Chapter 130. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Career and Technical Education

Subchapter L. Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security


Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter L issued under the Texas Education Code, §§7.102(c)(4), 28.002, 28.00222, and 28.025, unless otherwise noted.


§130.331. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security, Adopted 2015.

(a)  The provisions of this subchapter shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2017-2018 school year.

(b)  No later than August 31, 2016, the commissioner of education shall determine whether instructional materials funding has been made available to Texas public schools for materials that cover the essential knowledge and skills for career and technical education as adopted in §§130.332-130.343 of this subchapter.

(c)  If the commissioner makes the determination that instructional materials funding has been made available under subsection (b) of this section, §§130.332-130.343 of this subchapter shall be implemented beginning with the 2017-2018 school year and apply to the 2017-2018 and subsequent school years.

(d)  If the commissioner does not make the determination that instructional materials funding has been made available under subsection (b) of this section, the commissioner shall determine no later than August 31 of each subsequent school year whether instructional materials funding has been made available. If the commissioner determines that instructional materials funding has been made available, the commissioner shall notify the State Board of Education and school districts that §§130.332-130.343 of this subchapter shall be implemented for the following school year.

Source: The provisions of this §130.331 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.332. Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and providing legal services, public safety, protective services, and homeland security, including professional and technical support services.

(3)  Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security introduces students to professions in law enforcement, protective services, corrections, firefighting, and emergency management services. Students will examine the roles and responsibilities of police, courts, corrections, private security, and protective agencies of fire and emergency services. The course provides students with an overview of the skills necessary for careers in law enforcement, fire service, protective services, and corrections.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to achieve business and industry employability skills standards such as attendance, on-time arrival, meeting deadlines, working toward personal/team goals every day, and ethical use of technology.

(2)  The student achieves academic knowledge and skills required for career and postsecondary education opportunities associated with the career field. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply English language arts knowledge and skills required for career and postsecondary education opportunities;

(B)  apply mathematics knowledge and skills required for career and postsecondary education opportunities; and

(C)  apply science knowledge and skills for career and postsecondary education associated with the career field.

(3)  The student uses communication skills in creating, expressing, and interpreting information and ideas, including technical terminology and information. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate effective use of grammar to develop verbal communication skills;

(B)  differentiate among speaking strategies used to communicate specific ideas to various audiences;

(C)  interpret voice quality and delivery to analyze verbal communication; and

(D)  demonstrate effective interpersonal skills necessary to communicate with coworkers and the public.

(4)  The student formulates ideas, proposals, and solutions to address problems related to the career field in order to ensure effective and efficient delivery of services. The student is expected to:

(A)  use analytical skills to formulate ideas, proposals, and solutions to problems;

(B)  formulate ideas, proposals, and solutions to ensure delivery of services; and

(C)  use critical-thinking skills to solve ethical issues identified in the career field.

(5)  The student implements measures to maintain safe and healthful working conditions in a law and public safety environment. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify, analyze, and evaluate the dangers associated with the different career fields;

(B)  create and recommend strategies for issues related to the safety and health of employees based on an assessment of a simulated workplace environment;

(C)  discuss methods for safe handling of hazardous materials;

(D)  discuss the importance of good health and physical fitness; and

(E)  demonstrate first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated external defibrillator procedures.

(6)  The student analyzes the legal responsibilities associated with roles and functions within law, public safety, corrections, and security organizations to demonstrate a commitment to professional and ethical behavior. The student is expected to:

(A)  examine real-world situations involving ethical dilemmas and professional conduct;

(B)  explain laws, regulations, and policies that govern professionals; and

(C)  recommend a strategy for responding to an unethical or illegal situation.

(7)  The student recognizes the importance of interagency cooperation. The student is expected to:

(A)  discuss the importance of police, fire, emergency medical services, court, corrections, and security systems working together to protect the public;

(B)  examine the roles and responsibilities of first responders;

(C)  identify jurisdictional problems that may arise as multiple agencies work together; and

(D)  differentiate the roles of private security and public law enforcement agencies.

(8)  The student understands the historical and philosophical development of criminal law. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the sources and origin of law in the United States;

(B)  explain the impact of the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights on criminal law in regard to the rights of citizens;

(C)  differentiate between crimes classified as felonies or misdemeanors and the punishments for each;

(D)  analyze the essential elements and classifications of a crime;

(E)  identify problems commonly associated with the enforcement of criminal laws; and

(F)  identify the process by which laws are enacted.

(9)  The student identifies the roles of the public safety professional. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify career opportunities in federal, state, county, and municipal law enforcement agencies;

(B)  identify the education and training required for various levels of law enforcement;

(C)  discuss the history of policing in the United States;

(D)  identify the roles and responsibilities of law enforcement professionals;

(E)  analyze the impact of constitutional law on police as it relates to arrest, use of force, searches, and seizure;

(F)  examine the role of emergency medical services in public safety; and

(G)  identify how public safety professionals manage the stress related to these jobs.

(10)  The student identifies the roles and functions of court systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify career opportunities in the court systems;

(B)  identify the levels and functions of criminal courts;

(C)  examine the roles of the courtroom work groups such as judges, prosecutors, defense counsel, and bailiffs;

(D)  explain pretrial and courtroom procedures; and

(E)  identify types of sentencing and sentencing rules.

(11)  The student identifies the roles and functions of the correctional system. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain career opportunities available in the correctional system, including probation and parole;

(B)  explain the duties and responsibilities of correctional officers;

(C)  recognize the history of prisons in the United States;

(D)  explain the differences between jails and prisons;

(E)  identify the levels of security in prisons and jails; and

(F)  explain the constitutional rights of inmates in prisons and jails.

(12)  The student identifies the roles and functions of private security systems and agencies. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the career opportunities available in private security;

(B)  discuss the history and importance of private security in the United States; and

(C)  examine the relationship between private security and public safety agencies.

(13)  The student identifies the roles and functions of fire protection services. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the career opportunities in fire protection services;

(B)  explain the duties and responsibilities of firefighters;

(C)  recognize the importance of the operation of 911 and computer-aided dispatch systems; and

(D)  explain the relationships among police, fire, and emergency medical services.

(14)  The student identifies the roles and functions of student community organizations that support or provide additional information and guidance to those interested in law, public safety, corrections, and protective services. The student is expected to:

(A)  research and participate in community organizations such as SkillsUSA, Law Enforcement Explorer Scouts, and National Technical Honor Society; and

(B)  identify community outreach organizations such as Citizens on Patrol; local student police organizations; or national student police organizations.

Source: The provisions of this §130.332 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.333. Correctional Services (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and providing legal services, public safety, protective services, and homeland security, including professional and technical support services.

(3)  In Correctional Services, students prepare for certification required for employment as a municipal, county, state, or federal correctional officer. Students will learn the role and responsibilities of a county or municipal correctional officer; discuss relevant rules, regulations, and laws of municipal, county, state, or federal facilities; and discuss defensive tactics, restraint techniques, and first aid procedures as used in the municipal, county, state, or federal correctional setting. Students will analyze rehabilitation and alternatives to institutionalization for inmates.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to achieve business and industry employability skills standards such as attendance, on-time arrival, meeting deadlines, working toward personal/team goals every day, and ethical use of technology.

(2)  The student researches the history of correctional services in the municipal, county, state, or federal setting. The student is expected to:

(A)  examine the history of corrections such as municipal, county, state, and federal;

(B)  examine the rules of conduct and disciplinary action guidelines for employees of municipal, county, state, or federal correctional facilities;

(C)  analyze personal responsibilities, including preferences, to determine requirements for employment in municipal, county, state, or federal correctional services; and

(D)  effectively search methods to locate potential employment opportunities in municipal, county, state, or federal correctional services.

(3)  The student recognizes professional standards and ethical responsibilities in the municipal, county, state, or federal correctional facilities. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify employer expectations such as effective verbal communication skills; professional conduct; knowledge of laws, regulations, and policies; punctuality and attendance; initiative; cooperation; time management; and sensitivity to and value for diversity;

(B)  identify professional standards in municipal, county, state, or federal correctional facilities such as dress, grooming, and personal protective equipment as appropriate; and leadership and teamwork when collaborating with others to accomplish goals and objectives; and

(C)  analyze the ethical responsibilities of correctional officers to ensure protections of rights.

(4)  The student uses verbal communication skills necessary for municipal, county, state, or federal correctional officers. The student is expected to:

(A)  define technical concepts and vocabulary associated with municipal, county, state, or federal correctional services through effective verbal communication; and

(B)  contribute to group discussions and meetings by demonstrating active listening and effective speaking skills.

(5)  The student performs active listening skills to obtain and clarify information. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply listening skills to obtain and clarify information provided in verbal communication; and

(B)  demonstrate communication skills to explain the meaning of technical vocabulary concepts related to correctional services.

(6)  The student uses first aid, infection control, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a correctional facility. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate first aid procedures, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and automated external defibrillator use in a simulated emergency situation;

(B)  comply with standard precautions as they relate to infection control; and

(C)  use special requirements for handling hazardous materials to maintain a safe working environment.

(7)  The student recognizes constitutional laws and laws of correctional systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply constitutional laws, including laws of arrest, to execute official correctional service duties while respecting citizen rights;

(B)  explore the impact of the U.S. legal system on the correctional system;

(C)  differentiate between the civil and criminal justice systems and explain how change impacts correctional services;

(D)  use the appropriate techniques to manage crisis situations to protect individuals and society;

(E)  execute protocols associated with arrest, search, and seizure using the statutes set forth by the Fourth Amendment;

(F)  summarize the rights of an individual being interrogated under the Fifth Amendment;

(G)  examine trial, jury, and due process rights; and

(H)  state the conditions under which citizens and non-citizens of the United States may be interrogated in the correctional environment.

(8)  The student models behaviors during interactions with prisoners that demonstrate concern for individuals with disabilities. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply the appropriate procedures for use with individuals who have mental disorders, physical disabilities, communication disorders, and atypical behaviors;

(B)  execute protocols to provide appropriate assistance to people with disabilities and impairments; and

(C)  analyze the impact of the Americans with Disabilities Act on inmates and correctional staff.

(9)  The student uses conflict resolution skills and knowledge to resolve conflicts among individuals in correctional environments. The student is expected to:

(A)  examine the origins of conflict and the needs that motivate behavior;

(B)  analyze different responses to conflict and the results generated;

(C)  use principle-centered conflict resolution processes in order to resolve conflicts; and

(D)  interpret visual and vocal cues to comprehend information received such as from body language, eye movement, voice tone, and voice inflection.

(10)  The student analyzes hostile situations and executes conflict management strategies to take charge of problems that arise in correctional settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  review security post procedures in a correctional facility;

(B)  explain the importance of a perimeter security system;

(C)  appraise situations and select the appropriate degree of force;

(D)  complete steps involved in pre-event planning to respond to crisis situations; and

(E)  perform appropriate crisis management to protect individual and societal rights.

(11)  The student applies technical skill procedures of correctional staff to effectively manage day-to-day operations of correctional facilities. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate knowledge of policies and procedures for inmate supervision and discipline;

(B)  demonstrate protocol designed to restrain individuals placed into custody without violating personal rights or jeopardizing personal safety;

(C)  develop emergency plans and procedures for correctional facilities;

(D)  describe the process for providing food services and the critical elements to ensure an effective operation;

(E)  describe the steps for processing inmates such as reception, orientation, and classification;

(F)  conduct a simulated parole interview;

(G)  analyze prisoner re-entry programs and the effect of the programs on the community; and

(H)  describe the importance of public relations as related to communities and citizens.

(12)  The student identifies basic organizational models for municipal, county, state, or federal correctional facilities and the officer's role in maintaining order and safety. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify three primary models of detention facilities;

(B)  identify the role and core responsibilities of the officer in the detention facility; and

(C)  recognize issues involving prisoners' constitutional rights.

(13)  The student recognizes issues related to human behavior and relations in a detention facility. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the importance of ethical judgment and behavior in the criminal justice system;

(B)  recognize issues involved with human relations between staff and prisoners;

(C)  compare and contrast stress and stress-related issues for correctional personnel;

(D)  evaluate the process of promoting cultural awareness at a municipal, county, state, or federal facility; and

(E)  identify state and federal laws related to civil rights, sexual harassment, and liability issues for detention personnel.

(14)  The student identifies methods of screening for and addressing injurious prisoner behavior. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify various methods of screening for suicide risks;

(B)  recognize procedures for preventing suicide among prisoners and for responding to suicide attempts; and

(C)  identify various methods for determining, classifying, and dealing with intoxicated prisoners in the correctional setting.

(15)  The student recognizes intake procedures for a detention facility. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify general booking procedures such as basic orientation procedures, fingerprinting, report writing, and documentation of prisoner information;

(B)  identify steps in the prisoner admission process; and

(C)  recognize the process for releasing prisoners.

(16)  The student recognizes various inmate health care issues and processes. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify issues and symptoms involving persons with a variety of mental impairments at a detention facility;

(B)  identify questions to ask when screening prisoners for mental illness and recognize methods for interacting and communicating with prisoners who may be mentally ill;

(C)  recognize processes for maintaining inmate health records and understand health risks of communicable diseases; and

(D)  recognize legal aspects of health care in a detention facility.

(17)  The student identifies methods of providing various prisoner services. The student is expected to identify processes for issuing prisoner supplies and recognize issues involving prisoner food service, visitations, prisoner correspondence, and telephone usage.

(18)  The student recognizes prisoner and facility security protocols. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify issues involving inmate counts;

(B)  demonstrate procedures for inventorying prisoner's property;

(C)  identify the process of searching male and female prisoners;

(D)  identify the processes and procedures for searching cells and common areas within a correctional facility; and

(E)  identify issues involving facility security.

(19)  The student recognizes the appropriate actions to take in emergency situations at a detention facility. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify procedures for responding to a riot and disturbance in a municipal, county, state, or federal correctional facility;

(B)  identify procedures for responding to events such as assaults, fires, medical emergencies, prisoner escapes, and hostage situations;

(C)  recognize issues in dealing with disruptive inmates and groups; and

(D)  identify procedures for escape attempts and escapes.

(20)  The student identifies report-writing methods and courtroom procedures. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the process involved with writing reports;

(B)  identify appropriate courtroom attire and demeanor; and

(C)  recognize procedures for preparing for courtroom testimony.

(21)  The student evaluates situations requiring the use of force. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate the use of the force continuum in simulated situations requiring varied degrees of force; and

(B)  explain the guidelines and restrictions imposed by state and federal governments related to the use of deadly force.

(22)  The student analyzes procedures and protocols for self-defense in homeland security and protective services. The student is expected to demonstrate self-defense and defensive tactics such as ready stance and escort positions, strikes, kicks, punches, handcuffing, and searching.

Source: The provisions of this §130.333 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.334. Firefighter I (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and providing legal services, public safety, protective services, and homeland security, including professional and technical support services.

(3)  Firefighter I introduces students to firefighter safety and development. Students will analyze Texas Commission on Fire Protection rules and regulations, proper incident reporting and records, proper use of personal protective equipment, and the principles of fire safety.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to achieve business and industry employability skills standards such as attendance, on-time arrival, meeting deadlines, working toward personal/team goals every day, and ethical use of technology.

(2)  The student uses communication skills as related to fire management. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate the use of speech and written communication platforms common to fire management services;

(B)  practice steps involved in using radio communication for fire management;

(C)  apply the Incident Command System to manage emergencies; and

(D)  apply protocols in emergency management response when working at an accident scene.

(3)  The student executes safety procedures and protocols associated with fire management services. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply local, state, and federal regulations pertaining to safety issues;

(B)  apply protocols for handling hazardous materials at the awareness level; and

(C)  practice personal safety procedures.

(4)  The student comprehends the steps to develop an institutional professional growth plan to develop team building and leadership skills common for fire management systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  recognize techniques for functioning within a group environment; and

(B)  demonstrate model leadership within fire management.

(5)  The student applies laws, ordinances, regulations, and rules as defined by the Texas Commission on Fire Protection Certification Curriculum Manual to perform duties within a set of rules or protocols. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the correct laws and rules applicable to basic firefighter certification by the Texas Commission on Fire Protection;

(B)  review the Texas Commission on Fire Protection requirements for certification as a basic firefighter as stated in the Standards Manual for Fire Protection Personnel;

(C)  identify the various levels of firefighter certifications by the Texas Commission on Fire Protection as stated in the Standards Manual for Fire Protection Personnel;

(D)  identify the levels of instructor certification by the Texas Commission on Fire Protection as stated in the Standards Manual for Fire Protection Personnel; and

(E)  describe responsibilities of a firefighter as required by the National Fire Protection Association 1500: Standard on Fire Department Occupational Safety and Health Program.

(6)  The student describes the stages of a fire, the process of combustion, and the appropriate action to be taken for extinguishment. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the four products of combustion commonly found in structural fires that create a life hazard;

(B)  define terms such as fire, flash point, ignition temperature, fire point, flammable (explosive) range, boiling point, oxidation, pyrolysis, reducing agent, vaporization, combustion, vapor density, and specific gravity;

(C)  describe the process of thermal layering that occurs in structural fires and how to avoid disturbing the normal layering of heat;

(D)  define fire triangle and fire tetrahedron;

(E)  describe heat energy sources such as chemical, electrical, mechanical, and nuclear;

(F)  identify the stages of fire development;

(G)  explain the special conditions that occur during a fire's growth such as flameover, rollover, flashover, thermal layering, and backdraft; and

(H)  identify the units of heat measurement and how to convert units.

(7)  The student describes the methods of heat transfer. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe methods of heat transfer such as conduction, convection, and radiation; and

(B)  describe examples of heat transfer in fire emergencies such as conduction, convection, and radiation.

(8)  The student analyzes the physical states of matter in which fuels are commonly found. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the physical states of matter in which fuels are commonly found such as solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels;

(B)  explain terms related to the combustion process such as specific gravity, vapor density, and the theory of surface-to-mass ratio; and

(C)  identify narcotic asphyxiant gases and irritants common in smoke.

(9)  The student comprehends the fire extinguishment theory. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the fire extinguishment theory; and

(B)  analyze methods of extinguishment such as temperature reduction, fuel removal, oxygen exclusion, and inhibiting chemical reaction.

(10)  The student describes the characteristics of water as it relates to fire extinguishing potential. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the law of thermodynamics as it relates to specific heat, latent heat, and heat flow; and

(B)  compare the advantages and disadvantages of water as an extinguishing agent.

(11)  The student analyzes the internal systems that sustain life in the human body and identifies the physical requirements of a self-contained breathing apparatus wearer. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the internal systems that sustain life in the human body such as the respiratory and cardiovascular systems;

(B)  describe the National Fire Protection Association standards applicable to the self-contained breathing apparatus;

(C)  identify the firefighter's physical requirements for wearing a self-contained breathing apparatus;

(D)  identify respiratory hazards during firefighting that require the use of respiratory protection;

(E)  identify the different types of self-contained breathing apparatus; and

(F)  describe the safety features and function of the open circuit self-contained breathing apparatus.

(12)  The student demonstrates confidence in performing firefighting skills while wearing a self-contained breathing apparatus. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the safety requirements when using the self-contained breathing apparatus;

(B)  describe how to calculate the air supply duration in the cylinder;

(C)  describe the safety rules when wearing the self-contained breathing apparatus;

(D)  describe the uses and limitations of the self-contained breathing apparatus;

(E)  demonstrate the various methods of donning and doffing the self-contained breathing apparatus while wearing protective clothing;

(F)  demonstrate the replacement of an expended cylinder on a self-contained breathing apparatus assembly with a full cylinder;

(G)  demonstrate rescue procedures without compromising the rescuer's respiratory protection such as rescuing a firefighter with functioning respiratory protection, a firefighter without functioning respiratory protection, or a civilian without respiratory protection;

(H)  perform firefighting skills while wearing the self-contained breathing apparatus with a fully charged cylinder;

(I)  demonstrate the use of the self-contained breathing apparatus to manage a restricted passage in conditions of obscured visibility; and

(J)  demonstrate emergency procedures to be used in the event of failure of the self-contained breathing apparatus.

(13)  The student demonstrates inspection, care, and testing procedures for the self-contained breathing apparatus. The student is expected to:

(A)  document routine maintenance for the self-contained breathing apparatus; and

(B)  describe the use of an air supply system for recharging an air cylinder and cylinder testing maintenance of a self-contained breathing apparatus.

(14The student identifies the types and components of fire service protective clothing and personal protective equipment. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the various types of fire service protective clothing;

(B)  identify the different components of structural firefighting protective equipment and their functions;

(C)  demonstrate the correct procedures for inspection and maintenance of personal protective equipment;

(D)  describe the limitations of personal protective equipment in providing protection to firefighters;

(E)  explain the physical limitations of a firefighter working in a personal protective ensemble; and

(F)  demonstrate the donning and doffing of personal protective equipment such as helmet with eye protection, hood, boots, gloves, protective coat and trousers, self-contained breathing apparatus, and personal alert safety system device.

(15)  The student demonstrates the proper testing and operation of a personal alert safety system device. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the proper operation of a personal alert safety system; and

(B)  demonstrate the proper testing of a personal alert safety system.

(16)  The student recognizes all aspects of the fire department organization. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify aspects of the fire department organization;

(B)  explain the firefighter's role as a member of the fire department;

(C)  analyze the rules and regulations common to most fire departments;

(D)  identify the mission of the fire service and of the local fire department according to the authority having jurisdiction;

(E)  describe the function of a standard operating system and the responsibilities of a firefighter relating to compliance with the provisions of occupational safety and health programs; and

(F)  explain the components of a member assistance program.

(17)  The student recognizes common types of accidents and injuries and their causes. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the elements of a personnel accountability system and the application of the system at an incident;

(B)  identify potential long-term firefighter health considerations of exposure to products of combustion;

(C)  identify common types of accidents or injuries such as those occurring at the emergency scene, responding to and returning from calls on fire apparatus, in personal vehicles, at the fire station, at other on-duty locations, and during training; and

(D)  demonstrate techniques for action when trapped or disoriented in a fire situation or in a hostile environment.

(18)  The student describes the handling of different types of accidents and hazards. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the procedures for terminating utility services to a building;

(B)  explain hazards that exist and describe procedures to be used in electrical emergencies;

(C)  describe the safe handling and operation of hand and power tools;

(D)  describe safety procedures for fire service lighting equipment such as power supply (portable or mounted), lights, cords, and connectors; and

(E)  recognize the procedures for the use of safety equipment such as seat belts, ear protection, eye protection, and other safety equipment provided for protection while riding on apparatus.

(19)  The student identifies safety procedures for ensuring a safe environment. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify protective equipment and describe its uses;

(B)  recognize traffic and scene control devices;

(C)  identify structure fire and roadway emergency scene potential hazards;

(D)  describe solutions to mitigate potential hazards; and

(E)  describe procedures for safe operation at emergency scenes.

Source: The provisions of this §130.334 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.335. Firefighter II (Three Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Firefighter I. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security. Students shall be awarded three credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and providing legal services, public safety, protective services, and homeland security, including professional and technical support services.

(3)  Firefighter II is the second course in a series for students studying firefighter safety and development. Students will understand Texas Commission on Fire Protection rules and regulations, proper incident reporting and records, proper use of personal protective equipment, and the principles of fire safety. Students will demonstrate proper use of fire extinguishers, ground ladders, fire hoses, and water supply apparatus systems.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to achieve business and industry employability skills standards such as attendance, on-time arrival, meeting deadlines, working toward personal/team goals every day, and ethical use of technology.

(2)  The student uses information technology applications as they pertain to fire management situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply protocols for managing emergency situations using radio equipment, computer technology, and public address and warning systems; and

(B)  demonstrate use of word-processing and spreadsheet software in fire management services.

(3)  The student evaluates behaviors, strategies, and protocols that demonstrate an understanding of duties while responding to a variety of emergency incidents. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify response procedures to emergency incidents; and

(B)  apply response procedures to simulated emergency incidents.

(4)  The student describes the characteristics and applications for the classes of extinguishers. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the classification of types of fires as they relate to the use of portable fire extinguishers and the materials involved in each class of fire;

(B)  identify the appropriate fire extinguisher for each class of fire;

(C)  identify and describe fire extinguisher characteristics and operations; and

(D)  describe and demonstrate the operation of fire extinguishers using Pull Aim Squeeze Sweep (PASS).

(5)  The student explains the purpose of the National Fire Protection Association standards applicable to fire service ground ladders. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the materials used in ladder construction and the features;

(B)  describe and demonstrate inspection and maintenance procedures for different types of ground ladders and describe procedures for conducting an annual service test on ground ladders;

(C)  identify the load capacities for ground ladders;

(D)  identify and select a ladder for a given task;

(E)  demonstrate raising and positioning ground ladders;

(F)  describe and demonstrate securing a ladder;

(G)  explain and demonstrate proper ladder climbing techniques while transporting tools and equipment or assisting a person with a simulated injury; and

(H)  demonstrate the deployment of a roof ladder on a pitched roof.

(6)  The student describes the purpose of the National Fire Protection Association standards applicable to fire service hoses and reviews the procedures for care, maintenance, and inspection of fire hoses, couplings, nozzles, and water valves. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and describe the use and construction of fire hoses and couplings;

(B)  explain the application of each size and type of hose on a pumper as required to be carried by National Fire Protection Association 1901;

(C)  demonstrate the methods of connecting fire hose couplings;

(D)  demonstrate the one- and two-person methods of connecting, dismantling, and rolling various sizes of hose lines;

(E)  demonstrate advancing dry hose lines and charged attack lines of different sizes;

(F)  demonstrate methods of hose load finishes;

(G)  describe and demonstrate extending a section of hose and replacing damaged sections of hose using proper safety equipment such as clothing for performing overhaul activities; and

(H)  describe the methods of washing and drying a fire hose.

(7)  The student explains requirements for the production of effective fire streams. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify, define, and demonstrate characteristics of fire streams;

(B)  identify the type, design, operation, required nozzle pressure, and flow of a given selection of nozzles and tips;

(C)  demonstrate the proper use of nozzles, hose appliances, water valves, adapters, and tools;

(D)  identify various types of nozzles and their components; and

(E)  identify terms relating to the principles of fire service hydraulics.

(8)  The student identifies water supply sources and methods to move water from the supply source to the fire. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the operation of fire hydrants such as fully opened fire hydrants and closed fire hydrants;

(B)  identify the National Fire Protection Association hydrant color code;

(C)  describe making a hydrant-to-pumper connection;

(D)  explain the hazards involved when the hydrant-to-pumper connection is not properly sealed; and

(E)  describe the apparatus, equipment, and appliances required to provide water at rural locations.

(9)  The student explains the duties of a firefighter after a fire. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain how debris is handled from fires, including house fires and chemical fires;

(B)  describe the duties for gathering information that may lead to the determination of the fire cause;

(C)  identify the proper procedure for restoration of the premises after a fire; and

(D)  describe the duties for fire and security surveillance during and after the fire.

Source: The provisions of this §130.335 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.336. Law Enforcement I (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and providing legal services, public safety, protective services, and homeland security, including professional and technical support services.

(3)  Law Enforcement I is an overview of the history, organization, and functions of local, state, and federal law enforcement. Students will understand the role of constitutional law at local, state, and federal levels; the U.S. legal system; criminal law; and law enforcement terminology and the classification and elements of crime.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to achieve business and industry employability skills standards such as attendance, on-time arrival, meeting deadlines, working toward personal/team goals every day, and ethical use of technology.

(2)  The student explores the legal authorities pertaining to law enforcement officers' use of force. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify key terminology relating to the use of force and explain the legal authorities and the justification for use of force;

(B)  analyze the deciding factors for use of force when effecting an arrest;

(C)  analyze circumstances that are high risks for officers;

(D)  analyze various force options or alternatives to increase the student's awareness of various force options or alternatives available to peace officers;

(E)  discuss force options available to peace officers; and

(F)  examine elements that an officer must recognize and control in every encounter.

(3)  The student uses verbal and nonverbal communication skills necessary for law enforcement. The student is expected to:

(A)  relate the meaning of technical concepts and vocabulary associated with law enforcement;

(B)  interpret facial expressions, voice quality and delivery, gestures, and body positioning as related to nonverbal communication;

(C)  interpret voice quality and delivery such as combination of pitch, tone, and wording;

(D)  recognize diversity in culture;

(E)  employ active listening skills; and

(F)  contribute to group discussions and meetings.

(4)  The student demonstrates a working knowledge of the laws, methods, and techniques relative to accident investigation:

(A)  produce a crash report involving two or more vehicles in an accident;

(B)  apply laws associated with accident investigation;

(C)  research procedures for responding to an accident scene and how to maintain control of an accident scene; and

(D)  demonstrate how to maintain traffic control at an accident scene.

(5)  The student understands ethical behavior standards required for law enforcement personnel. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the role of the U.S. Constitution in relation to the development and implementation of law enforcement;

(B)  evaluate individual ethical behavior standards;

(C)  analyze legal and ethical behavior standards protecting citizens' constitutional rights;

(D)  demonstrate strategies to enhance public trust; and

(E)  explain the mission of law enforcement in protecting a democratic society.

(6)  The student explores the U.S. legal system and the requirements for law enforcement. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain how citizens are protected by constitutional laws of local, state, and federal courts;

(B)  analyze the impact of Supreme Court decisions such as Mapp v. Ohio, Terry v. Ohio, and Tennessee v. Garner;

(C)  analyze the similarities, differences, and interactions between local, state, and federal court systems;

(D)  illustrate the progression of a case as it moves through local, state, and federal jurisdictions; and

(E)  compare the characteristics of civil and criminal court systems.

(7)  The student analyzes custody and interrogation as they relate to the U.S. Supreme court decision in Miranda v. Arizona. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate the application of the constitutional rights, using the Miranda warning requirements for both adult and juvenile suspects;

(B)  explain the additional requirements above the Miranda warnings for juvenile suspects, offenders, and witnesses; and

(C)  demonstrate a non-custodial and custodial interview and interrogation.

(8)  The student analyzes procedural and substantive criminal law. The student is expected to:

(A)  define crime categories and respective punishments according to the Texas Penal Code;

(B)  analyze the elements of criminal acts according to Texas laws, including Alcoholic Beverage Code, Family Code, Penal Code, Health and Safety Code, and Criminal Code of Procedure;

(C)  differentiate mala prohibita and mala in se; and

(D)  analyze types of criminal defenses.

(9)  The student analyzes law related to victims and witnesses. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the rights of victims of crimes and witnesses to crime laws such as the Victim and Witness Protection Act of 1982, the Victims of Crime Act of 1984, the Victim's Rights and Restitution Act, the Child Victims' Bill of Rights of 1990, and the Victim Rights Clarification Act of 1997;

(B)  analyze the psychological, social, and economic impact of crime on the victim such as:

(i)  identifying the elements of a crisis reaction, the phases of a victim's reaction to a crime, the ripple effect of crime victimization, and crisis intervention; and

(ii)  identifying and discussing the potential for secondary victimization by the criminal justice system and how to avoid it; and

(C)  identify statutory responsibilities relating to victims' rights such as:

(i)  identifying the legal basis of law enforcement's responsibilities to victims' rights;

(ii)  summarizing legal requirement for providing victims written notice; and

(iii)  explaining rights granted to victims of crime.

(10)  The student executes protocols and procedures protecting the rights of juvenile offenders and victims. The student is expected to:

(A)  discuss juvenile law as it relates to the steps in processing status offenses of juveniles; and

(B)  demonstrate the procedure for holding conferences with juveniles and parents or guardians.

(11)  The student analyzes the steps in handling family violence calls involving Temporary Ex Parte Protective Orders, Protective Orders, and Magistrate's Orders for Emergency Protection and the procedures for responding to family violence. The student is expected to:

(A)  understand the dynamics and legal issues of family violence and child abuse such as:

(i)  explaining common characteristics of family violence offenders and describing the cycle of abuse phases;

(ii)  discussing the types of abuse often occurring in family violence incidences, explaining some barriers victims face when attempting to leave an abusive relationship; and

(iii)  defining terminology associated with family violence related to Texas Family Code, Title 4, for Protective Orders and Family Violence; and

(B)  evaluate the recommended steps in handling family violence calls involving Temporary Ex Parte Protective Orders, protective orders, and Magistrate's Order for Emergency Protection such as:

(i)  identifying the legal requirements for investigation of domestic abuse and child abuse or neglect and medical treatment and examinations for both;

(ii)  designing a plan on how to handle family violence situations and procedures for conducting preliminary investigations; and

(iii)  demonstrating how to provide and explain community resources and referrals to victims of family violence.

(12)  The student explains laws associated with the Texas Health and Safety Code. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify current commonly abused drugs in society;

(B)  research the effects of substances as it applies to the Texas Health and Safety Code; and

(C)  summarize the procedures for handling drugs, dangerous drugs, and controlled substances.

(13)  The student summarizes the philosophy and concepts that influence the development and implementation of a community-oriented police program. The student is expected to:

(A)  define community-oriented policing; and

(B)  evaluate the skills needed to be a successful community-oriented police officer.

(14)  The student uses field note-taking and report-writing skills to complete a police call sheet, an incident report, and a supplemental report. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the components of a police call sheet, an incident report, and a supplemental report;

(B)  explain why a police call sheet, an incident report, and a supplemental report are legal documents;

(C)  demonstrate obtaining the appropriate information for a police call sheet, an incident report, and a supplemental report; and

(D)  write a police call sheet, an incident report, and a supplemental report using clear, concise, and legible entries.

(15)  The student analyzes reasonable suspicion and probable cause for motor vehicle traffic stops. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply techniques used to assess risk in vehicle stops;

(B)  understand and analyze traffic laws contained in the Texas Transportation Code and their applications;

(C)  execute a simulated misdemeanor traffic stop using the seven-step violator contact method;

(D)  execute a simulated felony traffic stop with one and two patrol units;

(E)  identify if a traffic law has been violated according to the Texas Transportation Code regarding a driving situation; and

(F)  identify the regulations relating to arrest, charging procedures, notices, and promises to appear.

(16)  The student employs procedures to protect, document, and process a crime scene. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate how to lift and preserve developed latent prints from a simulated crime scene; and

(B)  demonstrate how to photograph, sketch, search, collect, document, and protect the crime scene area for further investigation.

(17)  The student demonstrates and applies a working knowledge of the detection, apprehension, and arrest of an intoxicated driver. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the laws related to driving while intoxicated and related offenses; and

(B)  discuss the development of "reasonable suspicion" for the intoxicated driver stop and temporary detention.

(18)  The student demonstrates a working knowledge of a tactical entry into a residence and building safely. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe techniques officers can use to safely approach a residence or building;

(B)  explain techniques to safely enter and search a residence or building;

(C)  demonstrate the correct techniques for entering a doorway and searching a room(s); and

(D)  demonstrate methods for clearing buildings or residences and techniques used when suspects are found inside a building or residence.

Source: The provisions of this §130.336 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.337. Law Enforcement II (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Law Enforcement I. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and providing legal services, public safety, protective services, and homeland security, including professional and technical support services.

(3)  Law Enforcement II provides the knowledge and skills necessary to prepare for a career in law enforcement. Students will understand ethical and legal responsibilities, patrol procedures, first responder roles, telecommunications, emergency equipment operations, and courtroom testimony.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to achieve business and industry employability skills standards such as attendance, on-time arrival, meeting deadlines, working toward personal/team goals every day, and ethical use of technology.

(2)  The student achieves the academic knowledge and skills required to prepare for postsecondary education and a career in law enforcement. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate the use of communication skills to evaluate body language, gestures, verbal tone, and inflection;

(B)  apply interpersonal communication skills;

(C)  apply writing skills to facilitate effective field note taking and report writing such as police incident reports;

(D)  create various scenarios that use patrol tactics to effect an arrest; and

(E)  demonstrate appropriate use of law, public safety, corrections, and security terminology.

(3)  The student uses telecommunications equipment. The student is expected to:

(A)  support the use of telecommunication mobile and handheld radio systems and current technology;

(B)  formulate simulated radio communications using phonetic alphabet and common terminology;

(C)  conduct simulated radio and data communications using mobile data computers and handheld radios;

(D)  evaluate safety concerns with the use of telecommunications equipment, including when in the presence of non-first responders and while operating vehicles;

(E)  explain the need of prioritizing calls for service; and

(F)  identify the procedures used during emergency communications incidents such as hostage incidents and active pursuits.

(4)  The student presents testimony in legal proceedings in accordance with courtroom procedures. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the roles of the courtroom work group;

(B)  analyze the importance of reviewing field notes, reports, and evidence prior to pre-trial meeting;

(C)  apply proper explanation for the introduction of evidence for admission into a trial;

(D)  analyze effective courtroom testimony;

(E)  demonstrate an understanding of the importance of professionalism in demeanor and attire as a witness; and

(F)  discuss the importance of a pre-trial meeting with a prosecutor.

(5)  The student recognizes the importance of using interpersonal communication techniques to resolve conflicts and reduce anger. The student is expected to:

(A)  examine interpersonal communication techniques used in law enforcement;

(B)  distinguish between passive, passive-aggressive, aggressive, and assertive behavior;

(C)  discuss strategies for dealing with difficult people; and

(D)  examine factors that contribute to a person's hostility.

(6)  The student examines the techniques used to manage crisis situations and maintain public safety. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate crisis negotiations to promote the safety of individuals and the general public;

(B)  participate in a simulated scenario as a crisis negotiation team member;

(C)  demonstrate effective communication techniques in a simulated crisis negotiation;

(D)  examine hostage safety considerations during a simulated crisis negotiation; and

(E)  differentiate between public safety and individual rights during crisis negotiation.

(7)  The student understands techniques to foster public cooperation for victims in a variety of law enforcement situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate procedures for advising crime victims' legal recourse;

(B)  explain step-by-step court procedures for suspects, victims, and witnesses entering the system;

(C)  explain the procedures for providing appropriate assistance to individuals with disabilities such as autism, Alzheimer's disease, hearing impairment, visual impairment, and mobility impairment;

(D)  define the steps involved in conducting the preliminary investigation of specialized crimes such as hate crimes, bullying, sexual harassment, and terroristic threat;

(E)  analyze the elements of conducting a death notification; and

(F)  interpret legal requirements of law enforcement to victims of crime.

(8)  The student analyzes procedures and protocols for domestic violence. The student is expected to:

(A)  recognize techniques to enforce domestic violence laws;

(B)  diffuse a simulated domestic violence incident; and

(C)  apply laws in making an arrest.

(9)  The student explores civil law enforcement procedures for serving writs, warrants, and summons. The student is expected to:

(A)  research civil law procedures such as attachment, garnishment, claim, and delivery;

(B)  identify limits on use of force and entry to private property during civil process service;

(C)  differentiate among domestic violence protective orders, no-contact orders, and orders to pick up children; and

(D)  identify requirements for emergency mental health evaluation.

(10)  The student analyzes local and state law enforcement procedures pertaining to alcohol and beverage laws. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain alcohol and beverage laws and procedures controlling illegal sales and consumption;

(B)  define alcoholic beverages;

(C)  differentiate between legal and illegal alcohol sales; and

(D)  identify circumstances under which alcoholic beverages may be legally consumed.

(11)  The student explores laws and procedures to enforce violations of driving while intoxicated and driving under the influence. The student is expected to:

(A)  execute and interpret tests related to driving under the influence such as the National Traffic Highway Safety Administration Standardized Field Sobriety Test and the Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus, Walk-and-Turn, and One-Leg Stand tests;

(B)  recognize and interpret indicators of impaired driving;

(C)  describe methods used to detect and apprehend drivers under the influence; and

(D)  prepare evidence and reports required to give court testimony related to driving under the influence.

(12)  The student identifies crowd control methods. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the deployment of less-than-lethal and chemical crowd control measures;

(B)  identify the need assessment of crowd management, including officer safety, surveillance, protection of life, protection of property, and requests for assistance from other officers and agencies;

(C)  demonstrate establishing perimeters for crowd control; and

(D)  explain the importance of identifying group leaders, followers, and victims.

(13)  The student evaluates situations requiring the use of force. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate the use of the force continuum in simulated situations requiring varied degrees of force;

(B)  explain the guidelines and restrictions imposed by state and federal governments related to the use of deadly force;

(C)  identify the legal authority for the use of force;

(D)  analyze and evaluate the use of less-than-lethal use of force; and

(E)  analyze and evaluate the use of deadly force.

(14)  The student describes procedures designed to safely transport a person in custody. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate a search of an individual incidental to an arrest;

(B)  demonstrate the procedures for transporting a person without violating personal rights or jeopardizing personal safety;

(C)  demonstrate different methods of restraining a person being transported; and

(D)  discuss transporting non-custodial persons and juveniles.

(15)  The student conducts interviews and interrogations of individuals ensuring protection of rights as outlined in the U.S. Constitution. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate interviewing and interrogation techniques; and

(B)  simulate interviews of rape victims, child witnesses, and child victims.

(16)  The student investigates and documents a motor vehicle accident. The student is expected to:

(A)  record simulated crash scene evidence using standard report procedures;

(B)  analyze simulated crash scene evidence using standard laws, regulations, and procedures;

(C)  perform mathematical calculations using speed, velocity, time, and distance;

(D)  draw scale diagrams of simulated collisions using templates; and

(E)  interpret crash scene evidence.

(17)  The student recognizes law enforcement roles in preparedness and response systems for disaster situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate knowledge of the incident command system;

(B)  coordinate with response partners from all levels of government and with the private sector;

(C)  evaluate incident command system applications, organizational principles and elements, positions and responsibilities, facilities and functions, and planning; and

(D)  apply Federal Emergency Management Agency Incident Command Structure to a simulated scenario.

(18)  The student explores procedures for handling and managing explosives and hazardous material incidents. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and classify hazardous materials;

(B)  respond to a simulated situation involving explosive materials using protocols and procedures designed to maintain personal and public safety;

(C)  explain procedures for responding to reports of bomb threats and suspicious objects;

(D)  conduct a simulated building and property search to locate explosive devices and materials; and

(E)  explain procedures for responding to hazardous material incidents.

(19)  The student examines law enforcement functions regarding critical infrastructure protection from potential terrorist and natural disaster threats. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze critical infrastructure protection techniques; and

(B)  develop a plan for protecting a potential target.

(20)  The student explores new and emerging technologies in law enforcement. The student is expected to:

(A)  research new technologies used in law enforcement such as robots to diffuse potential explosives; and

(B)  explain the importance of continuing education in law enforcement.

(21)  The student evaluates patrol procedures and response to calls for service encountered by first responders. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate the legal justification and the application of probable cause for first responders' actions during a response to a suspected offense or an actual offense;

(B)  simulate conducting a misdemeanor and a high-risk traffic stop;

(C)  analyze pursuit procedures such as incidents involving vehicles, motorcycles, and foot pursuits;

(D)  simulate responding to a delayed crime and a crime in progress;

(E)  simulate conducting a building search;

(F)  simulate conducting an arrest with a warrant or a warrantless arrest;

(G)  differentiate procedures when responding with one-person units, two-person units, multiple units, other agency units, and specialized units such as air, K-9, and undercover operations;

(H)  compare patrol responses when responding to offenses on-view, dispatched calls, and public information requests; and

(I)  demonstrate the importance of being safety conscious when in the role of being a first responder.

(22)  The student evaluates the importance of first responders in developing a positive community relationship. The student is expected to:

(A)  explore the development of community policing in the United States;

(B)  evaluate the role of school resource officers;

(C)  evaluate the role of neighborhood service officers;

(D)  evaluate the role of crime prevention officers such as McGruff Safe Kids, neighborhood watch programs, store front officers, and citizens on patrol;

(E)  evaluate the responsibilities of the public information officer; and

(F)  conduct a crime prevention analysis.

(23)  The student demonstrates procedures in investigating a crime scene. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the legal requirements for first responders to enter, remain, release, and return to a crime scene;

(B)  demonstrate procedures prior to entering a crime scene and securing a crime scene;

(C)  demonstrate procedures in conducting a proper search of a crime scene for evidence such as using a strip-line search, grid-quadrant search, zone-wheel search, spiral search, or base-line search;

(D)  demonstrate procedures for marking and collecting evidence found in a crime scene;

(E)  demonstrate procedures for measuring and sketching evidence and important landmarks in a crime scene;

(F)  demonstrate procedures for photographing the crime scene and evidence during the process of investigating a crime scene, including wide angle, mid-range, spatial relationship, and close-up photographs; and

(G)  demonstrate chain of custody and proper packaging of various types of evidence for transportation.

Source: The provisions of this §130.337 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.338. Criminal Investigation (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and providing legal services, public safety, protective services, and homeland security, including professional and technical support services.

(3)  Criminal Investigation is a course that introduces students to the profession of criminal investigations. Students will understand basic functions of criminal investigations and procedures and will learn how to investigate or follow up during investigations. Students will learn terminology and investigative procedures related to criminal investigation, crime scene processing, evidence collection, fingerprinting, and courtroom presentation. Through case studies and simulated crime scenes, students will collect and analyze evidence such as fingerprint analysis, bodily fluids, hairs, fibers, shoe and tire impressions, bite marks, drugs, tool marks, firearms and ammunition, blood spatter, digital evidence, and other types of evidence.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to achieve business and industry employability skills standards such as attendance, on-time arrival, meeting deadlines, working toward personal/team goals every day, and ethical use of technology.

(2)  The student explores criminal investigative procedures, investigations, and follow-up according to the profession and its job functions. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the field of criminal investigations;

(B)  compare and contrast the characteristics of an effective investigator;

(C)  examine preliminary investigations such as initial response, point of arrival, priorities, emergency situations, and protection of the crime scene;

(D)  research follow-up procedures for an investigation; and

(E)  evaluate the effectiveness of interrelationships with individuals involved in investigations such as police officers, dispatchers, prosecutors, defense counsel, physicians, coroners, medical examiners and forensic crime laboratories, citizens, witnesses, victims, complainants, and media.

(3)  The student uses proper equipment in documenting the crime scene during field investigations. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the use of field notes;

(B)  demonstrate an understanding of when, what, where, and how to take notes;

(C)  demonstrate how to effectively take notes during an investigation;

(D)  distinguish between the advantages and disadvantages of photographs and video at a crime scene and an investigation;

(E)  plan how to use digital investigative photography during an investigation at a crime scene;

(F)  collect and organize a photographic sequence of photographs of a crime scene such as injuries, tool marks, fingerprints, tire impressions, footprints, bite marks, and other related evidence;

(G)  analyze, evaluate, make inferences, and predict occurrences of events based on photographic evidence; and

(H)  formulate ideas on admissibility of photographs in a court of law.

(4)  The student uses critical-thinking and problem-solving skills to create sketches for indoor and outdoor crime scenes. The student is expected to:

(A)  create a plan and make observations before sketching a crime scene, both as an individual and as a team;

(B)  describe the elements of a crime scene sketch such as measurements, compass directions, scale of proportion, legend/key, and title;

(C)  develop a crime scene sketch using coordinates or measurements from fixed points;

(D)  summarize the crime scene by taking notes and recording details;

(E)  analyze and evaluate to assess the crime scene sketch; and

(F)  research and describe the final sketch such as finished scale drawing and computer assisted drawing.

(5)  The student explores writing effective reports for criminal investigations. The student is expected to:

(A)  distinguish among organizing information, structuring the narrative, and composing the content;

(B)  identify the importance and uses of reports;

(C)  analyze common problems with many investigative reports;

(D)  research ways to record and dictate for future report writing; and

(E)  demonstrate different ways to write a report such as in writing and computerized.

(6)  The student recognizes legal searches and the Fourth Amendment as it applies to searches. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the exclusionary rule, inevitable discovery exception, and good faith exception;

(B)  explain when an officer needs a search warrant or consent to search during an investigation;

(C)  research Terry v. Ohio and the legal ramifications it has on pat downs and frisks;

(D)  evaluate a search incident to an arrest;

(E)  describe searching during emergency situations and warrantless searches of vehicles; and

(F)  demonstrate how to conduct an inventory of a vehicle.

(7)  The student determines what search patterns should be used in exterior and interior searches of crime scenes. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the precedents that were established by the Carrol v. United States, Chambers v. Florida, Chimel v. California, Mapp v. Ohio, Terry v. Ohio, and Weeks v. United States decisions;

(B)  conduct a systematic search of a simulated crime scene for physical evidence following crime scene search patterns such as spiral, line, grid, and strip;

(C)  demonstrate how to conduct building, vehicle, suspect, and dead body searches; and

(D)  explain how police canines are used to conduct legal searches.

(8)  The student recognizes the procedures of evidence collection while maintaining the integrity of a crime scene. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast the roles of crime scene investigators, detectives, and crime scene investigators;

(B)  demonstrate the ability to work as a member of a team;

(C)  discover and recognize evidence at a simulated crime scene;

(D)  apply knowledge of the elements of criminal law that guide search and seizure of persons, property, and evidence;

(E)  outline the chain-of-custody procedure for evidence discovered in a crime scene;

(F)  demonstrate proper techniques for collecting, marking, photographing, packaging, preserving, and transporting physical evidence found at a crime scene;

(G)  explain and demonstrate the use of video and still photography to preserve a simulated crime scene; and

(H)  analyze the use of evidence in a court of law.

(9)  The student recognizes the methods to process and analyze trace evidence commonly found in a crime scene. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate how to process trace evidence such as glass, blood, paint, fibers, and hair collected in a simulated crime scene;

(B)  identify shoe and tire impressions from sample impressions;

(C)  determine the direction of a projectile by examining glass fractures;

(D)  analyze bite marks from crime scenes and investigations;

(E)  compare and contrast the microscopic characteristics of the human hair and animal hair; and

(F)  differentiate between natural and synthetic fibers.

(10)  The student analyzes collected fingerprints or impressions from a simulated crime scene. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare the three major fingerprint patterns of arches, loops, and whorls and their respective subclasses;

(B)  identify minutiae of fingerprints, including bifurcations, ending ridges, islands, dots, short ridges, and enclosures;

(C)  distinguish among patent, plastic, and latent impressions;

(D)  perform laboratory procedures for lifting latent prints on porous and nonporous objects using chemicals such as iodine, ninhydrin, silver nitrate, and cyanoacrylate resin;

(E)  perform laboratory procedures for lifting latent prints on nonporous objects using fingerprint powders such as black powder and florescent powders;

(F)  explain the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) and describe the characteristics examined in AFIS; and

(G)  compare impression evidence collected at a simulated crime scene with the known impression.

(11)  The student analyzes blood spatter at a simulated crime scene. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze blood stain patterns based on source, direction, and angle of trajectory; and

(B)  explain the method of chemically identifying and locating an invisible blood stain using reagents such as luminol.

(12)  The student explores toxicology laboratory procedures in crime labs. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the absorption, distribution, and elimination of alcohol through the human body;

(B)  research the blood alcohol laboratory procedures as they relate to blood alcohol concentration;

(C)  explain the levels of tolerance and impairment due to alcohol consumption; and

(D)  explain the precautions necessary for proper preservation of blood samples while at a crime scene.

(13)  The student explores serology laboratory procedures in criminal investigations. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain crime laboratory procedures to determine if a stain detected in a crime scene is blood; and

(B)  research methodologies used to collect and analyze other body fluids.

(14)  The student identifies drugs found at a simulated crime scene. The student is expected to:

(A)  classify controlled substances using the schedules under the Controlled Substances Act; and

(B)  identify controlled substances.

(15)  The student evaluates bullet and tool mark impressions in a criminal investigation. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the individual characteristics of tool marks;

(B)  describe the mechanism of modern firearms;

(C)  recognize characteristics of bullet and cartridge cases;

(D)  describe the composition of and method of analysis for gunshot residue and primer residue; and

(E)  recognize the type of information available through the National Integrated Ballistics Information Network.

(16)  The student calculates the time and cause of death in relationship to decomposition of the human body. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the process and timeline of rigor mortis and its role in calculating time of death;

(B)  explain post mortem lividity and its importance when processing a crime scene;

(C)  determine time of death using entomology; and

(D)  determine time and cause of death methodologies through case studies.

(17)  The student understands how physical evidence can provide a basis for questioning people about a crime and how questioning can provide leads for finding physical evidence. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the terms victim, complainant, witness, and suspect as they apply to a criminal investigation;

(B)  demonstrate interviewing and interrogating throughout an investigation;

(C)  demonstrate effective questioning techniques and positive communication skills;

(D)  analyze the importance of reading the Miranda Warnings during interviewing and interrogating; and

(E)  describe the techniques used to interview and question children and juveniles.

(18)  The student develops a suspect profile when there is not a suspect at the crime scene and a suspect is not apprehended nearby. The student is expected to:

(A)  compile information provided by victims, witnesses, and other persons likely to know about the crime or the suspect;

(B)  examine physical evidence left at the crime scene to determine a suspect profile;

(C)  identify a suspect Modus Operandi at a crime scene;

(D)  analyze computerized composite sketch applications such as Identi-Kit;

(E)  describe techniques used to create photo line ups, identification, and mug shots; and

(F)  research audio, video, and electronic surveillance.

Source: The provisions of this §130.338 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.339. Forensic Science (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. The course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry. Recommended prerequisite or corequisite: any Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster course. Students must meet the 40% laboratory and fieldwork requirement. This course satisfies a high school science graduation requirement. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and providing legal services, public safety, protective services, and homeland security, including professional and technical support services.

(3)  Forensic Science is a course that introduces students to the application of science to connect a violation of law to a specific criminal, criminal act, or behavior and victim. Students will learn terminology and procedures related to the search and examination of physical evidence in criminal cases as they are performed in a typical crime laboratory. Using scientific methods, students will collect and analyze evidence such as fingerprints, bodily fluids, hairs, fibers, paint, glass, and cartridge cases. Students will also learn the history and the legal aspects as they relate to each discipline of forensic science.

(4)  Science, as defined by the National Academy of Sciences, is the "use of evidence to construct testable explanations and predictions of natural phenomena, as well as the knowledge generated through this process." This vast body of changing and increasing knowledge is described by physical, mathematical, and conceptual models. Students should know that some questions are outside the realm of science because they deal with phenomena that are not scientifically testable.

(5)  Scientific inquiry is the planned and deliberate investigation of the natural world. Scientific methods of investigation can be experimental, descriptive, or comparative. The method chosen should be appropriate to the question being asked.

(6)  Scientific decision making is a way of answering questions about the natural world. Students should be able to distinguish between scientific decision-making methods and ethical and social decisions that involve the application of scientific information.

(7)  A system is a collection of cycles, structures, and processes that interact. All systems have basic properties that can be described in terms of space, time, energy, and matter. Change and constancy occur in systems as patterns and can be observed, measured, and modeled. These patterns help to make predictions that can be scientifically tested. Students should analyze a system in terms of its components and how these components relate to each other, to the whole, and to the external environment.

(8)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(9)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to achieve business and industry employability skills standards such as attendance, punctuality, meeting deadlines, working toward personal/team goals every day, and ethical use of technology.

(2)  The student, for at least 40% of instructional time, conducts laboratory and/or field investigations using safe, environmentally appropriate, and ethical practices. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations; and

(B)  demonstrate an understanding of the use and conservation of resources and the proper disposal or recycling of materials.

(3)  The student uses scientific methods and equipment during laboratory and field investigations. The student is expected to:

(A)  know the definition of science and understand that it has limitations, as specified in subsection (b)(4) of this section;

(B)  know that scientific hypotheses are tentative and testable statements that must be capable of being supported or not supported by observational evidence. Hypotheses of durable explanatory power that have been tested over a wide variety of conditions are incorporated into theories;

(C)  know scientific theories are based on natural and physical phenomena and are capable of being tested by multiple independent researchers. Unlike hypotheses, scientific theories are well-established and highly reliable explanations, but they may be subject to change as new areas of science and new technologies are developed;

(D)  distinguish between scientific hypotheses and scientific theories;

(E)  plan and implement descriptive, comparative, and experimental investigations, including asking questions, formulating testable hypotheses, and selecting equipment and technology;

(F)  collect and organize qualitative and quantitative data and make measurements with accuracy and precision using tools such as calculators, spreadsheet software, data-collecting probes, computers, standard laboratory glassware, microscopes, various prepared slides, stereoscopes, metric rulers, electronic balances, gel electrophoresis apparatuses, micropipettors, hand lenses, Celsius thermometers, hot plates, lab notebooks or journals, timing devices, cameras, Petri dishes, lab incubators, dissection equipment, meter sticks, and models, diagrams, or samples of biological specimens or structures;

(G)  analyze, evaluate, make inferences, and predict trends from data; and

(H)  communicate valid conclusions supported by the data through methods such as investigative reports, lab reports, labeled drawings, graphic organizers, journals, summaries, oral reports, and technology-based reports.

(4)  The student uses critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and problem solving to make informed decisions within and outside the classroom. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations, to encourage critical thinking;

(B)  communicate and apply scientific information extracted from various sources such as current events, news reports, published journal articles, and marketing materials;

(C)  draw inferences based on data related to criminal investigation;

(D)  evaluate the impact of scientific research on criminal investigation, society, and the environment;

(E)  evaluate models according to their limitations in representing biological objects or events; and

(F)  research and describe the history of science and contributions of scientists within the criminal justice system.

(5)  The student explores the history, legal aspects, and career options within forensic science. The student is expected to:

(A)  distinguish between criminalistics and criminology;

(B)  identify and illustrate roles, functions, and responsibilities of different forensic science disciplines such as serology-DNA, controlled substances, toxicology, trace evidence, firearms, fingerprints, and questioned documents;

(C)  summarize the ethical standards required of a forensic science professional;

(D)  identify and illustrate roles, functions, and responsibilities of professionals in the criminal justice system, including crime scene investigators, criminalists, attorneys, and medical examiners;

(E)  explore and demonstrate an understanding of the terminology and the procedures employed in the criminal justice system; and

(F)  illustrate the history of forensic science and recognize the major contributors in the development of forensic science.

(6)  The student recognizes the procedures of evidence collection while maintaining the integrity of a crime scene. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast the roles of forensic scientists and crime scene investigators;

(B)  demonstrate the ability to work as a member of a team;

(C)  conduct a systematic search of a simulated crime scene for physical evidence following crime scene search patterns such as spiral, line, grid, and strip;

(D)  apply knowledge of the elements of criminal law that guide search and seizure of persons, property, and evidence;

(E)  describe the elements of a crime scene sketch such as measurements, compass directions, scale of proportion, legend-key, and title;

(F)  develop a crime scene sketch using coordinates/measurements from fixed points;

(G)  outline the chain of custody procedure for evidence discovered in a crime scene; and

(H)  demonstrate proper techniques for collecting, packaging, and preserving physical evidence found at a crime scene.

(7)  The student recognizes the methods to process and analyze trace evidence commonly found in a crime scene. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate how to process trace evidence such as glass, paint, fibers, hair, soil, grass, and blood collected in a simulated crime scene;

(B)  compare and contrast the composition of various types of glass such as soda lime, borosilicate, leaded, and tempered;

(C)  determine the direction of a projectile by examining glass fractures;

(D)  define refractive index and explain how it is used in forensic glass analysis;

(E)  describe the instrumental analysis of trace evidence such as microscopy and spectrometry;

(F)  compare and contrast the microscopic characteristics of human hair and animal hair, including medulla, pigment distribution, and scales;

(G)  describe and illustrate the different microscopic characteristics used to determine the racial and somatic origin of a human hair sample;

(H)  differentiate between natural and synthetic fibers; and

(I)  describe various examinations performed in forensic paint analysis, including microscopic morphology, binder, and pigment characterization.

(8)  The student analyzes impression evidence in forensic science. The student is expected to:

(A)  compare the three major fingerprint patterns of arches, loops, and whorls and their respective subclasses;

(B)  identify the minutiae of fingerprints, including bifurcations, ending ridges, dots, short ridges, and enclosures;

(C)  distinguish among patent, plastic, and latent impressions;

(D)  perform laboratory procedures for lifting latent prints on porous and nonporous objects using chemicals such as iodine, ninhydrin, silver nitrate, and cyanoacrylate resin;

(E)  perform laboratory procedures for lifting latent prints on nonporous objects using fingerprint powders such as black powder and florescent powders;

(F)  explain the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) and describe the characteristics examined in the AFIS; and

(G)  compare impression evidence collected at a simulated crime scene with the known impression.

(9)  The student analyzes blood spatter at a simulated crime scene. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze blood stain patterns based on source, direction, and angle of trajectory; and

(B)  explain the method of chemically isolating an invisible blood stain using reagents such as luminol.

(10)  The student explores toxicology laboratory procedures in forensic science. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the absorption, distribution, and elimination of alcohol through the human body;

(B)  describe the blood alcohol laboratory procedures as they relate to blood alcohol concentration;

(C)  explain the levels of tolerance and impairment due to alcohol consumption; and

(D)  explain the precautions necessary in the forensic laboratory for proper preservation of blood samples.

(11)  The student explores serology laboratory procedures in forensic science. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain forensic laboratory procedures to determine if a stain detected in a crime scene is blood;

(B)  identify the red blood cell antigens and antibodies as they relate to human blood types;

(C)  determine genotypes and phenotypes in the human red blood cell system using Punnet Squares; and

(D)  research methodologies used to collect and analyze other body fluids.

(12)  The student analyzes deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) laboratory procedures in forensic science. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the structure of a DNA molecule and its function;

(B)  describe the steps used in extraction of DNA;

(C)  explain the analytical procedure for forensic DNA typing, including electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction, and short tandem repeat; and

(D)  interpret the components of an electropherogram.

(13)  The student identifies drugs found at a simulated crime scene. The student is expected to:

(A)  classify controlled substances using the schedules under the Controlled Substances Act; and

(B)  identify controlled substances using laboratory procedures such as microchemical tests, microscopy, chromatography, and spectrophotometry.

(14)  The student evaluates bullet and tool mark impressions in a criminal investigation. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the individual characteristics of tool marks;

(B)  describe the mechanism of modern firearms;

(C)  recognize characteristics of bullet and cartridge cases;

(D)  describe the composition of and method of analysis for gunshot residue and primer residue; and

(E)  recognize the type of information available through the National Integrated Ballistics Information Network.

(15)  The student explores principles of questioned document analysis in forensic science. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe different types of examinations performed by a questioned document examiner in a forensic laboratory, including counterfeiting, handwriting, ink, and paper analysis;

(B)  describe the security features incorporated in the U.S. currency to prevent counterfeiting;

(C)  perform handwriting comparisons of an unknown sample with exemplars by analyzing characteristics such as letter, line, and formatting; and

(D)  describe the process of ink analysis using chromatography.

(16)  The student explores principles of anthropology relevant to forensic science. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the major bones of the human skeletal system;

(B)  compare composition and structure of human bones with other animals;

(C)  describe the techniques used to excavate bones from a crime scene;

(D)  explain the characteristics of the human skeletal system indicative of specific gender, racial origin, and approximate range of age and height; and

(E)  explain the role of dental records in identification of human remains.

(17)  The student calculates the time and cause of death in relationship to decomposition of the human body. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the process and timeline of rigor mortis and its role in calculating time of death;

(B)  explain post mortem lividity and its importance when processing a crime scene;

(C)  determine time of death using entomology; and

(D)  determine time and cause of death methodologies through case studies.

Source: The provisions of this §130.339 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.340. Court Systems and Practices (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Law Enforcement I or Principles of Government or Public Administration. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and providing legal services, public safety, protective services, and homeland security, including professional and technical support services.

(3)  Court Systems and Practices is an overview of the federal and state court systems. The course identifies the roles of judicial officers and the trial processes from pretrial to sentencing and examines the types and rules of evidence. Emphasis is placed on constitutional laws for criminal procedures such as search and seizure, stop and frisk, and interrogation.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to achieve business and industry employability skills standards such as attendance, on-time arrival, meeting deadlines, working toward personal/team goals every day, and ethical use of technology.

(2)  The student examines the structure of the legal system in the United States. The student is expected to:

(A)  trace the history, structure, and function of state and federal court systems and criminal procedure;

(B)  compare and contrast the state court system and the federal court system;

(C)  explain and illustrate how jurisdiction impacts criminal charges and trial proceedings;

(D)  explain and interpret the purposes of law regarding criminal acts and behaviors;

(E)  distinguish between constitutional law, case law, statutory law, and administrative law;

(F)  identify the differences in processing a misdemeanor and felony case;

(G)  describe and interpret the impact of the grand jury process on court proceedings regarding criminal scenarios;

(H)  examine relationship of the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights upon the court system; and

(I)  describe the impact of public opinion and the legislature on the U.S. court system.

(3)  The student explores the roles and responsibilities of members of courtroom work groups. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain the roles of professionals such as the police, prosecutor, judge, victim advocates, and criminal defense attorney in the criminal process;

(B)  examine the roles and importance of members of the courtroom such as the jury, bailiff, and court reporter;

(C)  analyze the impact of the victim and the defendant upon the courtroom process; and

(D)  discuss the dynamics of assembly line justice and discretion found in court proceedings.

(4)  The student recognizes communication skills needed for courtroom policies and procedures. The student is expected to:

(A)  use communication skills to evaluate body language such as gestures, verbal tone, and inflection during testimony;

(B)  demonstrate interpersonal communication skills; and

(C)  apply writing skills to formulate effective field note taking and report writing.

(5)  The student examines the steps by which a criminal charge is processed through pretrial, trial, adjudication, and the appellate stages. The student is expected to:

(A)  examine the interaction between police and prosecutor in filing complaints and making a decision to charge such as Defenses to Prosecution and application of various definitions of intent;

(B)  explain pretrial court proceedings such as rules of discovery, challenges to evidence, and the bail process;

(C)  distinguish between direct and circumstantial evidence and burden of proof for federal and state courts;

(D)  explore the impact of pleas and plea bargaining on the trial proceedings;

(E)  identify the trial process from pretrial to sentencing;

(F)  evaluate a simulated criminal case; and

(G)  conduct a mock trial demonstrating understanding of the criminal trial procedure.

(6)  The student explains the structure and provisions of the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights and how they impact the criminal trial process. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply the police responsibilities under the Fourth Amendment regarding search and seizure in a simulated arrest scenario;

(B)  determine if a search initiated in a scenario is proper under the provisions of the Fourth Amendment;

(C)  analyze the exclusionary rule and the fruit of the poisonous tree doctrine to determine if evidence obtained in an illegal search scenario is admissible in court;

(D)  explain the impact of the Eighth, Ninth, and Tenth amendments on the criminal justice system;

(E)  analyze the effect of landmark cases such as Miranda v. Arizona, Weeks v. United States, Mapp v. Ohio, Douglas v. California, and Escobedo v. Illinois on individuals entering the criminal justice system;

(F)  describe the due process rights of a criminal suspect in the trial and sentencing process; and

(G)  explain the impact of the Fifth and Sixth amendments on the criminal trial process.

Source: The provisions of this §130.340 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.341. Federal Law Enforcement and Protective Services (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and providing legal services, public safety, protective services, and homeland security, including professional and technical support services.

(3)  Federal Law Enforcement and Protective Services provides the knowledge and skills necessary to prepare for certification in security services for federal law enforcement and protective services. The course provides an overview of security elements and types of organizations with a focus on security measures used to protect lives, property, and proprietary information, to ensure computer security, to provide information assurance, and to prevent cybercrime.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to achieve business and industry employability skills standards such as attendance, on-time arrival, meeting deadlines, working toward personal/team goals every day, and ethical use of technology.

(2)  The student demonstrates professional standards as required by federal law enforcement and protective services. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate positive work behaviors and attitudes and professional standards in federal law enforcement and protective services;

(B)  support and apply ethical reasoning to a variety of simulation situations in order to make ethical decisions;

(C)  demonstrate teamwork skills through working cooperatively with others to achieve tasks such as team building, consensus, continuous improvement, respect of opinions of others, cooperation, adaptability, and conflict resolution;

(D)  demonstrate sensitivity to and value for diversity and confidentiality; and

(E)  demonstrate an understanding of content, technical concepts, and vocabulary when analyzing information, following directions, conveying information, and accessing information sources such as texts, Internet websites, and technical materials.

(3)  The student explores the history of federal law enforcement and protective services in the United States. The student is expected to:

(A)  research the development of federal law enforcement and protective services through the history of the United States; and

(B)  explain the importance of the interface between federal law enforcement and protective services and other aspects of law enforcement.

(4)  The student identifies health, safety, and environmental responsibilities of federal law enforcement and protective services personnel in establishing and maintaining a safe work environment. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify workplace hazards to health, safety, and the environment;

(B)  inspect a workplace to identify potential health, safety, and environmental problems;

(C)  investigate and document findings in simulated workplace incidents and accidents; and

(D)  summarize issues and problems associated with hazardous materials.

(5)  The student analyzes the impact of ethical and legal responsibilities relevant to federal law enforcement and protective services. The student is expected to:

(A)  differentiate between civil and criminal law;

(B)  analyze the impact of legal issues relevant to federal law enforcement and protective services;

(C)  describe the importance of good public relations techniques as they relate to federal law enforcement and protective services and crisis situations;

(D)  analyze the connections between constitutional and federal laws, federal law enforcement, and private security operations by referencing relevant constitutional amendments;

(E)  analyze specific federal, state, and local laws and regulations affecting government security operations;

(F)  summarize specific juvenile laws affecting security operations;

(G)  compare alternative responses in simulated security scenarios that require application of ethical and legal behavior;

(H)  discuss the possible ramifications of unethical behavior on the part of security professionals;

(I)  analyze the importance of the Fourth Amendment with respect to security officer powers of arrest, search, and seizure;

(J)  summarize the due process rights granted to individuals by the Fifth Amendment during an interrogation;

(K)  analyze the impact of the Fourteenth Amendment as it relates to due process and equal protection of the law; and

(L)  analyze the importance of social media and be familiar with its effects on federal law enforcement and protective services.

(6)  The student explains risk management principles as they apply to security functions for the protection of assets. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe the sources of natural, intentional, and unintentional threats such as information assurance, computer security, cybercrime, human trafficking, border security, and domestic and foreign terrorism;

(B)  present examples that depict potential physical, electronic, procedural, and personnel vulnerabilities;

(C)  summarize the concept of risk management from a local, state, federal, and national security perspective, including the importance of knowing what to protect and the consequences of loss; and

(D)  explain how security operations and the criminal justice field interface and rely upon each other.

(7)  The student analyzes the role of computer forensics in security operations. The student is expected to:

(A)  summarize the role of computer applications relating to forensics investigations; and

(B)  investigate criminal activity in areas such as cybercrime, the Internet, and Internet trafficking.

(8)  The student analyzes security systems and their role in an overall security strategy. The student is expected to:

(A)  summarize the purposes, types, and applications of physical and electronic access control systems, surveillance systems, and intrusion detection systems;

(B)  analyze how physical and electronic systems work together as an integrated system to support an overall protection strategy; and

(C)  analyze the roles of security surveys, inspections, and exercises to test existing protection measures.

(9)  The student investigates disaster response in emergency situations as it relates to the duties of a security officer for the protection of persons, property, and information. The student is expected to:

(A)  summarize the characteristics of terrorism as a criminal act; and

(B)  examine the elements and techniques of critical infrastructure protection to reduce the risk to key terrorist targets and the impact of natural disasters.

(10)  The student recognizes the role of intelligence analysis in crime prevention and homeland security. The student is expected to:

(A)  summarize the steps of the intelligence cycle such as planning, collection, collation, evaluation, analysis, dissemination, and feedback; and

(B)  execute a crime pattern analysis identifying links between a given crime and a set of potentially related incidents.

(11)  The student applies crime prevention concepts. The student is expected to:

(A)  diagram the crime triangle of ability, opportunity, and motive;

(B)  describe the concepts of deter, detect, delay, and deny; and

(C)  evaluate the security of a business or residence by using crime prevention through environmental design strategies.

(12)  The student evaluates situations requiring the use of force. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate the use of the force continuum in simulated situations requiring varied degrees of force; and

(B)  explain the guidelines and restrictions imposed by state and federal governments related to the use of deadly force.

(13)  The student analyzes procedures and protocols for self-defense in homeland security and protective services. The student is expected to demonstrate self-defense and defensive tactics such as ready stance, escort positions, strikes, kicks, punches, handcuffing, and searching.

(14)  The student recognizes the importance of critical infrastructures and key assets. The student is expected to:

(A)  discuss the importance of critical infrastructure and key assets within federal law enforcement and protective services such as water, power and energy, information, transportation, banking and finance, defense, postal and shipping, agricultural and food, public health, and emergency services; and

(B)  create a plan of action for city and state for situations involving threats to critical infrastructure and key assets.

(15)  The student identifies chemical and biological threat identification, protection, detection, and decontamination concepts. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze research on the cause and effects of chemical threats such as airborne pathogens and toxic, nuclear, biological, and manmade chemicals; and

(B)  create research projects on the cause and effects of chemical threats such as airborne pathogens and toxic, nuclear, biological, and manmade chemicals.

(16)  The student recognizes law enforcement roles in preparedness and response systems for disaster situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop a plan of action for disaster preparedness within home, school, or community;

(B)  evaluate the effectiveness of the actions in place for all natural disasters;

(C)  evaluate the effectiveness of preparedness and response systems during and after a disaster;

(D)  appraise a disaster situation to determine the appropriate course of action;

(E)  examine and implement the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) guidelines for home, school, or community such as fire safety, disaster medical operations, search and rescue, and terrorism; and

(F)  construct a CERT disaster simulation within the school or community.

Source: The provisions of this §130.341 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.342. Practicum in Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and providing legal services, public safety, protective services, and homeland security, including professional and technical support services.

(3)  The practicum course is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills in law, public safety, corrections, and security. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to achieve business and industry employability skills standards such as attendance, on-time arrival, meeting deadlines, working toward personal/team goals every day, and ethical use of technology.

(2)  The student demonstrates professional standards as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  adhere to policies and procedures;

(B)  demonstrate positive work behaviors and attitudes such as punctuality, time management, initiative, and cooperation;

(C)  accept constructive criticism;

(D)  apply ethical reasoning to a variety of situations in order to make ethical decisions;

(E)  complete tasks with the highest standards to ensure quality services;

(F)  describe professional standards in law, public safety, corrections, and security careers such as dress, grooming, and personal protective equipment as appropriate; and

(G)  comply with practicum setting safety such as rules and regulations to maintain safe and healthful working conditions and environments.

(3)  The student applies concepts of critical thinking and problem solving. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze elements of a problem to develop creative and innovative solutions;

(B)  critically analyze information to determine its value for the problem-solving task;

(C)  compare and contrast alternatives using a variety of critical-thinking skills; and

(D)  conduct technical research to gather information necessary for decision making.

(4)  The student demonstrates leadership and teamwork skills in collaborating with others to accomplish goals and objectives. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze leadership characteristics such as trust, positive attitude, integrity, and willingness to accept key responsibilities in a work situation;

(B)  demonstrate teamwork skills through working cooperatively with others to achieve tasks;

(C)  demonstrate teamwork processes that promote skills such as team building, consensus, continuous improvement, respect for the opinions of others, cooperation, adaptability, and conflict resolution;

(D)  demonstrate responsibility for shared group and individual work tasks;

(E)  maintain effective working relationships in order to accomplish objectives and tasks;

(F)  demonstrate effective working relationships using interpersonal skills;

(G)  apply positive interpersonal skills to work cooperatively with others;

(H)  demonstrate respect for individuals such as those from different cultures, genders, and backgrounds; and

(I)  demonstrate sensitivity to and value for diversity.

(5)  The student demonstrates verbal, nonverbal, and written communication skills in creating, expressing, and interpreting information and ideas, including technical terminology and information. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate the use of content, technical concepts, and vocabulary when analyzing information and following directions;

(B)  employ verbal skills when obtaining and conveying information;

(C)  access information sources for occupational tasks using technical materials and informational texts such as Internet websites;

(D)  evaluate the reliability of information from technical materials, resources, and informational texts such as Internet websites;

(E)  interpret verbal and nonverbal behaviors to enhance communication;

(F)  apply active listening skills to obtain and clarify information; and

(G)  use academic skills to facilitate effective written and verbal communication such as emails, texting, and written documents.

(6)  The student demonstrates technical knowledge and skills required to pursue a career in the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop advanced technical knowledge and skills related to the student's occupational objective;

(B)  evaluate strengths and weaknesses in technical skill proficiency; and

(C)  accept critical feedback provided by the supervisor.

(7)  The student documents technical knowledge and skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  update a professional portfolio reflecting items such as work quality and productivity; technical skills; problem solving; creativity and innovation; communication skills; teamwork and flexibility; initiative and self-direction; accountability and integrity; attendance; licensures or certifications, including awards and scholarships, extended learning experiences, community service, and active participation in career and technical student and professional organizations; abstract of technical competencies mastered during the practicum; updated and current resume; samples of work; and evaluation from the practicum supervisor; and

(B)  present the portfolio to interested stakeholders.

Source: The provisions of this §130.342 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 9123.


§130.343. Extended Practicum in Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster. Corequisite: Practicum in Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security. This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and providing legal services, public safety, protective services, and homeland security, including professional and technical support services.

(3)  Extended Practicum in Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills in law, public safety, corrections, and security. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  participate in a paid or unpaid, laboratory- or work-based application of previously studied knowledge and skills related to law, public safety, corrections, or security;

(B)  participate in training, education, or preparation for licensure, certification, or other relevant credentials to prepare for employment;

(C)  demonstrate professional standards and personal qualities needed to be employable such as self-discipline, positive attitude, integrity, leadership, appreciation for diversity, customer service, work ethic, and adaptability with increased fluency;

(D)  use personal information management, email, Internet, writing and publishing, presentation, and spreadsheet or database applications with increased fluency;

(E)  employ teamwork and conflict-management skills with increased fluency to achieve collective goals; and

(F)  employ planning and time-management skills and tools with increased fluency to enhance results and complete work tasks.

(2)  The student implements advanced professional communications strategies. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate verbal and non-verbal communication consistently in a clear, concise, and effective manner;

(B)  analyze, interpret, and effectively communicate information, data, and observations;

(C)  observe and interpret verbal and nonverbal cues and behaviors to enhance communication; and

(D)  apply active listening skills to obtain and clarify information.

(3)  The student applies concepts of critical thinking and problem solving. The student is expected to:

(A)  employ critical-thinking skills with increased fluency both independently and in groups to solve problems and make decisions;

(B)  analyze elements of a problem to develop creative and innovative solutions; and

(C)  conduct technical research to gather information necessary for decision making.

(4)  The student understands and applies proper safety techniques in the workplace. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate an understanding of and consistently follow workplace safety rules and regulations; and

(B)  demonstrate knowledge of procedures for reporting and handling accidents and safety incidents.

(5)  The student understands the professional, ethical, and legal responsibilities in teaching and training. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate a positive, productive work ethic by performing assigned tasks as directed;

(B)  apply ethical reasoning to a variety of situations in order to make ethical decisions; and

(C)  comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations in a consistent manner.

(6)  The student participates in a supervised law, public safety, corrections, or security experience. The student is expected to:

(A)  conduct, document, and evaluate learning activities in a supervised law, public safety, corrections, or security experience;

(B)  develop advanced technical knowledge and skills related to the student's occupational objective;

(C)  examine, understand, and articulate job-specific technical vocabulary;

(D)  evaluate strengths and weaknesses in technical skill proficiency; and

(E)  collect representative work samples.

Source: The provisions of this §130.343 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 41 TexReg 614.