The student applies the concepts and skills of the trade to simulated and actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  customize screen menus to fit specific problems or needs;

(B)  construct architectural drawings using advanced computer-aided design drafting skills;

(C)  create two- or three-point perspectives;

(D)  create three-dimensional solid models;

(E)  view three-dimensional objects in several different positions;

(F)  use a computer system to create a bill of materials;

(G)  use a computer-aided drafting system to create and modify nonresidential or residential architectural drawings;

(H)  plot architectural drawings for presentation; and

(I)  render three-dimensional objects with applied materials.

(7)  The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe how teams function;

(B)  use teamwork to solve problems;

(C)  distinguish between the roles of team leaders and team members;

(D)  identify characteristics of good leaders;

(E)  identify employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(F)  define discrimination, harassment, and inequality;

(G)  use time-management techniques to develop and maintain work schedules and meet deadlines; and

(H)  complete work according to established criteria.

(8)  The student sustains exploration, development, and organization of ideas from their surroundings. The student is expected to:

(A)  use advanced skills to illustrate ideas for architectural projects from direct observation, experiences, and imagination; and

(B)  use advanced skills comparing and contrasting the use of architectural elements such as color, texture, form, line, space, and value and architectural principles such as emphasis, pattern, rhythm, balance, proportion, and unity in personal architectural projects and those of others using vocabulary accurately.

(9)  The student uses advanced skills expressing ideas through original architectural projects using a variety of media with appropriate skill. The student is expected to:

(A)  create, using advanced skills, visual solutions by elaborating on direct observation, experiences, and imagination;

(B)  create, using advanced skills, designs for practical applications; and

(C)  demonstrate, using advanced skills, effective use of architectural media and tools in design, drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture such as advanced model building.

(10)  The student demonstrates an understanding of architectural history and culture as records of human achievement by examining the connections between twentieth and twenty-first century architecture and art and connections between Greek and Roman architecture and art. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast historical and contemporary styles by identifying general themes and trends;

(B)  describe general characteristics in architectural artworks from a variety of cultures; and

(C)  compare and contrast career opportunities in architecture.

(11)  The student makes advanced, informed judgments about personal architectural projects and the architectural projects of others. The student is expected to:

(A)  interpret, evaluate, and justify architectural artistic decisions in personal architectural artworks; and

(B)  select and analyze original architectural artworks, portfolios, and exhibitions by peers and others to form precise conclusions about formal qualities, historical and cultural contexts, intents, and meanings.

(12)  The student exhibits employability skills that lead to job success in the architectural design industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(B)  demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(C)  demonstrate positive interpersonal skills, including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership;

(D)  evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and achievement;

(E)  demonstrate appropriate grooming and appearance for the workplace;

(F)  demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette in the workplace;

(G)  exhibit productive work habits and attitudes; and

(H)  maintain a project portfolio that documents architectural projects using a variety of multimedia techniques.

Source: The provisions of this §130.54 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.55. Interior Design I (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Prerequisites: Algebra I and English I. Recommended prerequisites: Principles of Architecture and Principles of Construction or Architectural Design I. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  Interior Design I is a technical course that addresses psychological, physiological, and sociological needs of individuals by enhancing the environments in which they live and work. Students will use knowledge and skills related to interior and exterior environments, construction, and furnishings to make wise consumer decisions, increase productivity, promote sustainability, and compete in industry.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply oral and written communication skills clearly, concisely, convincingly, and effectively to explain and justify actions in a socially acceptable manner that is easily understood by others;

(B)  solve problems using job-appropriate mathematical skills;

(C)  demonstrate an understanding of leadership skills;

(D)  cooperate, contribute, and collaborate as a member of a group;

(E)  exhibit professionalism through dress, speech, and manners that are appropriate to the profession and worksite;

(F)  review accurately both quantitative and qualitative work processes and end products;

(G)  follow written and oral instructions and adhere to established practices, policies, and procedures, including health and safety rules; and

(H)  use and apply task- and job-appropriate computer applications such as printing and plotting elevations, floor plans, and additional presentation documents or illustrations.

(2)  The student demonstrates effective decision-making skills related to housing needs throughout the life cycle. The student is expected to:

(A)  determine housing characteristics common to various world cultures and regions such as roof styles and materials, foundation types, and construction materials;

(B)  describe factors affecting housing choices;

(C)  describe the relationship between family housing and economics;

(D)  assess the impact of demographic trends on psychological, physiological, and social needs when making housing decisions;

(E)  analyze the impact of housing decisions on family relationships and the management of multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles;

(F)  analyze aspects of community planning that impact housing decisions; and

(G)  compare the availability, desirability, and financial feasibility of housing alternatives.

(3)  The student demonstrates effective management practices related to the housing budget. The student is expected to:

(A)  research consumer rights and responsibilities associated with housing;

(B)  contrast the impact of needs and wants on the costs of housing;

(C)  analyze legal and financial aspects of purchasing, leasing, and renting housing; and

(D)  summarize laws and public policies that impact housing decisions and costs.

(4)  The student recommends practices that will create a safe, secure, and well-maintained home. The student is expected to:

(A)  research the effect of housing conditions on health, safety, and the environment;

(B)  develop a plan for detecting safety hazards and maintaining a safe home; and

(C)  research and describe housing features for individuals with special needs.

(5)  The student proposes methods to create quality living environments. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply elements and principles of design to living environments;

(B)  apply principles of space utilization, zoning, and traffic patterns in planning and furnishing housing; and

(C)  propose design and furnishings features to meet the special needs of individuals and families.

(6)  The student considers factors affecting housing construction when making plans and consumer decisions related to housing. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify architectural styles and architectural features exemplified in housing;

(B)  summarize considerations for housing site selection;

(C)  evaluate basic housing construction and finishing considerations; and

(D)  research and describe the effects of technology on current and future housing trends.

(7)  The student evaluates factors influencing the housing industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  research and describe the interrelationship of the housing industry with the economy; and

(B)  determine sources and availability of construction materials.

(8)  The student assesses environmental issues affecting housing. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate the effects of landscaping on housing and the environment; and

(B)  determine techniques, materials, and technological applications that can be used in housing to conserve energy and other resources and promote sustainability.

(9)  The student uses effective design practices to evaluate residential and nonresidential interiors. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply elements and principles of design to interiors;

(B)  plan for effective use of space zones and placement of furnishings;

(C)  apply drafting techniques, including scaled drawings that facilitate space planning and technological applications;

(D)  determine the effect of technological applications on interior design practices;

(E)  differentiate design practices to meet individual, business, and special needs;

(F)  research energy conservation and sustainability practices that affect interior design; and

(G)  summarize laws, public policies, and regulations impacting interior environments.

(10)  The student determines appropriate lighting for residential and nonresidential interiors. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the functions and principles of lighting;

(B)  compare lighting types and methods of control; and

(C)  recommend lighting applications for specific interior needs, including safety, conservation, and sustainability.

(11)  The student chooses appropriate background materials to complement various residential and nonresidential interior settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare criteria for selection, use, and care of floor coverings;

(B)  evaluate selection, use, and care of wall treatments;

(C)  evaluate selection and care of ceilings; and

(D)  evaluate selection, use, and care of window treatments and their suitability for various window types.

(12)  The student demonstrates effective decision-making skills in applying principles of design and space to residential and nonresidential interior environments. The student is expected to:

(A)  examine the relationship of interior decisions to individual and family needs and wants;

(B)  examine the influences of demographics, society, and culture on interior design decisions;

(C)  explain the relationship of local and global economics to interior environments;

(D)  propose strategies for controlling costs and allocating resources; and

(E)  budget for acquisition of products to enhance interior environments.

(13)  The student evaluates the role of furniture in interior design for residential and nonresidential settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  distinguish between various characteristics of period styles throughout history;

(B)  determine the influence of period styles on interior design throughout history;

(C)  summarize selection and care of quality furniture;

(D)  assess aesthetic and functional aspects of furniture, including ergonomics and special needs requirements; and

(E)  research and describe the impact of technology on furniture, including current trends.

(14)  The student determines the role of appliances in interior design for residential and nonresidential settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the functional and aesthetic aspects of appliances;

(B)  determine the process for selection of appliances, including consideration of special needs;

(C)  research and explain the safe use and care of appliances, including current trends; and

(D)  research technological advancements in appliances.

(15)  The student evaluates the role of accessories in interior design for residential and nonresidential settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify types of accessories, including eco-friendly accessories;

(B)  describe criteria for selection of accessories;

(C)  analyze care of accessories;

(D)  demonstrate a knowledge of arranging accessories; and

(E)  research eco-friendly options for accessories.

(16)  The student applies the concepts and skills of the industry to simulated work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  customize screen menus to fit specific problems or needs;

(B)  construct points, lines, and other geometric forms using accepted computer-aided design methods;

(C)  create a freehand, simple one-point perspective;

(D)  use applications to create a bill of materials, including budgeting considerations;

(E)  use technological applications to create and modify architectural interior drawings; and

(F)  print and plot architectural interior drawings for presentation.

(17)  The student creates a professional portfolio featuring original projects using a variety of media. The student is expected to:

(A)  illustrate ideas for interior design from direct observation, experiences, and imagination;

(B)  compare and contrast the use of interior design elements and principles in personal design plans and design plans of others using industry terminology;

(C)  create visual solutions by elaborating on direct observation, experience, and imagination;

(D)  create designs for practical applications; and

(E)  demonstrate effective use of interior design media and tools in designing, drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture making such as model building.

(18)  The student maintains a professional portfolio to document knowledge, skills, and abilities. The student is expected to:

(A)  select educational and work history highlights to create a personal resume;

(B)  develop a resume using word processing technology;

(C)  contact professional references to acquire recommendations;

(D)  obtain appropriate letters of recommendation; and

(E)  document and maintain a record of work experiences, licenses, certifications, credentials, and education and training to build a portfolio.

(19)  The student applies the concepts and skills of the profession to simulated or actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  use problem-solving skills to analyze a situation and to identify a problem to be solved;

(B)  break a complex problem into component parts that can be analyzed and solved separately;

(C)  strive for accuracy and precision;

(D)  work independently;

(E)  work collaboratively;

(F)  research an interior design project;

(G)  design and present an effective interior design product; and

(H)  present a final interior design product for critique that demonstrates clear and effective communication.

Source: The provisions of this §130.55 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.56. Interior Design II (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisites: English II, Geometry, and Interior Design I. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  Interior Design II is a technical laboratory course that includes the application of the employability characteristics, principles, processes, technologies, communication, tools, equipment, and materials related to interior design to meet industry standards.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply oral and written communication skills clearly, concisely, convincingly, and effectively to explain and justify actions in a socially acceptable manner that is easily understood by others;

(B)  problem-solve using job-appropriate mathematical skills;

(C)  demonstrate an understanding of leadership skills;

(D)  cooperate, contribute, and collaborate as a member of a group;

(E)  exhibit professionalism through dress, speech, and manners that are appropriate to the profession and worksite;

(F)  review quantitative and qualitative work processes and end products;

(G)  follow written and oral instructions and adhere to established practices, policies, and procedures, including health and safety rules; and

(H)  use and apply job-appropriate computer applications for the given task such as printing and plotting elevations, floor plans, and additional presentation documents or illustrations.

(2)  The student knows the employability characteristics of a successful worker in the modern workplace. The student is expected to:

(A)  research employment opportunities, including internship, entrepreneurship, and preparation requirements, in the field of architectural interior design;

(B)  demonstrate an understanding of group participation and leadership related to citizenship and career preparation;

(C)  research employers' expectations and appropriate work habits;

(D)  apply the competencies related to resources, information, systems, and technology in appropriate settings and situations;

(E)  demonstrate knowledge of the concepts and skills related to health and safety in the workplace, as specified by appropriate governmental regulations; and

(F)  maintain a project portfolio that documents interior design projects using a variety of multimedia techniques with a professional resume reflecting current trends.

(3)  The student applies core academic skills to the requirements of architectural interior design. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate effective verbal and written communication skills with individuals from varied cultures, including fellow workers, managers, and customers;

(B)  complete work orders and related paperwork;

(C)  estimate cost of supplies, materials, and labor; and

(D)  read and interpret schematics, floor plans, work drawings, catalogs, manuals, and bulletins.

(4)  The student knows the concepts and skills that form the core knowledge of architectural interior design. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate knowledge of interior design theory;

(B)  apply layout and design lines, symbols, and drawings;

(C)  demonstrate knowledge of the theory and use of color in interior design; and

(D)  demonstrate knowledge of the principles of computer-aided drafting.

(5)  The student knows the function and application of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in architectural interior design. The student is expected to:

(A)  use tools, materials, and equipment commonly employed in the field of architectural interior design in a safe manner;

(B)  demonstrate an understanding of how to properly handle and dispose of environmentally hazardous materials used in the field of architectural interior design in accordance with the material safety data sheet (MSDS), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations; and

(C)  demonstrate knowledge of new and emerging technologies that may affect the field of architectural interior design.

(6)  The student applies the concepts and skills of interior design to simulated and actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply architectural lettering techniques;

(B)  render freehand nonresidential or residential interior design working drawings;

(C)  draw a single-line floor plan from design development techniques for a residential or nonresidential project;

(D)  select interior furnishings and finish materials for a residence or a nonresidential office interior;

(E)  prepare and draw dimension plans for construction documents;

(F)  produce interior drawings using one-point and two-point perspective;

(G)  develop and complete schematic design drawings;

(H)  apply the essential knowledge and skills in architectural interior design to career preparation learning experiences, including job shadowing, mentoring, or apprenticeship training programs;

(I)  create an original, sustainable design as it relates to interior design;

(J)  customize screen menus in drawing programs; and

(K)  apply industry-accepted, computer-aided drafting skills.

(7)  The student uses valid and reliable research strategies to determine current industry standards. The student is expected to:

(A)  research and define green architecture as related to the field of interior design;

(B)  research the Americans with Disabilities Act;

(C)  research the guidelines for kitchen and bath design as defined by The National Kitchen and Bath Industry (NKBA);

(D)  research traditional and period design styles of upholstery;

(E)  research new and emerging technologies that may affect the field of furniture repair and upholstery services;

(F)  research the types, properties, and uses of paints, varnishes, polishes, and waxes; and

(G)  research an architectural project such as urban renewal, green architecture, or innovative design.

(8)  The student understands the concepts and skills that form the core knowledge of furniture repair and upholstery. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify styles and periods of furniture;

(B)  identify the various types and properties of woods; and

(C)  identify different fabrics, materials, and finishes and their characteristics.

(9)  The student knows the function and application of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in furniture repair and upholstery. The student is expected to:

(A)  use tools, materials, and equipment commonly employed in the field of furniture repair and upholstery services; and

(B)  handle and dispose of environmentally hazardous materials used in the field of furniture repair and upholstery.

(10)  The student applies the concepts and skills of furniture repair and upholstery to simulated and actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply the woodworking skills required for furniture finishing and repair;

(B)  demonstrate knowledge of the types, properties, and uses of paints, varnishes, polishes, and waxes;

(C)  disassemble and reassemble furniture;

(D)  repair dents, marks, and scratches by using fillers and stains;

(E)  perform the tasks of fabrication and repair and disassembly and reassembly such as tacking, nailing, gluing, measuring, layout, cutting, sewing, and fitting materials;

(F)  apply materials to furniture such as filling, padding, springs, and fabric;

(G)  use problem-solving skills to analyze a situation to identify a problem to be solved;

(H)  break a complex problem into component parts that can be separately analyzed and solved;

(I)  strive for accuracy and precision;

(J)  work independently;

(K)  work collaboratively;

(L)  design and present an effective interior design product; and

(M)  present a final interior design product for critique that demonstrates clear and effective communication.

Source: The provisions of this §130.56 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.57. Electrical Technology I (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Architecture or Principles of Construction. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Electrical Technology I, students will gain knowledge and skills needed to enter the workforce as an electrician or building maintenance supervisor, prepare for a postsecondary degree in a specified field of construction or construction management, or pursue an approved apprenticeship program. Students will acquire knowledge and skills in safety, electrical theory, tools, codes, installation of electrical equipment, and the reading of electrical drawings, schematics, and specifications.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify job opportunities with their accompanying job duties such as electrician, building maintenance technician, manager, and electrical engineer; and

(B)  research career pathways, including education, job skills, and experience required to achieve that pathway.

(2)  The student identifies the issues associated with electrical hazards found on a jobsite. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate safe working procedures in a construction environment;

(B)  explain the purpose of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and how it promotes safety on the job;

(C)  identify electrical hazards and how to avoid or minimize them in the workplace; and

(D)  explain safety issues concerning lockout and tagout procedures, personal protection using assured grounding and isolation programs, confined space entry, respiratory protection, and fall protection.

(3)  The student learns conduit bending and installation. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the methods of hand bending conduit;

(B)  identify the various methods used to install conduit;

(C)  use mathematical formulas to determine conduit bends;

(D)  make 90 degree bends, back-to-back bends, offsets, kicks, and saddle bends using a hand bender; and

(E)  cut, ream, and thread conduit.

(4)  The student gains knowledge of the hardware and systems used by an electrician to mount and support boxes, receptacles, and other electrical components. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and explain the use of threaded fasteners;

(B)  identify and explain the use of non-threaded fasteners;

(C)  identify and explain the use of anchors;

(D)  demonstrate the correct applications for fasteners and anchors; and

(E)  install fasteners and anchors.

(5)  The student learns the electrical concepts used in Ohm's law applied to direct current and series circuits and understands series parallel circuits, resistive circuits, Kirchhoff's voltage and current laws, and circuit analysis. The student is expected to:

(A)  recognize what atoms are and what atoms are composed of;

(B)  define voltage and identify the ways in which it can be produced;

(C)  explain the difference between conductors and insulators;

(D)  define the units of measurement used to measure the properties of electricity;

(E)  explain how voltage, current, and resistance are related to each other;

(F)  calculate an unknown value using the formula for Ohm's law;

(G)  explain the different types of meters used to measure voltage, current, and resistance;

(H)  calculate the amount of power used by a circuit using the power formula;

(I)  explain the basic characteristics of a series, parallel, and combined series-parallel circuit;

(J)  calculate, using Kirchhoff's current law, the total current in parallel and series-parallel circuits; and

(K)  find the total amount of resistance in a series, parallel, or combined series-parallel circuit.

(6)  The student gains knowledge in selecting, using, and safely maintaining common electrical test equipment. The student is expect to:

(A)  explain how to operate test equipment such as ammeter, ohmmeter, volt-ohm-multimeter, continuity tester, and voltage tester;

(B)  explain how to read specific test equipment and convert from one scale to another when using specified test equipment;

(C)  explain the importance of proper meter polarity; and

(D)  explain the difference between digital and analog meters.

(7)  The student uses the National Electrical Code. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the purpose and history of the National Electrical Code;

(B)  describe the layout of and explain how to navigate the National Electrical Code;

(C)  describe the purpose of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association and National Fire Protection Association; and

(D)  explain the role of testing laboratories.

(8)  The student learns the types and applications of raceways, wireways, and ducts. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe various types of cable trays and raceways;

(B)  identify and select various types and sizes of raceways;

(C)  identify and select various types and sizes of cable raceways;

(D)  identify and select various types of raceway fittings;

(E)  identify various methods used to install raceways;

(F)  demonstrate knowledge of National Electrical Code raceway requirements;

(G)  describe procedures for installing raceways and boxes on masonry surfaces, metal stud systems, wood-framed systems, and drywall surfaces; and

(H)  recognize safety precautions that must be followed when working with boxes and raceways.

(9)  The student learns the types and applications of conductors and wiring techniques. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate the various wire sizes using a wire in accordance with American Wire Gauge standards;

(B)  identify insulation and jacket types according to conditions and applications;

(C)  describe voltage ratings of conductors and cables;

(D)  read and identify markings on conductors and cables;

(E)  use the tables in the National Electrical Code to determine the ampacity of a conductor;

(F)  state the purpose of stranded wire;

(G)  state the purpose of compressed conductors;

(H)  describe the different materials from which conductors are made;

(I)  describe the different types of conductor insulation;

(J)  describe the color coding of insulation;

(K)  describe instrumentation control wiring;

(L)  describe the equipment required for pulling wire through conduit;

(M)  describe the procedure for pulling wire through conduit;

(N)  install conductors in conduit; and

(O)  pull conductors in a conduit system.

(10)  The student learns electrical symbols and their use in design drawings. Additionally, students learn to interpret schematics, one-line diagrams, and wiring diagrams. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the basic layout of a design drawing;

(B)  describe the information included in the title block of a drawing;

(C)  identify common symbols and the various types of lines used on drawings;

(D)  understand the use of architect's and engineer's scales;

(E)  interpret electrical drawings such as site plans, floor plans, and detail drawings;

(F)  read equipment schedules found on electrical drawings; and

(G)  describe the type of information included in electrical specifications.

(11)  The student learns the electrical devices and wiring techniques used in commercial and industrial construction and maintenance. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and state the functions and ratings of special switches such as single-pole, double-pole, three-way, four-way, dimmer, and safety switches;

(B)  explain National Electrical Manufacturers Association classifications as they relate to switches and enclosures;

(C)  explain the National Electrical Building Code requirements concerning wiring devices;

(D)  identify and state the functions and ratings of wiring devices such as straight blade, twist lock, and pin and sleeve receptacles;

(E)  identify and define receptacle terminals and disconnects;

(F)  identify and define ground fault circuit interrupters;

(G)  explain the box mounting requirements in the National Building Code;

(H)  use appropriate tools and connectors to strip and splice wires together;

(I)  identify and state the functions of limit switches and relays; and

(J)  identify and state the function of switchgear.

(12)  The student learns the electrical devices and wiring techniques used in residential construction maintenance. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe how to determine electric service requirements for dwellings;

(B)  explain the grounding requirements of a residential electric service;

(C)  calculate and select service-entrance equipment;

(D)  select the proper wiring methods for various types of residences;

(E)  explain the role of the National Electrical Code in residential wiring;

(F)  compute branch circuit loads and explain their installation requirements;

(G)  explain the types and purposes of equipment grounding conductors;

(H)  explain the purpose of ground-fault circuit interrupters and tell where they must be installed;

(I)  determine the size of outlet boxes and select the proper type for different wiring methods;

(J)  describe rules for installing electric space heating and heating, ventilating, and air conditioning equipment;

(K)  describe the installation rules for electrical systems around swimming pools, spas, and hot tubs;

(L)  describe the installation and control of lighting fixtures; and

(M)  explain how wiring devices are selected and installed.

Source: The provisions of this §130.57 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.58. Electrical Technology II (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Electrical Technology I. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Architecture or Principles of Construction. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Electrical Technology II, students will gain advanced knowledge and skills needed to enter the workforce as an electrician, a building maintenance technician, or a supervisor; prepare for a postsecondary degree in a specified field of construction or construction management; or pursue an approved apprenticeship program. Students will acquire knowledge and skills in safety, electrical theory, tools, codes, installation of electrical equipment, alternating current and direct current motors, conductor installation, installation of electrical services, and electric lighting installation.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify job opportunities with their accompanying job duties such as electrician, building maintenance technician, manager, and electrical engineer; and

(B)  research careers along with the education, job skills, and experience required to achieve a career goal.

(2)  The student knows the issues associated with electrical hazards found on a jobsite. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate safe working procedures in a construction environment;

(B)  explain the purpose of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and how it promotes safety on the job;

(C)  identify electrical hazards and how to avoid or minimize them in the workplace; and

(D)  explain safety issues concerning lockout and tagout procedures, personal protection using assured grounding and isolation programs, confined space entry, respiratory protection, and fall protection.

(3)  The student gains knowledge of alternating current and direct current motors with specific attention being given to main parts, circuits, and connections. The student is expected to:

(A)  define terms such as ampacity, branch circuit, circuit breaker, controller, duty, full-load amps, ground fault circuit interrupter, interrupting rating, motor circuit switch, thermal protector, National Electrical Manufacturers Association design letter, non-automatic, overcurrent, overload, rated full-load speed, rated horsepower, remote control circuit, service factor, and thermal cutout;

(B)  describe the various types of motor enclosures;

(C)  describe how the rated voltage of a motor differs from the system voltage;

(D)  describe the basic construction and components of a three-phase squirrel cage induction motor;

(E)  explain the relationships among speed, frequency, and the number of poles in a three-phase induction motor;

(F)  describe how torque is developed in an induction motor;

(G)  explain how and why torque varies with rotor reactance and slip;

(H)  define percent slip and speed regulation;

(I)  explain how the direction of a three-phase motor is reversed;

(J)  describe the component parts and operating characteristics of a three-phase wound-rotor induction motor;

(K)  define torque, starting current, and armature reaction as they apply to direct current motors;

(L)  explain how the direction of rotation of a direct current motor is changed;

(M)  describe the design and characteristics of direct current shunt, series, and compound motors;

(N)  describe dual-voltage motors and their applications;

(O)  describe the methods for determining various motor connections; and

(P)  describe general motor protection requirements as delineated by the National Electrical Code.

(4)  The student learns the purpose for grounding and bonding electrical systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the purpose of grounding and the scope of the National Electrical Code;

(B)  distinguish between a short circuit and a ground fault;

(C)  define the National Electrical Code ground-related terms;

(D)  distinguish between system grounding and equipment grounding;

(E)  use the National Electrical Code to size the grounding electrode conductor for various alternating current systems;

(F)  explain the National Electrical Code requirements for the installation and physical protection of grounding electrode conductors;

(G)  explain the function of the grounding electrode system and determine which grounding electrodes must be used;

(H)  define electrodes and explain the resistance requirements for electrodes using the National Electrical Code;

(I)  use the National Electrical Code to size the equipment grounding conductor for raceways and equipment;

(J)  explain the function of the main bonding jumper and system bonding jumpers in the grounding system and size the bonding jumpers for various applications;

(K)  size the main bonding jumper for a service using multiple service disconnecting means;

(L)  explain the National Electrical Code requirements for bonding of enclosures and equipment;

(M)  explain effective grounding and its importance in clearing ground faults and short circuits;

(N)  explain the purposes of the grounded conductor neutral in operation of overcurrent devices;

(O)  explain the National Electrical Code requirements for grounding separately derived systems, including transformers and generators;

(P)  explain the National Electrical Code requirements for grounding at more than one building; and

(Q)  explain the National Electrical Code grounding requirements for systems over 600 volts.

(5)  The student properly bends all sizes of conduit up to six inches. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the process of conduit bending using power tools;

(B)  identify all parts of popular electric and hydraulic benders;

(C)  avoid excessive waste when working with conduit systems;

(D)  bend offsets, kicks, saddles, and segmented and parallel bends;

(E)  explain the requirements for the National Electrical Code for bending conduit;

(F)  compute the radius, degrees in bend, developed length, and gain for conduit up to six inches; and

(G)  explain how to correct damaged conduit and modify existing bends.

(6)  The student learns to select and size outlet boxes, pull boxes, and junction boxes. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the different types of nonmetallic and metallic boxes;

(B)  calculate the required box size for any number and size of conductors;

(C)  explain the National Electrical Code regulations for volume required per conductor in outlet boxes;

(D)  locate, install, and support boxes of all types;

(E)  describe the National Electrical Code regulations governing pull and junction boxes;

(F)  explain the radius rule when installing conductors in pull boxes;

(G)  understand the National Electrical Code requirements for boxes supporting lighting fixtures;

(H)  describe the purpose of conduit bodies and Type FS boxes;

(I)  install the different types of fittings used in conjunction with boxes;

(J)  describe the installation rules for boxes and fittings in hazardous areas;

(K)  explain how boxes and fittings are selected and installed; and

(L)  describe the various types of box supports.

(7)  The student knows transportation, storage, and setup of cable reels, methods of rigging, and procedures to complete cable pulls in raceways and cable trays. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the various methods of installing conductors in conduit;

(B)  plan and set up for a cable pull;

(C)  describe how cable reels are transported to the pulling site;

(D)  set up reel stands and spindles for a wire-pulling installation;

(E)  explain how mandrels, swabs, and brushes are used to prepare conduit for conductors;

(F)  install a pull line for a cable-pulling operation;

(G)  explain the operation of power fish tape systems;

(H)  prepare the ends of conductors for pulling;

(I)  describe the types of cable pullers;

(J)  describe the process of high-force cable pulling;

(K)  explain how to support conductors in vertical conduit runs;

(L)  describe the installation of cables in cable trays;

(M)  explain the importance of communication during a cable-pulling operation; and

(N)  calculate the probable stress or tension in cable pulls.

(8)  The student installs cable trays and modifies cable trays and cable. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the components that make up a cable tray assembly;

(B)  explain the methods used to hang and secure a cable tray;

(C)  describe how cable enters and exits cable trays;

(D)  select the proper cable tray fitting for the situation;

(E)  explain the National Electrical Manufacturers Association standards for cable tray installations;

(F)  explain the National Electrical Code requirements for cable tray installations;

(G)  select the required fittings to ensure equipment grounding continuity in cable tray systems;

(H)  interpret electrical working drawings showing cable tray fittings;

(I)  size a cable tray for the number and type of conductors contained in the system;

(J)  select rollers and sheaves for pulling cable in specific cable tray situations; and

(K)  designate the required locations of rollers and sheaves for a specific cable pull.

(9)  The student knows the methods of terminating and splicing conductors of all types and sizes and the preparation and taping of conductors. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe how to make a good conductor termination;

(B)  prepare cable ends for terminations and splices;

(C)  install lugs and connectors onto conductors;

(D)  train cable at termination points;

(E)  explain the role of the National Electrical Code in making cable terminations and splices;

(F)  explain why mechanical stress should be avoided at cable termination points;

(G)  describe the importance of using proper bolt torque when bolting lugs onto bus bars;

(H)  describe crimping techniques;

(I)  select the proper lug or connector for the job;

(J)  describe splicing techniques; and

(K)  explain how to use hand and power crimping tools.

(10)  The student installs single- and three-phase services, including metering equipment. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe various types of electric services for commercial and industrial installations;

(B)  read electrical drawings and diagrams describing service installation;

(C)  calculate and select service-entrance equipment;

(D)  explain the role of the National Electrical Code in service installations;

(E)  install main disconnect switches, panel boards, and overcurrent protection devices;

(F)  identify the circuit loads, number of circuits required, and installation requirements for distribution panels;

(G)  explain the types and purposes of service grounding;

(H)  explain the purpose and required locations of ground fault circuit interrupters;

(I)  describe single-phase service connections; and

(J)  describe both wye-phase and delta-connected three-phase services.

(11)  The student knows the practical application of fuses and circuit breakers. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the necessity of overcurrent protection devices in electrical circuits;

(B)  define the terms associated with fuses and circuit breakers;

(C)  describe the operation of a circuit breaker;

(D)  select the most suitable overcurrent device for the application;

(E)  describe the operation of single-element and time-delay fuses;

(F)  explain how ground fault circuit interrupters can save lives;

(G)  calculate short circuit currents; and

(H)  describe troubleshooting and maintenance techniques for overcurrent devices.

(12)  The student knows the practical applications of contactors and relays. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the operating principles of contactors and relays;

(B)  select contactors and relays for use in specific electrical systems;

(C)  explain how mechanical contactors operate;

(D)  explain how solid-state contactors operate;

(E)  install contactors and relays according to National Electrical Code requirements;

(F)  select and install contactors and relays for lighting control;

(G)  describe how overload relays operate;

(H)  connect a simple control circuit; and

(I)  test control circuits.

(13)  The student learns the basic principles of human vision and the characteristics of light. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain how the human eye works;

(B)  describe the characteristics of light;

(C)  recognize the different kinds of lamps and explain the advantages and disadvantages of each type, including incandescent, halogen, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge;

(D)  select and install lamps into lighting fixtures; and

(E)  recognize and install various types of lighting fixtures, including surface mounted, recessed, suspended, and track-mounted units.

Source: The provisions of this §130.58 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.59. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Refrigeration Technology I (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Architecture, Principles of Construction, or Construction Technology I. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Refrigeration Technology I, students will gain knowledge and skills needed to enter the industry as technicians in the HVAC and refrigeration industry or building maintenance industry, prepare for a postsecondary degree in a specified field of construction management, or pursue an approved apprenticeship program. Students will acquire knowledge and skills in safety, principles of HVAC theory, use of tools, codes, and installation of HVAC and refrigeration equipment.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify job opportunities with their accompanying job duties in occupations such as electrician, building maintenance technician or manager, and electrical engineer; and

(B)  research career pathways along with the education, job skills, and experience required to achieve a career goal.

(2)  The student learns the basic principles of HVAC and refrigeration. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the basic principles of HVAC;

(B)  describe what the Clean Air Act means to the HVAC and refrigeration industry; and

(C)  identify the types of schedules and drawings used by the HVAC and refrigeration industry.

(3)  The student applies knowledge and skills in mathematics as they relate to HVAC and the principles of refrigeration. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify similar units of measurement in both English and the International System (SI) of units;

(B)  calculate and convert measured values and volumes expressed in mathematical equations and formulas; and

(C)  convert temperature values between Celsius and Fahrenheit.

(4)  The student selects, prepares, connects, and installs copper and plastic piping and fittings. The student is expected to:

(A)  state the precautions that must be taken when installing refrigerant piping;

(B)  select, cut, and bend the right copper tubing for the job;

(C)  safely connect tubing, using flare and compression fittings;

(D)  determine the correct hardware and supports needed for refrigerant pipe installations;

(E)  describe the basic requirements needed to identify and install various types of plastic pipe and state their uses;

(F)  demonstrate various methods used to pressure test HVAC systems;

(G)  identify types of plastic pipe and state their uses; and

(H)  cut and join lengths of plastic pipe.

(5)  The student cuts, threads, and joins ferrous piping. The student is expected to:

(A)  assemble and operate the tools used for soldering;

(B)  prepare tubing and fittings for soldering;

(C)  identify the purposes and uses of solder and solder fluxes;

(D)  solder copper tubing fittings;

(E)  assemble and operate the tools used for brazing;

(F)  prepare tubing and fittings for brazing;

(G)  identify the purposes and uses of filler metals and fluxes used for brazing;

(H)  braze copper tubing and fittings;

(I)  identify the inert gases that can be used safely to purge tubing when brazing;

(J)  identify the types of ferrous metal pipes;

(K)  accurately measure the sizes of ferrous metal pipes;

(L)  identify the common malleable iron fittings;

(M)  cut, ream, and thread ferrous metal pipe;

(N)  join lengths of threaded pipe together and install fittings;

(O)  describe the main points to consider when installing pipe runs; and

(P)  describe the methods used to join grooved piping.

(6)  The student knows electrical principles, power generation and distribution, electrical components, direct current circuits, and electrical safety. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain how electrical power is distributed;

(B)  describe how voltage, current, resistance, and power are related;

(C)  calculate the current, voltage, and resistance in a circuit using Ohm's law;

(D)  calculate how much power is consumed by a circuit using the power formula;

(E)  describe the differences between series and parallel circuits and calculate loads in each;

(F)  describe the purpose and operation of the various electrical components used in HVAC equipment;

(G)  state and demonstrate the safety precautions that must be followed when working on electrical equipment;

(H)  make voltage, current, and resistance measurements using electrical test equipment; and

(I)  read and interpret common electrical symbols.

(7)  The student learns the principles of heat transfer, refrigeration, pressure temperature relationships, and the components and accessories used in air conditioning systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain how heat transfer occurs in a cooling system, demonstrating an understanding of the terms and concepts used in the refrigeration cycle;

(B)  calculate the temperature and pressure relationships at key points in the refrigeration cycle;

(C)  under supervision, use temperature- and pressure-measuring instruments to make readings at key points in the refrigeration cycle;

(D)  identify commonly used refrigerants and demonstrate the procedures for handling these refrigerants;

(E)  identify the major components of a cooling system and explain how each type works;

(F)  identify the major accessories available for cooling systems and explain how each works;

(G)  identify the control devices used in cooling systems and explain how each works; and

(H)  demonstrate the correct methods to be used when piping a refrigeration system.

(8)  The student learns heating fundamentals, types and designs of furnaces and their components, and basic procedures for installing and servicing furnaces. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the three methods by which heat is transferred and give an example of each;

(B)  describe how combustion occurs and identify the by-products of combustion;

(C)  identify the various types of fuels used in heating;

(D)  identify the major components and accessories of an induced draft and condensing gas furnace and explain the function of each component;

(E)  describe the factors that must be considered when installing a furnace;

(F)  identify the major components of a gas furnace and describe how each works;

(G)  use a manometer under supervision to measure and adjust manifold pressure on a gas furnace;

(H)  identify the major components of an oil furnace and describe how each component works; and

(I)  perform furnace preventive maintenance procedures such as cleaning and filter replacement under supervision.

(9)  The student gains knowledge and skills related to air distribution systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the airflow and pressures in a basic forced-air distribution system;

(B)  explain the differences between propeller and centrifugal fans and blowers;

(C)  identify the various types of duct systems and explain why and where each type is used;

(D)  demonstrate or explain the installation of metal, fiberboard, and flexible duct;

(E)  demonstrate or explain the installation of fittings and transitions used in duct systems;

(F)  demonstrate or explain the use and installation of diffusers, registers, and grilles used in duct systems;

(G)  demonstrate or explain the use and installation of dampers used in duct systems;

(H)  demonstrate or explain the use and installation of insulation and vapor barriers used in duct systems;

(I)  identify the instruments used to make measurements in air systems and explain the use of each instrument; and

(J)  make accurate temperature, air pressure, and velocity measurements in an air distribution system.

Source: The provisions of this §130.59 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.60. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Refrigeration Technology II (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Refrigeration Technology I. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Architecture or Principles of Construction. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Refrigeration Technology II, students will gain advanced knowledge and skills needed to enter the industry as HVAC and refrigeration technicians or building maintenance technicians or supervisors, prepare for a postsecondary degree in a specified field of construction or construction management, or pursue an approved apprenticeship program. Students will acquire knowledge and skills in safety, electrical theory, use of tools, codes, installation of commercial HVAC equipment, heat pumps, troubleshooting techniques, various duct systems, and maintenance practices.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify job opportunities with their accompanying job duties in occupations such as electrician, building maintenance technician or manager, and electrical engineer; and

(B)  research career pathways along with the education, job skills, and experience required to achieve a career goal.

(2)  The student learns the principles of commercial air systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the differences between types of commercial air systems;

(B)  identify the type of building in which a particular type of system is used; and

(C)  explain the typical range of capacities for a commercial air system.

(3)  The student knows the principles of venting fossil-fuel furnaces and the proper methods for selecting and installing vent systems for gas-fired heating equipment. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the principles of combustion and explain complete and incomplete combustion;

(B)  describe the content of flue gas and explain how it is vented;

(C)  identify the components of a furnace vent system;

(D)  describe how to select and install a vent system;

(E)  perform the adjustments necessary to achieve proper combustion in a gas furnace;

(F)  describe the techniques for venting different types of furnaces;

(G)  explain the various draft control devices used with natural-draft furnaces;

(H)  calculate the size of a vent required for a given application; and

(I)  adjust a thermostat heat anticipator.

(4)  The student gains knowledge of hot water heating systems, focusing on safe operation of the low-pressure boiler and piping systems commonly used in residential applications. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the terms and concepts used when working with hot-water heating;

(B)  identify the major components of hot-water heating;

(C)  explain the purpose of each component of hot-water heating;

(D)  demonstrate the safety precautions used when working with hot-water systems;

(E)  demonstrate how to operate selected hot-water systems;

(F)  demonstrate how to safely perform selected operating procedures on low-pressure systems;

(G)  identify the common piping configurations used with hot-water heating;

(H)  explain how to read the pressure across a water system circulating pump;

(I)  calculate heating water flow rates; and

(J)  select a pump for a given application.

(5)  The student learns the basic principles, processes, and devices used to control humidity and air clean-lines as well as devices used to conserve energy in HVAC systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain why it is important to control humidity in a building;

(B)  recognize the various kinds of humidifiers used with HVAC systems and explain why each is used;

(C)  demonstrate how to install and service the humidifiers used in HVAC systems;

(D)  recognize the kinds of air filters used with HVAC systems and explain why each is used;

(E)  demonstrate how to install and service the filters used in HVAC systems;

(F)  use a manometer or differential pressure gauge to measure the friction loss of an air filter;

(G)  identify accessories commonly used with air conditioning systems to improve indoor air quality and reduce energy cost and explain the function of each, including humidity control devices, air filtration devices, and energy conservation devices; and

(H)  demonstrate or describe how to clean an electronic air cleaner.

(6)  The student gains the knowledge and skills in the handling of refrigerant and equipment servicing procedures to service HVAC systems in an environmentally safe manner. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the common types of leak detectors and explain how each is used;

(B)  perform leak detection tests using selected methods;

(C)  identify the service equipment used for evacuating a system and explain why each item of equipment is used;

(D)  perform system evacuation and dehydration;

(E)  identify the service equipment used for recovering refrigerant from a system and for recycling the recovered refrigerant and explain why each item of equipment is used;

(F)  perform a refrigerant recovery;

(G)  evacuate a system to a deep vacuum;

(H)  identify the service equipment used for charging refrigerant into a system and explain why each item of equipment is used;

(I)  use nitrogen to purge a system; and

(J)  charge refrigerant into a system using various methods, including weight, superheat, sub-cooling, and charging pressure chart.

(7)  The student gains knowledge of transformers, single-phase and three-phase power distribution, capacitors, theory and operation of induction motors, and instruments and techniques used in testing alternating current circuits and components. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the operation of various types of transformers;

(B)  explain how alternating current is developed and draw a sine wave;

(C)  identify single-phase and three-phase wiring arrangements;

(D)  explain how phase shift occurs in inductors and capacitors;

(E)  describe the types of capacitors and their applications;

(F)  explain the operation of single-phase and three-phase induction motors;

(G)  identify the various types of single-phase motors and their applications;

(H)  state and demonstrate the safety precautions that must be followed when working with electrical equipment; and

(I)  test alternating current components, including capacitors, transformers, and motors.

(8)  The student learns the theory of solid-state electronics as well as the operation, use, and testing of the various electronic components used in HVAC equipment. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the theory of electronics and semiconductors;

(B)  explain how various semiconductor devices such as diodes, light emitting diodes, and photo diodes work and how the devices are used in power and control circuits;

(C)  identify different types of resistors and explain how their resistance values can be determined;

(D)  describe the operation and function of thermistors and cad cells;

(E)  test semiconductor components; and

(F)  identify the connectors on a personal computer.

(9)  The student learns the operation, testing, and adjustment of conventional and electronic thermostats as well as the operation of common electrical, electronic, and pneumatic circuits used to control HVAC systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the function of a thermostat in an HVAC system;

(B)  describe different types of thermostats and explain how the thermostats are used;

(C)  demonstrate the correct installation and adjustment of a thermostat;

(D)  explain the principles applicable to all control systems;

(E)  identify the various types of electromechanical, electronic, and pneumatic HVAC controls and explain their function and operation;

(F)  describe a systematic approach for electrical troubleshooting of HVAC equipment and components;

(G)  recognize and use equipment manufacturers' troubleshooting aids to troubleshoot HVAC equipment;

(H)  demonstrate how to isolate electrical problems to faulty power distribution, load, or control circuits;

(I)  identify the service instruments needed to troubleshoot HVAC electrical equipment;

(J)  make electrical troubleshooting checks and measurements on circuits and components common to all HVAC equipment; and

(K)  isolate and correct malfunctions in a cooling system control circuit.

(10)  The student learns the tools, instruments, and techniques used in troubleshooting gas heating appliances, including how to isolate and correct faults. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the operating sequence for gas heating equipment;

(B)  interpret control circuit diagrams for gas heating systems;

(C)  describe the operation of various types of burner ignition methods;

(D)  identify the tools and instruments used when troubleshooting gas heating systems;

(E)  demonstrate using the tools and instruments required for troubleshooting gas heating systems; and

(F)  isolate and correct malfunctions in gas heating systems.

(11)  The student learns the techniques and equipment used in troubleshooting cooling equipment and analyzing system temperatures and pressures in order to isolate faults. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe a systematic approach for troubleshooting cooling systems and components;

(B)  isolate problems to electrical and mechanical functions in cooling systems;

(C)  recognize and use equipment manufacturers' troubleshooting aids to troubleshoot cooling systems;

(D)  identify and use the service instruments needed to troubleshoot cooling systems;

(E)  troubleshoot selected problems in cooling equipment; and

(F)  state the safety precautions associated with cooling troubleshooting.

(12)  The student learns the principles of reverse-cycle heating, the operation of various types of heat pumps, and the mechanisms of heat pump control circuits and learns to install and service heat pumps. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the principles of reverse-cycle heating;

(B)  identify heat pumps by type and general classification;

(C)  describe various types of geothermal water loops and their application;

(D)  list the components of heat pump systems;

(E)  describe the role and operation of electric heat in common heat pump systems;

(F)  describe common heat pump ratings such as coefficient of performance, heating season performance factor, and seasonal energy efficiency ratio;

(G)  demonstrate heat pump installation and service procedures;

(H)  identify and install refrigerant circuit accessories commonly associated with heat pumps;

(I)  analyze a heat pump control circuit; and

(J)  isolate and correct malfunctions in a heat pump.

(13)  The student selects the application and installation of various types of fasteners, gaskets, seals, and lubricants as well as the installation and adjustment of different types of belt drives, bearings, and couplings. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify, explain, and install threaded and non-threaded fasteners;

(B)  identify, remove, and install types of gaskets, packings, and seals;

(C)  identify types of lubricants and explain their uses;

(D)  use lubrication equipment to lubricate motor bearings;

(E)  identify the types of belt drives, explain their uses, and demonstrate procedures used to install or adjust them;

(F)  identify and explain types of couplings;

(G)  demonstrate procedures used to remove, install, and align couplings;

(H)  identify types of bearings and explain their uses;

(I)  explain causes of bearing failures;

(J)  demonstrate procedures used to remove and install bearings;

(K)  perform preventive maintenance inspection and cleaning procedures; and

(L)  list ways to develop and maintain good customer relations.

(14)  The student demonstrates how to lay out, fabricate, install, and join sheet metal ductwork. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and describe the types of sheet metal;

(B)  define properties of steel and aluminum alloys;

(C)  describe a layout method and perform proper cutting;

(D)  join sheet metal duct sections using proper seams and connectors;

(E)  describe proper hanging and support methods for sheet metal ductwork;

(F)  describe thermal and acoustic insulation principles;

(G)  select, apply, and seal the proper insulation for sheet metal ductwork;

(H)  describe guidelines for installing components such as register, diffusers, grilles, dampers, access doors, and zoning accessories; and

(I)  install takeoffs and attach flexible duct to a sheet metal duct.

(15)  The student gains the knowledge and skills to lay out, fabricate, install, join, attach, and support fiberglass ductwork and fittings. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify types of fiberglass duct, including flexible duct;

(B)  describe fiberglass duct layout and some basic fabrication methods;

(C)  describe the various closure methods for sealing fiberglass duct;

(D)  fabricate selected duct modules and fittings using the appropriate tools;

(E)  describe hanging and support methods for fiberglass duct;

(F)  describe how to repair major and minor damage to fiberglass duct; and

(G)  install takeoffs and attach flexible duct to a fiberglass duct.

Source: The provisions of this §130.60 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.61. Plumbing Technology I (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Architecture, Principles of Construction, or Construction Technology I. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Plumbing Technology I, students will gain knowledge and skills needed to enter the industry as a plumbing apprentice, building maintenance technician, or supervisor or prepare for a postsecondary degree in construction management, architecture, or engineering. Students will acquire knowledge and skills in industry workplace basics and employer/customer expectations, including how to use a plumbing code book; how to identify and use power and hand tools; how to be safe on the jobsite and when using hand and power tools; how to apply basic plumbing mathematics and plumbing drawing; and how to identify, fit, and use plastic, copper, cast iron, carbon steel, and corrugated stainless steel pipe. In addition, students will be introduced to gas, drainage, and water supply systems and continue their knowledge of workplace basics and green technologies.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student is expected to demonstrate professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate oral communication, written communication, leadership skills, teamwork skills, conflict management, customer service, professionalism, work ethic, integrity, multitasking, initiative, creativity, and how to follow directions;

(B)  understand the importance of showing up to work on time, maintaining appropriate personal appearance, working as a team member, and being honest;

(C)  demonstrate an understanding of the responsibilities of driving a company vehicle;

(D)  demonstrate an understanding of why and how listening is a critical life skill; and

(E)  demonstrate an understanding of the importance of being a self-starter and of increasing one's knowledge and skills in a chosen career field.

(2)  The student understands the causes of accidents and their consequences and repercussions in terms of delays, increased expenses, injury, and loss of life. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the common unsafe acts and conditions that cause accidents;

(B)  describe how to handle unsafe acts and conditions;

(C)  explain the impact and cost of accidents and illnesses;

(D)  demonstrate the use and care of appropriate personal protective equipment;

(E)  identify job-site hazards specific to plumbers;

(F)  demonstrate the proper use of ladders;

(G)  explain how to work around a trench;

(H)  describe and demonstrate the lockout/tagout process; and

(I)  understand the purpose of material safety data sheets (MSDS) and their importance to job-site and personal safety.

(3)  The student understands and demonstrates what employer and customer expectations are and is familiar with industry workplace basics and their importance. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify job opportunities and their accompanying job duties such as a plumber, building maintenance technician or supervisor, manager, and mechanical engineer;

(B)  research careers along with the education, job skills, and experience required to achieve career goals;

(C)  identify the industries and associations that make up the modern plumbing profession;

(D)  demonstrate how to properly treat company and customer property;

(E)  understand the importance of keeping the work area clean and how that applies to job safety; and

(F)  understand the importance of using industry standards and techniques for the job.

(4)  The student understands and demonstrates what green technology is and how it relates to the plumbing profession and environment. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify different green plumbing fixtures;

(B)  identify different types of reuse plumbing systems; and

(C)  design and demonstrate a particular reuse water plumbing system.

(5)  The student selects and safely uses different types of hand and power tools related to a specific task. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the hand and power tools used in the plumbing industry;

(B)  demonstrate the proper use of hand and power plumbing tools;

(C)  demonstrate the ability to know when and how to select the proper tools for tasks;

(D)  demonstrate proper maintenance and care for hand and power tools;

(E)  demonstrate how to prepare a surface for tool use;

(F)  describe the safety requirements for using plumbing tools; and

(G)  identify and demonstrate how to read and use various rulers and measuring tools.

(6)  The student applies mathematical concepts to whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and squared numbers and examines how these concepts apply to specific situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  add, subtract, multiply, and divide whole numbers, fractions, and decimals;

(B)  convert fractions to decimals and decimals to fractions;

(C)  demonstrate mathematical competency in the metric system and how the metric system is used in the plumbing industry;

(D)  square various numbers and determine the square roots of numbers with and without a calculator;

(E)  identify and demonstrate the parts of a plumbing fitting and use common pipe-measuring techniques;

(F)  use fitting dimensions tables to determine fitting allowances and thread makeup; and

(G)  demonstrate how to measure end-to-end, center-to-center, and end-to-center measurements using fitting allowances and thread makeup.

(7)  The student learns the various types of drawings used in the plumbing industry to lay out and install plumbing systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  use current architectural technology to identify pictorial, isometric and oblique, schematic, and orthographic drawings and discuss how different views are used to depict information about objects;

(B)  identify the basic symbols used in schematic drawings of pipe assemblies;

(C)  explain the types of drawings that may be included in a set of plumbing drawings and the relationship among the different drawings;

(D)  interpret plumbing-related information from a set of drawings;

(E)  demonstrate how to sketch orthographic drawings;

(F)  demonstrate the use of an architect's scale to draw lines to scale and to measure lines drawn to scale; and

(G)  explain how code requirements apply to certain drawings.

(8)  The student learns the types and schedules of plastic pipe and fittings used in plumbing applications, including acrylonitrile butadiene styrene or ABS, polyvinyl chloride or PVC, chlorinated polyvinyl chloride or CPVC, polyethylene or Poly pipe, crosslinked polyethylene or PEX, and polybutylene. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify types of materials and schedules of plastic piping;

(B)  identify proper and improper applications of plastic piping;

(C)  identify types of fittings and valves used with plastic fittings;

(D)  identify and determine the kinds of hangers and supports needed for plastic piping;

(E)  identify the various techniques used in hanging and supporting plastic piping;

(F)  demonstrate how to measure, cut, and join the different types of plastic piping;

(G)  explain proper procedures for the handling, storage, and protection of plastic pipes; and

(H)  explain how code requirements apply to different types of plastic pipe.

(9)  The student understands the applications of copper pipe and fittings, the types of valves that can be used on copper pipe systems, and the methods for cutting, reaming, joining, and installing copper tubing. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the different types of copper tubing;

(B)  identify the material properties and storage and handling requirements of copper tubing;

(C)  identify the types of fittings and valves used with copper tubing;

(D)  identify the various techniques used in hanging and supporting copper tubing;

(E)  demonstrate, using industry standards, how to safely solder copper tubing using different heat sources;

(F)  demonstrate how to measure, ream, and cut copper piping;

(G)  identify the hazards and safety precautions associated with copper piping; and

(H)  explain how code requirements apply to copper tubing.

(10)  The student measures, cuts, threads, reams, joins, and hangs carbon steel pipe and becomes familiar with labeling and sizing carbon steel pipe. The student is expected to:

(A)  recognize proper applications of carbon steel piping;

(B)  identify the material properties, storage, and handling requirements of carbon steel piping;

(C)  identify the various techniques used in hanging and supporting carbon steel piping;

(D)  demonstrate how to measure, cut, ream, thread, and join carbon steel piping; and

(E)  explain how code requirements apply to carbon steel pipe.

(11)  The student gains knowledge and skills to connect and install corrugated stainless steel tubing in various installation conditions. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the common manufacturers of corrugated stainless steel tubing;

(B)  recognize proper and improper applications of corrugated stainless steel tubing;

(C)  identify the various techniques used in hanging and supporting corrugated stainless steel tubing;

(D)  demonstrate how to measure, cut, and join corrugated stainless steel tubing;

(E)  identify the material properties, storage, and handling requirements of corrugated stainless steel tubing; and

(F)  explain how code requirements apply to corrugated stainless steel tubing.

(12)  The student understands the way drain, waste, and vent systems remove waste safely. The student understands how pipes, drains, traps, and vents work and the different types of materials used for drain waste and vent (DWV) piping. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain how waste moves from a fixture through the drain system to the public or private sewer system;

(B)  identify the major components of a drainage system and describe their functions;

(C)  identify the different types of traps and their components, explain the importance of traps, and identify the ways that traps can lose their seals;

(D)  identify the various types of drain, waste, and vent fittings and describe their applications;

(E)  identify significant code and health issues, violations, and consequences related to drain, waste, and vent systems;

(F)  identify DWV symbols and lines on an isometric drawing and a floor plan;

(G)  demonstrate how to draw an isometric DWV system to make a materials list;

(H)  recognize and explain the use of different pipe and fitting materials used for DWV piping and how they are assembled; and

(I)  understand how code requirements apply to DWV systems.

(13)  The student identifies major components of a municipal water system and how water is distributed to residential or commercial houses or buildings. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe and explain the earth's water cycle;

(B)  describes different water sources;

(C)  describe and show how water gets from the water well or water meter to the house or building; and

(D)  discuss and explain different types of valves and devices found in a residential or commercial water system.

(14)  The student identifies and draws hot and cold water lines on a floor plan using an isometric drawing. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify hot and cold water lines and their symbols on a floor plan;

(B)  demonstrate how to draw hot and cold water lines on a floor plan using an isometric drawing; and

(C)  demonstrate how to properly size a residential hot and cold water system.

(15)  The student describes and demonstrates the different types of valves and their uses. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain why and where open-close valves are used;

(B)  explain why and where flow regulation valves are used;

(C)  explain why and where pressure reducing valves are used; and

(D)  explain why and where pressure and vacuum relief valves are used.

Source: The provisions of this §130.61 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.62. Plumbing Technology II (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Plumbing Technology I. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Plumbing Technology II, students will gain the advanced knowledge and skills needed to enter the industry as a plumber, building maintenance technician, or supervisor or prepare for a postsecondary degree in mechanical engineering. Students will acquire knowledge and skills in plumbing codes, industry workplace basics, and employer/customer expectations, including tool and jobsite safety, advanced plumbing mathematics, commercial drawings, basic electricity, hanger installation, supports and structural penetrations, roof drains, fixture installation, valves and faucets, and oxy-fuel safety. Students will also learn about setup, cutting, brazing and welding water system sizing; gas, drain, waste and vent installation and testing; and water heater installation.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  use industry standards to demonstrate oral communication, written communication, leadership, teamwork, conflict management, customer service, professionalism, work ethic, integrity, multitasking, initiative, creativity, and how to follow directions;

(B)  demonstrate an understanding of the importance of showing up to work on time, maintaining appropriate personal appearance, working as a team member, and being honest;

(C)  demonstrate an understanding of the responsibilities of driving a company vehicle;

(D)  demonstrate an understanding of why and how listening is a critical skill; and

(E)  demonstrate an understanding of the importance of being a self-starter and of increasing one's knowledge and skills in a chosen career field.

(2)  The student identifies and demonstrates the use of hand and power tools such as pipe wrenches; rulers; measuring devices; drill bits; pipe stands; pipe vises; levels; pipe fabrication tools; and pipe cutting, threading, and reaming tools. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate how to measure with a 6-foot folding rule and 25-foot measuring tape;

(B)  read and use rulers and measuring devices;

(C)  demonstrate how to measure end-to-end, center-to-center, and end-to-center pipe measurements; and

(D)  identify and safely demonstrate the use of selected hand and power tools.

(3)  The student understands different types of drill bits used in the plumbing profession. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the differences among and applications for masonry, twist steel, hole saw, paddle, and self-feeding wood bits; and

(B)  demonstrate the use and application of masonry, twist steel, hole saw, paddle, and self- feeding wood bits.

(4)  The student applies algebra and geometry to solve plumbing-related problems. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate how to determine the volume of a cylinder;

(B)  demonstrate how to determine volume and length measurements using cubic feet and yards;

(C)  demonstrate how to determine fall and grades of a pipe;

(D)  demonstrate how to calculate simple and rolling offsets on parallel runs using constants;

(E)  demonstrate how to calculate pressure, velocity, friction, and flow; and

(F)  size a water system based on velocity limitations and pressure drop.

(5)  The student reviews employer and customer expectations. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify job opportunities such as a plumber, building maintenance technician or supervisor, manager, and mechanical engineer and their accompanying job duties;

(B)  research careers along with the education, job skills, and experience required to achieve career goals;

(C)  identify the industries and associations that make up the modern plumbing profession;

(D)  demonstrate an understanding of how to properly treat company and customer property;

(E)  demonstrate an understanding of the importance of keeping the work area clean and how that applies to job safety; and

(F)  demonstrate an understanding of the importance of using proper methods and techniques for the job being performed.

(6)  The student understands and applies electrical testing equipment. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply the use of a volt/ohm meter to different kinds of plumbing equipment;

(B)  install hangers and supports and make penetrations according to plumbing code;

(C)  demonstrate an understanding of how to choose the right hanger for the application;

(D)  choose and build pipe supports;

(E)  demonstrate an understanding of code standards on structural penetrations; and

(F)  size and install roof drains according to plumbing code.

(7)  The student understands and applies how to install plumbing fixtures according to plumbing code. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate how to install a toilet; and

(B)  demonstrate how to install sinks and different faucets.

(8)  The student learns plot plans, structural design, shop drawings, elevation drawings, as-built drawings, equipment arrangement drawings, pipe and instrumentation drawings, isometric drawings, and detail drawings. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify types of drawings;

(B)  identify and use drawing symbols associated with piping plans and details;

(C)  create field sketches; and

(D)  interpret drawing indexes and line lists.

(9)  The student installs, stores, and handles various types of valves. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify types of valves that start and stop flow;

(B)  identify types of valves that regulate flow;

(C)  identify valves that relieve pressure;

(D)  identify valves that regulate the direction of flow;

(E)  identify types of valve actuators;

(F)  explain how to properly store and handle valves;

(G)  explain valve locations and positions;

(H)  explain the factors that influence valve selection; and

(I)  interpret valve markings and nameplate information.

(10)  The student understands and applies how to braze weld and cut with oxy-fuel torch. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate an understanding of different parts of oxy-fuel equipment;

(B)  identify and implement the proper procedure for attaching and adjusting oxy fuel pressure regulators, gauges, hoses, and torches to oxy fuel bottles;

(C)  identify and apply fillers and fluxes for soldering and brazing; and

(D)  demonstrate an understanding of safety and safety equipment used with oxy-fuel equipment.

(11)  The student understands and applies how to size, install, and test a residential water piping system according to plumbing code. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify what factors are critical for sizing a water system such as water pressure, velocity, friction, and flow;

(B)  identify what fixture units are and how they apply to sizing a water system;

(C)  install a water piping system; and

(D)  test a water piping system.

(12)  The student understands what cross connections are and their degree of hazard and how to protect against them. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify different types of backflow such as gravity, back-pressure, and back siphonage;

(B)  demonstrate an understanding of degree of hazard such as toxic, nontoxic, polluted, and contaminated; and

(C)  demonstrate an understanding of cross connection protection such as air gap, reduced pressure zone backflow preventer, double check valve assembly, pressure type vacuum breaker, and atmospheric type vacuum breaker.

(13)  The student understands and applies how to size, install, and test a natural gas system according to plumbing code. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the factors involved in sizing a natural gas system; and

(B)  size, install, and test a natural gas system using carbon steel pipe and corrugated stainless steel tubing.

(14)  The student understands how to size, install, and test a drain waste and vent (DWV) system according to plumbing code. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify different types of DWV fittings and their use;

(B)  size a DWV system;

(C)  identify and apply different materials used for a DWV system;

(D)  determine slope of a pipe using formulas;

(E)  demonstrate an understanding of how to test a DWV system; and

(F)  demonstrate an understanding of the different parts and their purpose of a DWV system such as stacks, vents, traps, building drain, and building sewer.

(15)  The student understands different types of water heaters, water heaters parts, and their proper installation according to plumbing code. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate an understanding of storage tank (electric and gas), point of use, on demand (electric and gas), and solar water heaters;

(B)  demonstrate an understanding of parts of the different heaters; and

(C)  demonstrate an understanding of the installation of a gas and electric water heater.

Source: The provisions of this §130.62 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.63. Practicum in Construction Management (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grade 12. Prerequisite: Construction Management II. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  Practicum in Construction Management is an occupationally specific course designed to provide classroom technical instruction or on-the-job training experiences. Safety and career opportunities are included in addition to work ethics and job-related study in the classroom.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(B)  demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(C)  demonstrate positive interpersonal skills, including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership;

(D)  evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and achievement;

(E)  demonstrate appropriate grooming and appearance for the workplace;

(F)  demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette in the workplace; and

(G)  exhibit productive work habits and attitudes.

(2)  The student develops a management plan for a project or an activity. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and describe the steps required to complete a project using project management processes, including initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing a project;

(B)  determine and acquire the resources needed to complete a project; and

(C)  develop a project schedule.

(3)  The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to a research and development project. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required;

(B)  locate the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations; and

(C)  interpret the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(4)  The student describes the intended and unintended effects of construction management solutions. The student is expected to:

(A)  use an assessment strategy to determine the risks and benefits of a research project; and

(B)  describe how construction management has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments.

(5)  The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to research, design, and development. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B)  apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C)  apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(6)  The student describes the costs associated with research and development activities. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop a budget for a research and development project; and

(B)  determine the most effective way to minimize project costs.

(7)  The student applies knowledge and skills in communication, mathematics, and science to construction management activities. The student is expected to:

(A)  write technical reports;

(B)  deliver technical presentations to groups of individuals;

(C)  apply the mathematical concepts used in projects; and

(D)  apply the science concepts used in projects.

(8)  The student predicts the marketability of a project, product, or service. The student is expected to:

(A)  determine the customer's expectations concerning a project, product, or service;

(B)  evaluate a project, product, or service to determine if it will meet the customer's expectations; and

(C)  assess customer responses.

(9)  The student uses advanced tools, materials, processes, and procedures in construction management. The student is expected to:

(A)  determine and use the appropriate technology needed to solve a problem or complete a task;

(B)  evaluate the use of technology in a given situation; and

(C)  describe the factors that influence the use of technology in a variety of situations.

(10)  The student designs a project using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A)  design an object or a service using an accepted design process;

(B)  develop drawings, illustrations, or models; and

(C)  establish design criteria and constraints.

(11)  The student predicts the impacts of emerging applications of construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the emerging technologies in a field; and

(B)  identify the factors that may influence the adoption of emerging technologies.

(12)  The student improves the quality of a product or service using different quality-control techniques. The student is expected to:

(A)  define quality;

(B)  assess the quality of a specific product or service; and

(C)  determine how the quality of a product or service can be improved.

(13)  The student recommends new ways to build products using different tools, equipment, machines, materials, and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A)  build products in a more efficient manner using a variety of tools, equipment, machines, materials, and processes; and

(B)  demonstrate advanced construction-management skills.

(14)  The student proposes safety devices required to complete different tasks. The student is expected to:

(A)  recommend improvements to safety standards; and

(B)  specify safety devices that allow for the safe completion of a task.

(15)  The student performs advanced equipment maintenance. The student is expected to:

(A)  maintain tools and materials correctly;

(B)  locate and perform manufacturers' maintenance procedures on selected tools, equipment, and machines; and

(C)  describe the results of negligent or improper maintenance.

(16)  The student suggests how the cost of a project, product, or service can be reduced. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the factors that influence the cost of a project, product, or service; and

(B)  select materials or processes that will reduce the cost of producing the product or delivering the service.

(17)  The student applies knowledge and skills in mathematics, science, English language arts, and social studies as they relate to construction management. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop a school-based learning activity that provides an in-depth study of at least one aspect of construction management;

(B)  establish at least one industry-related mentor for the school-based learning activity;

(C)  present the product in at least two formats to a panel of students, teachers, and practitioners in construction management; and

(D)  deliver a final product that demonstrates the use of a variety of resources, technologies, and communication skills.

(18)  The student determines employment opportunities and preparation requirements for careers in the construction-management industries. The student is expected to:

(A)  determine preparation requirements for various levels of employment in a variety of careers in construction management;

(B)  analyze the future employment outlook of construction management;

(C)  describe entrepreneurial opportunities in construction management;

(D)  determine how interests, abilities, personal priorities, and family responsibilities affect career choice;

(E)  compare rewards and demands for various levels of employment in a variety of careers; and

(F)  determine continuing education opportunities that enhance career advancement.

(19)  The student demonstrates ethical and legal practices for careers in construction management. The student is expected to:

(A)  summarize the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees;

(B)  exhibit ethical practices as defined in construction management; and

(C)  analyze legal aspects of construction management.

(20)  The student selects the appropriate technological resources to conduct research, design, and development activities. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply technology to individual or community problems;

(B)  describe the factors that affect the purchase and use of items;

(C)  differentiate among research, design, and development; and

(D)  distinguish among adaptation, imitation, innovation, and invention.

(21)  The student designs or improves a product using appropriate design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop or improve a product or service that meets a specified need;

(B)  identify how quality, reliability, and safety can be designed into a product;

(C)  describe the functions and methodologies used in basic and applied research; and

(D)  develop a project portfolio that documents a research and development project.

Source: The provisions of this §130.63 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.64. Practicum in Construction Technology (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grade 12. Prerequisite: Construction Technology II. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Practicum in Construction Technology, students will be challenged with the application of gained knowledge and skills from Construction Technology I and II. In many cases students will be allowed to work at a job (paid or unpaid) outside of school or be involved in local projects the school has approved for this class.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the role of an employee in the construction industry;

(B)  demonstrate critical-thinking skills;

(C)  demonstrate the ability to solve problems using critical-thinking skills;

(D)  demonstrate knowledge of basic computer systems;

(E)  explain common uses for computers in the construction industry;

(F)  demonstrate effective relationship skills; and

(G)  recognize workplace issues such as sexual harassment, stress, and substance abuse.

(2)  The student develops a management plan for a project or an activity. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and describe the steps required to complete a project using project management processes, including initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing a project;

(B)  determine and acquire the resources needed to complete a project; and

(C)  develop a project schedule.

(3)  The student applies the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to a research and development project. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required;

(B)  locate the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations; and

(C)  interpret and comply with the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(4)  The student describes the expectations for each project using a flowchart. The student is expected to:

(A)  use an assessment strategy to determine the task's needs;

(B)  describe why each task needs to be in the order it has been assigned;

(C)  assess the time frame for each task; and

(D)  plot a completed project flowchart expectation.

(5)  The student solves problems, thinks critically, and makes decisions related to research, design, and development. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop or improve the project by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B)  apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C)  apply decision-making techniques to the selection of technological solutions.

(6)  The student describes the costs associated with the project. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop a bill of materials list for the complete project;

(B)  develop a budget, including a cost list, for the complete project; and

(C)  determine the most effective way to minimize project costs.

(7)  The student applies communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to the construction activities. The student is expected to:

(A)  write technical reports;

(B)  deliver technical presentations to the instructor;

(C)  identify and describe the mathematical concepts used in projects; and

(D)  identify and describe the science concepts used in projects.

(8)  The student uses advanced tools, materials, processes, and procedures in the construction project. The student is expected to:

(A)  determine and use the appropriate technology needed to solve a problem or complete a task;

(B)  evaluate the use of technology in a given situation; and

(C)  describe the factors that influence the use of technology in a variety of situations.

Source: The provisions of this §130.64 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.65. Practicum in Masonry Technology (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grade 12. Prerequisite: Masonry Technology II. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  Practicum in Masonry Technology is an occupationally specific course designed to provide classroom technical instruction or work-based learning experiences. Instruction may be delivered through laboratory training or through career preparation delivery arrangements. Safety and career opportunities are included, in addition to work ethics and job-related study in the classroom. Trade and industrial education provides the knowledge, skills, and technologies required for employment in masonry construction. Students will develop knowledge of the concepts and skills related to this trade in order to apply them to personal/career development. Trade and industrial education depends on and supports integration of academic, career, and technical knowledge and skills. To prepare for success, students must have opportunities to reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems. Knowledge about career opportunities, requirements, and expectations and the development of workplace skills prepare students for success. For safety and liability considerations, including power tools usage during training, limiting course enrollment to 15 students is recommended.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the role of an employee in the construction industry;

(B)  demonstrate critical-thinking skills;

(C)  demonstrate the ability to solve problems using critical-thinking skills;

(D)  demonstrate knowledge of basic computer systems;

(E)  explain common uses for computers in the construction industry;

(F)  demonstrate effective relationship skills; and

(G)  recognize workplace issues such as sexual harassment, stress, and substance abuse.

(2)  The student demonstrates trowel proficiency. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate proficiency spreading mortar;

(B)  demonstrate proficiency spreading mortar at various heights;

(C)  demonstrate proficiency spreading mortar on different types and sizes of brick;

(D)  demonstrate proficiency spreading mortar on different types and sizes of concrete masonry units (CMU); and

(E)  demonstrate proficiency buttering masonry units laid in different positions in a masonry wall.

(3)  The student constructs single wythe brick walls with level. The student is expected to:

(A)  build a brick lead with a level;

(B)  build a brick wall with a level;

(C)  build an outside corner with a level;

(D)  build an inside corner with a level; and

(E)  build a double wythe brick wall with a level.

(4)  The student constructs a brick wall demonstrating different brick positions in a wall. The student is expected to:

(A)  lay a stretcher in a masonry wall;

(B)  lay a header in a masonry wall;

(C)  lay a rowlock in a masonry wall;

(D)  lay a sailor in a masonry wall;

(E)  lay a soldier in a masonry wall; and

(F)  lay a shiner (rowlock stretcher) in a masonry wall.

(5)  The student builds a brick column. The student is expected to:

(A)  construct a four-brick column with a level;

(B)  construct a six-brick column with a level;

(C)  construct an eight-brick column with a level; and

(D)  construct a ten-brick column with a level.

(6)  The student lays CMU. The student is expected to:

(A)  build a block CMU lead with a level;

(B)  build a block CMU wall with a level; and

(C)  build a block CMU corner with a level.

(7)  The student builds a block CMU column. The student is expected to:

(A)  build a four-block column of 8-inch block CMU;

(B)  build a six-block column of 8-inch block CMU;

(C)  build a ten-block column of 8-inch block CMU;

(D)  build a four-block column of 4-inch CMU; and

(E)  build a four-block column of 6-inch CMU.

(8)  The student constructs a composite masonry wall of brick and block. The student is expected to:

(A)  build a composite wall of brick and 8-inch block CMU; and

(B)  build a composite wall of brick and 4-inch block CMU.

(9)  The student installs coping on a masonry wall. The student is expected to:

(A)  lay single brick rowlock coping on a masonry wall;

(B)  lay double brick rowlock coping on a masonry wall;

(C)  lay 12-inch bonded brick rowlock coping on a masonry wall;

(D)  lay 16-inch bonded brick rowlock coping on a masonry wall;

(E)  install limestone coping on a masonry wall;

(F)  install cast stone coping on a masonry wall; and

(G)  install prefab concrete coping on a masonry wall.

(10)  The student constructs a natural stone wall. The student is expected to:

(A)  set natural stone in a random pattern in a masonry wall;

(B)  set natural stone in an ashlar pattern in a masonry wall; and

(C)  install flat work of natural stone in a random pattern.

(11)  The student installs manufactured stone. The student is expected to:

(A)  install manufactured stone on a wall in a random pattern; and

(B)  install manufactured stone on a wall in an ashlar pattern.

(12)  The student lays brick to a line. The student is expected to:

(A)  lay modular brick to a line;

(B)  lay king-size brick to a line;

(C)  lay queen-size brick to a line; and

(D)  lay utility brick to a line.

(13)  The student lays CMU to a line. The student is expected to:

(A)  lay 8-inch block CMU to a line;

(B)  lay 4-inch block CMU to a line;

(C)  lay 6-inch block CMU to a line; and

(D)  lay 12-inch block CMU to a line.

Source: The provisions of this §130.65 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.66. Practicum in Architectural Design (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grade 12. Prerequisite: Architectural Design II. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  Practicum in Architectural Design is an occupationally specific course designed to provide technical instruction in architectural design. Safety and career opportunities are included in addition to work ethics and architectural design study.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify employment opportunities, including entrepreneurship and preparation requirements, for the student's chosen field;

(B)  demonstrate an understanding of group participation and leadership related to citizenship and career preparation;

(C)  demonstrate productive work habits and attitudes;

(D)  apply the competencies related to resources, information, interpersonal skills, systems, and technology in appropriate settings and situations; and

(E)  demonstrate knowledge of the concepts and skills related to health and safety in the workplace, as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(2)  The student relates communication, mathematics, and science to the requirements of the student's chosen field. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate effective verbal and written communication skills with individuals from varied cultures, including fellow workers, managers, and customers;

(B)  apply mathematics principles and practices;

(C)  apply and identify scientific principles used in projects; and

(D)  read and interpret appropriate schematics, charts, graphs, drawings, construction documents, directions, manuals, bulletins, and regulations.

(3)  The student knows the function and application of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in the student's chosen field. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and select basic materials and processes used in the student's chosen field;

(B)  use the tools and equipment commonly employed in the student's chosen field in a safe manner;

(C)  handle and dispose of environmentally hazardous materials used in the student's chosen field in a proper manner; and

(D)  demonstrate knowledge of new and emerging technologies in the student's chosen field.

(4)  The student selects and uses multimedia communication and rendering technology to meet specific architectural design needs. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply multimedia communication and rendering technology to individual or community problems;

(B)  describe the factors that affect the use and interpretation of communication products; and

(C)  identify and describe the roles of communication such as informing, persuading, and educating.

(5)  The student designs multimedia communication and rendering products using appropriate architectural design processes and techniques. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop or improve communication products that meet specified needs; and

(B)  maintain a project portfolio that documents architectural projects using a variety of multimedia techniques.

(6)  The student produces multimedia communication and rendering products using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials, and processes. The student is expected to:

(A)  use a variety of tools, equipment, and machines; and

(B)  produce an architectural project using multimedia communication techniques.

(7)  The student follows appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify areas where codes, laws, standards, or regulations may be required;

(B)  locate the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations; and

(C)  comply with the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations.

(8)  The student demonstrates the ability to solve problems, think critically, and make decisions. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(B)  apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(C)  apply decision-making techniques.

(9)  The student applies communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to job-related activities. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply written, verbal, and visual communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B)  use mathematics concepts in communication technology; and

(C)  identify and apply scientific principles.

(10)  The student determines employment opportunities and preparation requirements for careers in the field of architecture. The student is expected to:

(A)  determine preparation requirements for various levels of employment in a variety of careers;

(B)  analyze the future employment outlook;

(C)  describe entrepreneurial opportunities in architecture and related fields;

(D)  determine how interests, abilities, personal priorities, and family responsibilities affect career choice;

(E)  compare rewards and demands for various levels of employment in a variety of careers; and

(F)  determine continuing education opportunities that enhance career advancement and promote lifelong learning.

(11)  The student demonstrates ethical and legal practices for careers in the architectural-related workplace. The student is expected to:

(A)  summarize the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees;

(B)  exhibit ethical practices as defined by the architectural industry;

(C)  analyze legal aspects of the architectural-related workplace;

(D)  develop a school-based learning activity in collaboration with the teacher and at least one related mentor that provides an in-depth study of at least one aspect of a selected business, industry, and labor independent study;

(E)  present the project in at least two formats such as model, graphic, verbal, or written to a panel of students, teachers, and practitioners in the career concentration;

(F)  maintain a project portfolio that documents experience by using graphic or written documentation of architectural-related projects; and

(G)  develop and update a professional resume that includes appropriate education history, work history, professional references, letters of recommendation, and all relevant information for any licenses, certifications, and credentials.

Source: The provisions of this §130.66 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.67. Practicum in Interior Design (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grade 12. Prerequisite: Interior Design II. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  Practicum in Interior Design is an occupationally specific course designed to provide job-specific skills through laboratory training, job shadowing, or work situations in areas compatible with identified career goals in interior design. In addition, students will be expected to develop knowledge and skills related to housing, furnishings, and equipment construction or equipment management and services.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply oral and written communication skills clearly, concisely, convincingly, and effectively to explain and justify actions in a socially acceptable manner that is easily understood by others;

(B)  problem-solve using job-appropriate mathematical skills;

(C)  demonstrate an understanding of leadership skills;

(D)  cooperate, contribute, and collaborate as a member of a group;

(E)  exhibit professionalism through dress, speech, and manners that are appropriate to the profession and worksite;

(F)  review accurately both quantitative and qualitative work processes and end products;

(G)  follow written and oral instructions and adhere to established practices, policies, and procedures, including health and safety rules; and

(H)  use and apply job-appropriate computer applications for the given task.

(2)  The student determines the use of elements and principles of design in residential and nonresidential environments and furnishings. The student is expected to:

(A)  differentiate between the elements and principles of design;

(B)  exhibit how the elements of design can create various effects;

(C)  apply elements and principles of design for coordinating furnishings; and

(D)  analyze societal and cultural influences on the design of residential and nonresidential environments and their furnishings.

(3)  The student analyzes the workmanship, characteristics, use, and care of materials used in the design and construction of residential and nonresidential furnishings and equipment. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze characteristics of materials and workmanship in relationship to durability and use;

(B)  identify characteristics of materials and workmanship in relationship to appearance, performance, use, and care of furnishings;

(C)  explain labeling requirements and appropriate procedures for the care of various furnishings;

(D)  interpret information provided in equipment use and care manuals; and

(E)  demonstrate procedures for the care and maintenance of different types of furnishings and equipment.

(4)  The student determines treatments and accessories suitable for residential and nonresidential applications. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze products to determine the appropriate style of design;

(B)  determine appropriate use of accessories, lighting, materials, and space in various environments, including environments designed to meet special needs;

(C)  describe trends in materials, including eco-friendly and sustainable materials, accessories, lighting, and use of space;

(D)  illustrate appropriate window treatments for specific windows;

(E)  evaluate cost considerations and budgets in accessorizing for various settings;

(F)  describe characteristics, use, and care of wall treatments; and

(G)  identify characteristics of types of flooring in relationship to design and construction.

(5)  The student assesses factors influencing the selection of furniture and equipment for residential and nonresidential applications. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe furniture and equipment used in residential and nonresidential applications;

(B)  compare furniture and equipment needs of families in different stages of the life cycle;

(C)  evaluate economic considerations when selecting furniture and equipment;

(D)  arrange furniture and equipment to accommodate floor plans to meet needs and wants;

(E)  describe considerations for selecting furniture and equipment to accommodate persons with special needs; and

(F)  research trends and technology related to furnishings and equipment.

(6)  The student applies safety and sanitation practices. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply safety rules in performing various workplace procedures according to industry standards;

(B)  identify potential hazards;

(C)  promote prevention practices;

(D)  summarize laws pertaining to safety and sanitation practices;

(E)  demonstrate appropriate responses to emergency situations; and

(F)  determine workplace procedures that protect the environment.

(7)  The student determines appropriate use and care of tools and equipment used in construction of furnishings. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify tools and equipment used in construction of furnishings;

(B)  demonstrate safe and skillful tool care and use; and

(C)  describe the impact of technology on tools, equipment, and construction.

(8)  The student demonstrates skills in selected product design and construction. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate characteristics of good workmanship in furnishings products;

(B)  apply knowledge of design application, selection, and construction to complete furnishings projects; and

(C)  analyze uses of technology in furnishings, design, and construction.

(9)  The student identifies types of business promotion practices and their benefit to the housing and furnishings retailer. The student is expected to:

(A)  discuss business promotion objectives in the retail housing and furnishings industry;

(B)  analyze techniques using sales promotion, advertising, and displays;

(C)  describe the use of technology and other forms of advertising media in housing and furnishings business promotions;

(D)  analyze how business promotion reflects the environment in which a person lives; and

(E)  predict how societal trends and changing demographics influence housing and furnishings business promotions.

(10)  The student evaluates customer relations as a tool for successful business operations. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the importance of good customer relations in building and maintaining a business;

(B)  demonstrate techniques for maintaining good client relationships; and

(C)  describe conflict-resolution techniques when dealing with customer complaints.

(11)  The student exhibits employability skills that lead to job success in the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills;

(B)  demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment;

(C)  demonstrate positive interpersonal skills, including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership;

(D)  evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and achievement;

(E)  demonstrate appropriate grooming and appearance for the workplace;

(F)  demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette in the workplace;

(G)  exhibit productive work habits and attitudes; and

(H)  maintain a project portfolio that documents interior design projects using a variety of multimedia techniques with a professional resume.

(12)  The student determines employment opportunities and preparation requirements for careers in the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries. The student is expected to:

(A)  determine preparation requirements for various levels of employment in a variety of careers in the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries;

(B)  analyze the future employment outlook in the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries;

(C)  describe entrepreneurial opportunities in the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries;

(D)  determine how interests, abilities, personal priorities, and family responsibilities affect career choice;

(E)  analyze rewards and demands for various levels of employment in a variety of careers; and

(F)  research continuing education opportunities that enhance career advancement and promote lifelong learning.

(13)  The student demonstrates ethical and legal practices for careers in the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries. The student is expected to:

(A)  research and summarize the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees;

(B)  exhibit ethical practices as defined by the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries; and

(C)  analyze legal aspects of the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries.

Source: The provisions of this §130.67 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.68. Extended Practicum in Construction Management (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grade 12. The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the Architecture and Construction Career Cluster. Prerequisite: Construction Management II. Corequisite: Practicum in Construction Management. This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Construction Management and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  Extended Practicum in Construction Management is an occupationally specific course designed to provide classroom technical instruction or on-the-job training experiences. Safety and career opportunities are included in addition to work ethics and job-related study in the classroom.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  participate in a paid or unpaid, laboratory- or work-based application of previously studied knowledge and skills related to construction management;

(B)  participate in training, education, or preparation for licensure, certification, or other relevant credentials to prepare for employment;

(C)  demonstrate professional standards and personal qualities needed to be employable such as punctuality, time management, initiative, and cooperation with increased fluency;

(D)  complete tasks with high standards to ensure quality products and services;

(E)  employ teamwork and conflict-management skills with increased fluency to achieve collective goals; and

(F)  employ planning and time-management skills and tools with increased fluency to enhance results and complete work tasks.

(2)  The student implements advanced professional communications strategies. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply appropriate content knowledge, technical concepts, and vocabulary when analyzing information and following directions;

(B)  demonstrate verbal and non-verbal communication consistently in a clear, concise, and effective manner;

(C)  analyze, interpret, and effectively communicate information, data, and observations;

(D)  observe and interpret verbal and nonverbal cues and behaviors to enhance communication; and

(E)  apply active listening skills to obtain and clarify information.

(3)  The student applies concepts of critical thinking and problem solving. The student is expected to:

(A)  employ critical-thinking skills with increased fluency both independently and in groups to solve problems and make decisions; and

(B)  analyze elements of a problem to develop creative and innovative solutions.

(4)  The student understands and applies proper safety techniques in the workplace. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate understanding of and consistently follow workplace safety rules and regulations;

(B)  demonstrate safe operation of tools and equipment;

(C)  describe and perform hazard analysis;

(D)  specify safety devices that allow for the safe completion of a task; and

(E)  demonstrate knowledge of procedures for reporting and handling accidents and safety incidents.

(5)  The student understands the professional, ethical, and legal responsibilities in construction management. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate a positive, productive work ethic by performing assigned tasks as directed;

(B)  apply ethical reasoning to a variety of situations in order to make ethical decisions;

(C)  exhibit ethical practices as defined in construction management; and

(D)  comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations in a consistent manner.

(6)  The student participates in a construction management experience. The student is expected to:

(A)  conduct, document, and evaluate learning activities in a supervised construction management experience;

(B)  develop advanced technical knowledge and skills related to the student's occupational objective;

(C)  demonstrate advanced construction-management skills by building products in a more efficient manner using a variety of tools, equipment, machines, materials, and processes;

(D)  design or improve a product using appropriate design processes and techniques;

(E)  maintain tools and materials correctly;

(F)  design an object or a service using an accepted design process;

(G)  demonstrate growth of technical skill competencies;

(H)  evaluate strengths and weaknesses in technical skill proficiency; and

(I)  collect representative work samples.

Source: The provisions of this §130.68 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 41 TexReg 614.


§130.69. Extended Practicum in Construction Technology (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grade 12. The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the Architecture and Construction Career Cluster. Prerequisite: Construction Technology II. Corequisite: Practicum in Construction Technology. This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Construction Technology and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  In Extended Practicum in Construction Technology, students will be challenged with the application of gained knowledge and skills from Construction Technology I and II. In many cases students will be allowed to work at a job (paid or unpaid) outside of school or be involved in local projects the school has approved for this class.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  participate in a paid or unpaid, laboratory- or work-based application of previously studied knowledge and skills related to construction technology;

(B)  participate in training, education, or preparation for licensure, certification, or other relevant credentials to prepare for employment;

(C)  demonstrate professional standards and personal qualities needed to be employable such as punctuality, time management, initiative, and cooperation with increased fluency;

(D)  complete tasks with high standards to ensure quality products and services;

(E)  employ teamwork and conflict-management skills with increased fluency to achieve collective goals; and

(F)  employ planning and time-management skills and tools with increased fluency to enhance results and complete work tasks.

(2)  The student implements advanced professional communications strategies. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply appropriate content knowledge, technical concepts, and vocabulary with increased fluency when analyzing information and following directions;

(B)  demonstrate verbal and non-verbal communication consistently in a clear, concise, and effective manner;

(C)  analyze, interpret, and effectively communicate information, data, and observations;

(D)  observe and interpret verbal and nonverbal cues and behaviors to enhance communication; and

(E)  apply active listening skills to obtain and clarify information.

(3)  The student applies concepts of critical thinking and problem solving. The student is expected to:

(A)  employ critical-thinking skills with increased fluency both independently and in groups to solve problems and make decisions;

(B)  analyze elements of a problem to develop creative and innovative solutions; and

(C)  develop or improve a project by following a problem-solving strategy;

(4)  The student understands and applies proper safety techniques in the workplace. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate understanding of and consistently follow workplace safety rules and regulations; and

(B)  demonstrate knowledge of procedures for reporting and handling accidents and safety incidents.

(5)  The student understands the professional, ethical, and legal responsibilities in construction technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate a positive, productive work ethic by performing assigned tasks as directed;

(B)  apply ethical reasoning to a variety of situations in order to make ethical decisions; and

(C)  comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations in a consistent manner.

(6)  The student participates in a construction technology experience. The student is expected to:

(A)  conduct, document, and evaluate learning activities in a supervised construction technology experience;

(B)  develop advanced technical knowledge and skills related to the student's occupational objective;

(C)  develop a management plan for a project or an activity;

(D)  apply the appropriate codes, laws, standards, or regulations related to a research and development project;

(E)  develop a flowchart to plan a project;

(F)  determine and use the appropriate technology to solve a problem or complete a task;

(G)  demonstrate growth of technical skill competencies;

(H)  evaluate strengths and weaknesses in technical skill proficiency; and

(I)  collect representative work samples.

Source: The provisions of this §130.69 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 41 TexReg 614.


§130.70. Extended Practicum in Masonry Technology (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grade 12. The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the Architecture and Construction Career Cluster. Prerequisite: Masonry Technology II. Corequisite: Practicum in Masonry Technology. This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Masonry Technology and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  Extended Practicum in Masonry Technology is an occupationally specific course designed to provide classroom technical instruction or work-based learning experiences. Instruction may be delivered through laboratory training or through career preparation delivery arrangements. Safety and career opportunities are included, in addition to work ethics and job-related study in the classroom. Trade and industrial education provides the knowledge, skills, and technologies required for employment in masonry construction. Students will develop knowledge of the concepts and skills related to this trade in order to apply them to personal/career development. Trade and industrial education depends on and supports integration of academic, career, and technical knowledge and skills. To prepare for success, students must have opportunities to reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems. Knowledge about career opportunities, requirements, and expectations and the development of workplace skills prepare students for success. For safety and liability considerations, including power tools usage during training, limiting course enrollment to 15 students is recommended.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  participate in a paid or unpaid, laboratory- or work-based application of previously studied knowledge and skills related to masonry technology;

(B)  participate in training, education, or preparation for licensure, certification, or other relevant credentials to prepare for employment;

(C)  demonstrate professional standards and personal qualities needed to be employable such as punctuality, time management, initiative, and cooperation with increased fluency;

(D)  employ teamwork and conflict-management skills with increased fluency to achieve collective goals; and

(E)  employ planning and time-management skills and tools with increased fluency to enhance results and complete work tasks.

(2)  The student implements advanced professional communications strategies. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate verbal and non-verbal communication consistently in a clear, concise, and effective manner;

(B)  observe and interpret verbal and nonverbal cues and behaviors to enhance communication; and

(C)  apply active listening skills to obtain and clarify information.

(3)  The student applies concepts of critical thinking and problem solving. The student is expected to employ critical-thinking skills with increased fluency both independently and in groups to solve problems and make decisions.

(4)  The student understands and applies proper safety techniques in the workplace. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate understanding of and consistently follow workplace safety rules and regulations; and

(B)  demonstrate knowledge of procedures for reporting and handling accidents and safety incidents.

(5)  The student understands the professional, ethical, and legal responsibilities in masonry technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate a positive, productive work ethic by performing assigned tasks as directed;

(B)  apply ethical reasoning to a variety of situations in order to make ethical decisions; and

(C)  comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations in a consistent manner.

(6)  The student participates in a masonry technology experience. The student is expected to:

(A)  conduct, document, and evaluate learning activities in a supervised masonry technology experience;

(B)  develop advanced technical knowledge and skills related to the student's occupational objective;

(C)  demonstrate proficiency spreading mortar;

(D)  construct single wythe brick walls with level;

(E)  construct a brick wall demonstrating different brick positions in a wall;

(F)  build a brick column with advanced proficiency;

(G)  lay concrete masonry unit (CMU) with advanced proficiency;

(H)  build a block CMU column with advanced proficiency;

(I)  construct a composite masonry wall of brick and block;

(J)  install coping on a masonry wall with advanced proficiency;

(K)  construct a natural stone wall with advanced proficiency;

(L)  install manufactured stone with advanced proficiency;

(M)  lay brick and CMU to a line with advanced proficiency;

(N)  demonstrate growth of technical skill competencies;

(O)  evaluate strengths and weaknesses in technical skill proficiency; and

(P)  collect representative work samples.

Source: The provisions of this §130.70 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 41 TexReg 614.


§130.71. Extended Practicum in Architectural Design (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grade 12. The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the Architecture and Construction Career Cluster. Prerequisite: Architectural Design II. Corequisite: Practicum in Architectural Design. This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Architectural Design and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  Extended Practicum in Architectural Design is an occupationally specific course designed to provide technical instruction in architectural design. Safety and career opportunities are included in addition to work ethics and architectural design study.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  participate in a paid or unpaid, laboratory- or work-based application of previously studied knowledge and skills related to architectural design;

(B)  participate in training, education, or preparation for licensure, certification, or other relevant credentials to prepare for employment;

(C)  demonstrate professional standards and personal qualities needed to be employable such as self-discipline, positive attitude, integrity, leadership, appreciation for diversity, customer service, work ethic, and adaptability with increased fluency;

(D)  employ teamwork and conflict-management skills with increased fluency to achieve collective goals; and

(E)  employ planning and time-management skills and tools with increased fluency to enhance results and complete work tasks.

(2)  The student applies professional communications strategies. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate verbal and non-verbal communication consistently in a clear, concise, and effective manner;

(B)  apply active listening skills to obtain and clarify information;

(C)  create and deliver formal and informal presentations effectively;

(D)  analyze, interpret, and effectively communicate information, data, and observations; and

(E)  observe and interpret verbal and nonverbal cues and behaviors to enhance communication.

(3)  The student implements advanced problem-solving methods. The student is expected to:

(A)  employ critical-thinking skills with increased fluency both independently and in groups to solve problems and make decisions;

(B)  analyze elements of problems to develop creative and innovative solutions;

(C)  apply decision-making techniques with increased fluency to the selection of technological solutions;

(D)  develop or improve a product by following a problem-solving strategy;

(E)  apply critical-thinking strategies to the analysis and evaluation of proposed technological solutions; and

(F)  conduct technical research to gather information necessary for decision making.

(4)  The student understands and applies proper safety and security techniques in the workplace. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate understanding of and consistently follow workplace safety rules and regulations;

(B)  handle and dispose of environmentally hazardous materials used in the student's chosen field in a proper manner; and

(C)  demonstrate use of tools and equipment commonly employed in the architectural design field in a safe manner.

(5)  The student understands the professional, ethical, and legal responsibilities in architectural design. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate a positive, productive work ethic by performing assigned tasks as directed;

(B)  apply ethical reasoning to a variety of situations in order to make ethical decisions;

(C)  exhibit ethical practices as defined by the architectural industry; and

(D)  comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations in a consistent manner.

(6)  The student participates in a supervised architectural design experience. The student is expected to:

(A)  conduct, document, and evaluate learning activities in a supervised architectural design experience;

(B)  develop advanced technical knowledge and skills related to the student's occupational objective;

(C)  read and interpret appropriate schematics, charts, graphs, drawings, construction documents, directions, manuals, bulletins, and regulations;

(D)  design multimedia communication and rendering products using appropriate architectural design processes and techniques;

(E)  produce multimedia communication and rendering products using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, and materials;

(F)  evaluate strengths and weaknesses in technical skill proficiency; and

(G)  collect representative work samples.

Source: The provisions of this §130.71 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 41 TexReg 614.


§130.72. Extended Practicum in Interior Design (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grade 12. The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the Architecture and Construction Career Cluster. Prerequisite: Interior Design II. Corequisite: Practicum in Interior Design. This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Interior Design and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Architecture and Construction Career Cluster focuses on designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.

(3)  Extended Practicum in Interior Design is an occupationally specific course designed to provide job-specific skills through laboratory training, job shadowing, or work situations in areas compatible with identified career goals in interior design. In addition, students will be expected to develop knowledge and skills related to housing, furnishings, and equipment construction or equipment management and services.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  participate in a paid or unpaid, laboratory- or work-based application of previously studied knowledge and skills related to interior design;

(B)  participate in training, education, or preparation for licensure, certification, or other relevant credentials to prepare for employment;

(C)  demonstrate professional standards and personal qualities needed to be employable such as self-discipline, positive attitude, integrity, leadership, appreciation for diversity, customer service, work ethic, and adaptability with increased fluency;

(D)  employ teamwork and conflict-management skills with increased fluency to achieve collective goals; and

(E)  employ planning and time-management skills and tools with increased fluency to enhance results and complete work tasks.

(2)  The student applies professional communications strategies. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate verbal and non-verbal communication consistently in a clear, concise, and effective manner;

(B)  apply active listening skills to obtain and clarify information;

(C)  create and deliver formal and informal presentations effectively;

(D)  analyze, interpret, and effectively communicate information, data, and observations; and

(E)  observe and interpret verbal and nonverbal cues and behaviors to enhance communication.

(3)  The student implements advanced problem-solving methods. The student is expected to:

(A)  employ critical-thinking skills with increased fluency both independently and in groups to solve problems and make decisions;

(B)  analyze elements of problems to develop creative and innovative solutions; and

(C)  conduct technical research to gather information necessary for decision making.

(4)  The student understands and applies proper safety and security techniques in the workplace. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate understanding of and consistently follow workplace safety rules and regulations;

(B)  apply safety rules in performing various workplace procedures according to industry standards; and

(C)  demonstrate safe and skillful tool care and use.

(5)  The student understands the professional, ethical, and legal responsibilities in interior design. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate a positive, productive work ethic by performing assigned tasks as directed;

(B)  apply ethical reasoning to a variety of situations in order to make ethical decisions;

(C)  exhibit ethical practices as defined by the housing, furnishings, and equipment industries and

(D)  comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations in a consistent manner.

(6)  The student participates in a supervised interior design experience. The student is expected to:

(A)  conduct, document, and evaluate learning activities in a supervised interior design experience;

(B)  develop advanced technical knowledge and skills related to the student's occupational objective;

(C)  apply elements and principles of design for coordinating furnishings with advanced proficiency;

(D)  identify characteristics of materials and workmanship in relationship to appearance, performance, use, and care of furnishings;

(E)  demonstrate advanced procedures for the care and maintenance of different types of furnishings and equipment;

(F)  determine appropriate use of accessories, lighting, materials, and space in various environments;

(G)  arrange furniture and equipment to accommodate floor plans to meet needs and wants;

(H)  apply knowledge of design application, selection, and construction to complete furnishings projects;

(I)  evaluate strengths and weaknesses in technical skill proficiency; and

(J)  collect representative work samples.

Source: The provisions of this §130.72 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 41 TexReg 614.