Chapter 130. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Career and Technical Education

Subchapter M. Manufacturing


Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter M issued under the Texas Education Code, §§7.102(c)(4), 28.002, 28.00222, and 28.025, unless otherwise noted.


§130.351. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Manufacturing, Adopted 2015.

(a)  The provisions of this subchapter shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2017-2018 school year.

(b)  No later than August 31, 2016, the commissioner of education shall determine whether instructional materials funding has been made available to Texas public schools for materials that cover the essential knowledge and skills for career and technical education as adopted in §§130.352-130.367 of this subchapter.

(c)  If the commissioner makes the determination that instructional materials funding has been made available under subsection (b) of this section, §§130.352-130.367 of this subchapter shall be implemented beginning with the 2017-2018 school year and apply to the 2017-2018 and subsequent school years.

(d)  If the commissioner does not make the determination that instructional materials funding has been made available under subsection (b) of this section, the commissioner shall determine no later than August 31 of each subsequent school year whether instructional materials funding has been made available. If the commissioner determines that instructional materials funding has been made available, the commissioner shall notify the State Board of Education and school districts that §§130.352-130.367 of this subchapter shall be implemented for the following school year.

Source: The provisions of this §130.351 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.352. Principles of Manufacturing (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12. Recommended prerequisite: Algebra I or Geometry. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  In Principles of Manufacturing, students are introduced to knowledge and skills used in the proper application of principles of manufacturing. The study of manufacturing technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities. Students will gain an understanding of what employers require to gain and maintain employment in manufacturing careers.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and comply with appropriate dress for manufacturing activities;

(B)  demonstrate positive work behaviors and personal qualities such as punctuality;

(C)  demonstrate the ability to work in teams such as developing work schedules and measuring team performance;

(D)  demonstrate an understanding of employers' application and interview processes; and

(E)  identify federal laws and rules applicable to the workplace and enforcement agencies such as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

(2)  The student applies manufacturing concepts to specific problems. The student is expected to:

(A)  distinguish between disciplines such as engineering, science, manufacturing, and technology;

(B)  use tools such as calculators and computers to solve problems; and

(C)  use a variety of measuring instruments.

(3)  The student applies communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to manufacturing activities. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B)  locate relevant information needed to solve problems;

(C)  apply mathematics concepts to solve manufacturing problems;

(D)  analyze science principles used to solve problems; and

(E)  use the appropriate units of measure.

(4)  The student manufactures products using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials, and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the processes needed to complete a project such as initiate, plan, execute, monitor and control, and close; and

(B)  use a variety of tools and equipment to produce an item.

(5)  The student practices safe work habits. The student is expected to:

(A)  master relevant safety tests based on OSHA guidelines and principles; and

(B)  use Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) to analyze, store, and safely dispose of hazardous materials.

(6)  The student describes the importance of maintenance. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform maintenance on selected equipment; and

(B)  analyze the results of improper maintenance.

(7)  The student describes the factors that affect the evolution of technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze how changes in technology affect manufacturing practices;

(B)  evaluate how the development of technology in manufacturing is influenced by past events;

(C)  analyze the international effects of technology;

(D)  demonstrate how advancements in technology have affected the field of engineering; and

(E)  evaluate the factors that affect the implementation of new ideas.

(8)  The student selects and reports on career opportunities, requirements, and expectations in manufacturing and technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  investigate an area of interest in manufacturing;

(B)  analyze the various specializations in manufacturing; and

(C)  describe the functions of engineers, technologists, and technicians.

Source: The provisions of this §130.352 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.353. Diversified Manufacturing I (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Algebra I. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  In Diversified Manufacturing I, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems and how those knowledge and skills are applied to manufacturing. The study of manufacturing systems allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings in a manufacturing setting. Diversified Manufacturing I allows students the opportunity to understand the process of mass production by using a wide variety of materials and manufacturing techniques. Knowledge about career opportunities, requirements, and expectations and the development of skills prepare students for workplace success.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate skills related to health and safety in the workplace as specified by appropriate governmental regulations;

(B)  demonstrate the standards required in the workplace such as interviewing skills, flexibility, willingness to learn new skills and acquire knowledge, self-discipline, self-worth, positive attitude, and integrity in a work situation;

(C)  use teamwork to solve problems;

(D)  identify employers' work expectations; and

(E)  use time-management techniques to develop work schedules.

(2)  The student applies academic skills to the requirements of manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills with individuals from varied cultures, including fellow workers, management, and customers;

(B)  interpret engineering drawings, charts, diagrams, and welding symbols; and

(C)  select algebraic and geometric principles and formulas required for precision measuring operations.

(3)  The student differentiates between the technical concepts that form the knowledge and skills of manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  use tools and equipment commonly employed in manufacturing in a safe manner;

(B)  demonstrate an understanding of the safety regulations for the different types of manufacturing equipment such as cutting, abrasive, boring, turning, shaping, and forming tools;

(C)  execute procedures using the different types of manufacturing equipment such as cutting, abrasive, boring, turning, shaping, and forming tools;

(D)  research the modern materials used in manufacturing; and

(E)  perform varied measurements, including precision measurements.

(4)  The student investigates emerging and innovative applications of technology in engineering. The student is expected to:

(A)  report on innovative applications of technology in engineering;

(B)  experiment with new technologies; and

(C)  experiment with different manufacturing materials such as plastic, composites, fiberglass, stone, and wood.

(5)  The student manufactures products or systems using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials, and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the processes needed to complete a project such as initiate, plan, execute, monitor and control, and close; and

(B)  use a variety of equipment and machines to produce an item to specification.

(6)  The student practices safe work habits. The student is expected to:

(A)  master safety tests developed from Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations;

(B)  analyze hazardous materials;

(C)  dispose of hazardous materials safely; and

(D)  store all materials correctly.

(7)  The student participates in a mass manufacturing project. The student is expected to:

(A)  participate in the manufacturing of a mass produced project; and

(B)  develop a method to check and maintain quality control throughout the manufacturing process.

(8)  The student identifies the factors that influence the cost of an item or service. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop a budget for a project; and

(B)  determine the most effective strategies to minimize costs.

(9)  The student describes the relationship between manufacturing and marketing. The student is expected to:

(A)  prepare a marketing plan for a product;

(B)  analyze the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product; and

(C)  analyze how customer demands influence the design of an object.

(10)  The student applies communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to manufacturing activities. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B)  locate relevant information needed to solve problems;

(C)  apply mathematics concepts to solve manufacturing problems;

(D)  analyze science principles used to solve problems; and

(E)  use appropriate units of measure.

Source: The provisions of this §130.353 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.354. Diversified Manufacturing II (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Diversified Manufacturing I. Recommended prerequisite: Algebra I. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  In Diversified Manufacturing II, students will gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems and how those knowledge and skills are applied to manufacturing. The study of manufacturing systems allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings in a manufacturing setting. Diversified Manufacturing II allows students the opportunity to understand the process of mass production by using a wide variety of materials and manufacturing techniques. Knowledge about career opportunities, requirements, and expectations and the development of skills prepare students for workplace success.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate skills related to health and safety in the workplace as specified by appropriate governmental regulations;

(B)  demonstrate the standards required in the workplace such as interviewing skills, flexibility, willingness to learn new skills and acquire knowledge, self-discipline, self-worth, positive attitude, and integrity in a work situation;

(C)  use teamwork to solve problems;

(D)  identify employers' work expectations;

(E)  use time-management techniques to develop work schedules;

(F)  explore advanced knowledge and skills required for postsecondary education; and

(G)  identify employers' expectations to foster positive customer satisfaction.

(2)  The student applies academic skills to the requirements of manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills with individuals from varied cultures, including fellow workers, management, and customers;

(B)  interpret engineering drawings, charts, diagrams, and welding symbols;

(C)  select algebraic and geometric principles and formulas required for precision measuring operations;

(D)  develop the information needed to mass produce a simple project such as flow charts, schedules, equipment lists, and material lists; and

(E)  explore the use of jigs and fixtures in mass production.

(3)  The student differentiates among the technical concepts that form the knowledge and skills of manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  use tools and equipment commonly employed in manufacturing in a safe manner;

(B)  adhere to safety regulations for the different types of manufacturing equipment such as cutting, abrasive, boring, turning, shaping, and forming tools;

(C)  execute procedures using the different types of manufacturing equipment such as cutting, abrasive, boring, turning, shaping, and forming tools;

(D)  perform varied measurements, including precision measurements;

(E)  design and develop the jigs and fixtures for a simple four (or fewer) part product; and

(F)  participate in the production run off of the product.

(4)  The student learns skills in production and programming of computer numerical control (CNC) operations. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop a CNC program using a computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) program; and

(B)  execute the CNC program to machine a product or run a simulation of the program.

(5)  The student investigates emerging and innovative applications of technology in manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  research innovative technologies in manufacturing; and

(B)  experiment with different manufacturing materials such as plastic, composites, fiberglass, stone, and wood.

(6)  The student manufactures products or systems using the appropriate tools, equipment, machines, materials, and technical processes. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze engineering properties such as the processes needed to complete a project;

(B)  analyze the processes needed to complete a project such as initiate, plan, execute, monitor and control, and close; and

(C)  use a variety of tools and equipment to produce a product to specification.

(7)  The student practices safe work habits. The student is expected to:

(A)  master safety tests based on Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations;

(B)  analyze hazardous materials;

(C)  dispose of hazardous materials; and

(D)  store all materials safely.

(8)  The student participates in the manufacturing of a mass-produced product. The student is expected to:

(A)  participate in the manufacturing of products; and

(B)  develop a method to check and maintain quality control throughout the manufacturing process.

(9)  The student identifies the factors that influence the cost of an item. The student is expected to:

(A)  calculate costs associated with production of a mass-produced product; and

(B)  re-examine the manufacturing process to maximize efficiency and minimize costs without compromising the integrity and marketability of the product.

(10)  The student describes the relationship between manufacturing and marketing. The student is expected to:

(A)  prepare a marketing plan for a product;

(B)  analyze the effect of customer satisfaction on the image of a product; and

(C)  analyze how customer demands influence the design of an object.

(11)  The student applies communication, mathematics, and science knowledge and skills to manufacturing activities. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate communication techniques consistent with industry standards;

(B)  locate relevant information needed to solve problems;

(C)  apply mathematics concepts to solve manufacturing problems;

(D)  analyze science principles used to solve problems; and

(E)  use appropriate units of measure.

Source: The provisions of this §130.354 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.355. Manufacturing Engineering Technology I (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Algebra I. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  In Manufacturing Engineering Technology I, students will gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems and how those knowledge and skills are applied to manufacturing. Students will prepare for success in the global economy. The study of manufacturing engineering will allow students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings in a manufacturing setting.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe how teams function;

(B)  explain employers' work expectations; and

(C)  demonstrate knowledge of the concepts and skills related to health and safety in the workplace as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(2)  The student applies software skills to manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  use computer-aided design (CAD) software to complete a design;

(B)  analyze the results of product testing in a simulated modeling environment; and

(C)  fabricate a prototype design of a mechanical part.

(3)  The student gains skills in writing programmable logic controls so that a robot can work in coordination with a machine. The student is expected to:

(A)  use computer-integrated manufacturing techniques to simulate a manufacturing process; and

(B)  troubleshoot programmable logic circuit devices.

(4)  The student performs functions and solves problems in the electricity and electronics field. The student is expected to:

(A)  research the use of control devices; and

(B)  demonstrate the use of control devices.

(5)  The student learns skills in production and programming of computer numerical control (CNC) operations. The student is expected to:

(A)  design a product using computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) software for production on a CNC lathe;

(B)  produce a product on the CNC lathe or a simulation;

(C)  design a product using CAM software for production on a CNC mill;

(D)  produce a product on the CNC mill or a simulation; and

(E)  complete data sheets for plan, do, check, and act forms and projects.

(6)  The student knows mechanical and fluid systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify, describe, and demonstrate the use of mechanical devices; and

(B)  identify, describe, and demonstrate the use of fluid devices.

(7)  The student knows electrical and thermal systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and describe electrical devices;

(B)  demonstrate the use of electrical devices; and

(C)  research the effects of heat energy and temperature on products.

(8)  The student understands quality-control systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  research and recognize industrial standards such as International Standards Organization and Military Specifications;

(B)  explain attribute and Pareto charts; and

(C)  apply statistical process control.

Source: The provisions of this §130.355 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.356. Manufacturing Engineering Technology II (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Manufacturing Engineering Technology I. Recommended prerequisite: Algebra II, Computer Science I, or Physics. This course satisfies a high school mathematics graduation requirement. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  In Manufacturing Engineering Technology II, students will gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems and how those knowledge and skills are applied to manufacturing. The study of Manufacturing Engineering Technology II will allow students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings.

(4)  The process standards describe ways in which students are expected to engage in the content. The placement of the process standards at the beginning of the knowledge and skills listed for each grade and course is intentional. The process standards weave the other knowledge and skills together so that students may be successful problem solvers and use mathematics efficiently and effectively in daily life. The process standards are integrated at every grade level and course. When possible, students will apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace. Students will use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution. Students will select appropriate tools such as real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology and techniques such as mental math, estimation, and number sense to solve problems. Students will effectively communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations such as symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language. Students will use mathematical relationships to generate solutions and make connections and predictions. Students will analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas. Students will display, explain, or justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.

(5)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(6)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  use teamwork to solve problems;

(B)  demonstrate a work ethic that meets common employers' expectations;

(C)  use time-management techniques to develop work schedules;

(D)  describe how teams measure results;

(E)  demonstrate the skills required in the workplace such as interviewing skills, flexibility, willingness to learn new skills and acquire knowledge, self-discipline, self-worth, positive attitude, and integrity in a work situation;

(F)  communicate effectively with others in the workplace to clarify objectives; and

(G)  apply skills related to health and safety in the workplace as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(2)  The student uses mathematical processes to acquire and demonstrate mathematical understanding. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace;

(B)  use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution;

(C)  select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems;

(D)  communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate;

(E)  create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas;

(F)  analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas; and

(G)  display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.

(3)  The student applies design skills to manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  use computer-aided design (CAD) software to complete a design;

(B)  analyze the results of product testing in a simulated modeling environment;

(C)  fabricate a prototype design of a mechanical part; and

(D)  use computer-integrated manufacturing techniques to simulate a manufacturing process.

(4)  The student performs functions and solves problems in the electricity and electronics field. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop solutions to use control devices; and

(B)  troubleshoot control devices such as programmable logic circuit devices.

(5)  The student learns skills in production and programming of computer numerical control (CNC) operations. The student is expected to:

(A)  design a project using computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) software for a CNC lathe;

(B)  produce a product on a CNC lathe or simulator;

(C)  design a project using CAM software for a CNC mill;

(D)  produce a product on a CNC mill or simulator; and

(E)  complete data sheets for plan, do, check, and act forms and projects.

(6)  The student demonstrates an understanding of mechanical and fluid systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  use mechanical devices;

(B)  use pneumatics devices; and

(C)  use hydraulics devices.

(7)  The student demonstrates an understanding of electrical and thermal systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  use electrical controls;

(B)  analyze the effects of heat energy and temperature on products; and

(C)  develop an understanding of ventilation such as heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration.

(8)  The student analyzes quality-control systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply statistical process control;

(B)  determine hardness values of different materials; and

(C)  analyze attribute and Pareto charts.

(9)  The student develops a system using electrical controls and pneumatics or hydraulics devices. The student is expected to:

(A)  design a system that incorporates electrical controls and either a pneumatic or hydraulic device;

(B)  build a system that incorporates electrical controls and either a pneumatic or hydraulic device; and

(C)  test and troubleshoot the system that incorporates electrical controls and either a pneumatic or hydraulic device.

Source: The provisions of this §130.356 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.357. Metal Fabrication and Machining I (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Algebra I or Geometry. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  Metal Fabrication and Machining I provides the knowledge, skills, and certifications required for equal employment opportunities in the metal production industry. Students must have opportunities to reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate skills related to health and safety in the workplace as specified by appropriate governmental regulations;

(B)  use teamwork to solve problems; and

(C)  demonstrate the standards required in the workplace such as interviewing skills, flexibility, willingness to learn new skills and acquire knowledge, self-discipline, positive attitude, and integrity in a work situation.

(2)  The student applies academic skills to the requirements of metal manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills with individuals from varied cultures, including fellow workers, management, and customers;

(B)  interpret engineering drawings, charts, diagrams, and welding symbols; and

(C)  select algebraic and geometric principles and formulas required for precision measuring operations.

(3)  The student differentiates the technical concepts that form the knowledge and skills of metal manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the resources found in The Machinery's Handbook as well as the specifications and codes written by the American Welding Society (AWS), Canadian Welding Bureau (CWB), American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and American Petroleum Institute (API);

(B)  examine the theory of shielded metal arc welding and gas metal arc welding;

(C)  examine the sheet metal industry; and

(D)  examine the nomenclature of abrasive wheels.

(4)  The student differentiates the function and application of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in metal manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  use hand and power tools and equipment commonly employed in metal manufacturing; and

(B)  dispose of environmentally hazardous materials used in metal manufacturing.

(5)  The student applies the technical concepts and skills of the machining industry to simulated and actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  use various work mounting procedures on all appropriate machines;

(B)  operate machine tools such as drill press, lathe, saw, grinders, and milling machines;

(C)  execute lathe procedures such as cutting threads, turning tapers, drilling, reaming, polishing, knurling, and boring; and

(D)  execute milling procedures such as milling flat surfaces, bevels, chamfers, grooves, and key-way seats needed to machine precision pieces.

(6)  The student applies the technical concepts and skills of the welding industry to simulated and actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform cutting processes such as straight cuts, bevel cuts, and hole piercing with oxy-fuel and plasma;

(B)  use the common types of electrodes with the shield metal arc welding process;

(C)  practice using gas metal arc welding to weld in multiple positions to produce groove and fillet welds; and

(D)  inspect groove and fillet welds to AWS, CWB, ANSI, and API codes.

(7)  The student applies the technical concepts and skills of the sheet metal industry to simulate actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  use mathematics in precision measuring operations; and

(B)  interpret, engineering drawings, charts, and diagrams as related to the sheet metal industry.

(8)  The student differentiates the concepts that form the technical knowledge and skills of sheet metal manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the types, sizes, and properties of sheet metal materials;

(B)  analyze the fundamentals of oxy-fuel processes as related to sheet metal; and

(C)  analyze the fundamentals of shielded metal arc welding and gas metal arc welding as related to sheet metal under various AWS codes.

(9)  The student understands the function and application of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in sheet metal manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  practice safe use of equipment; and

(B)  dispose of hazardous materials used in sheet metal manufacturing.

(10)  The student applies the knowledge and skills of sheet metal manufacturing in simulated and actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  draw simple metal layouts; and

(B)  construct common sheet metal seams.

Source: The provisions of this §130.357 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.358. Metal Fabrication and Machining II (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Metal Fabrication and Machining I. Recommended prerequisites: Geometry and Algebra II. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  Metal Fabrication and Machining II builds on the knowledge, skills, and certifications students acquire in Metal Fabrication and Machining I. Students will develop advanced concepts and skills as related to personal and career development. This course integrates academic and technical knowledge and skills. Students will have opportunities to reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  determine advanced knowledge and skills required to gain industry-recognized certifications;

(B)  identify employers' work expectations;

(C)  demonstrate the standards required in the workplace such as interviewing skills, flexibility, willingness to learn new skills and acquire knowledge, self-discipline, positive attitude, promptness, attendance, and integrity in a work situation;

(D)  evaluate personal career goals;

(E)  communicate effectively with others in the workplace to clarify objectives; and

(F)  demonstrate skills related to health and safety in the workplace as specified by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and other appropriate agencies.

(2)  The student describes the importance of teamwork, leadership, integrity, honesty, work habits, and organizational skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  use teamwork to solve problems;

(B)  distinguish among team roles such as team leaders and team members;

(C)  discuss Equal Employment Opportunity law in the workplace; and

(D)  use time-management techniques to develop work schedules.

(3)  The student applies advanced academic skills to the requirements of metal fabrication and machining. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate effective communication skills with individuals from varied cultures such as fellow workers, management, and customers;

(B)  successfully complete work orders;

(C)  estimate labor costs using various algebraic formulas;

(D)  interpret advanced engineering drawings, charts, diagrams, and welding symbols; and

(E)  demonstrate calculation of precision measuring operations using algebra, geometry, and trigonometry.

(4)  The student knows the advanced concepts that form the technical knowledge and skills of metal fabrication and machining. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze the resources found in various manufacturing reference materials;

(B)  demonstrate knowledge of the various welding processes;

(C)  examine the sheet metal industry; and

(D)  examine the advanced use of abrasives.

(5)  The student knows the function and application of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in metal fabrication and machining. The student is expected to:

(A)  operate various welding machines, cutting equipment, and grinding equipment commonly employed in metal fabrication;

(B)  demonstrate knowledge of computer numerical control (CNC) machines;

(C)  demonstrate knowledge of the concepts of automated welding machines;

(D)  demonstrate knowledge of emerging technologies that may affect metal manufacturing; and

(E)  dispose of environmentally hazardous materials associated with and used in metal fabrication manufacturing.

(6)  The student applies the advanced concepts and technical knowledge and skills of the machining industry to simulated and actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  use various work mounting procedures on appropriate machines;

(B)  examine the cutting operations such as drill press, lathe, saw, grinders, and milling machines;

(C)  execute lathe procedures such as cut threads, turn tapers, drills, reams, polishes, knurls, and bores;

(D)  mill flat surfaces, bevels, chamfers, grooves, and key-seats; and

(E)  machine precision pieces.

(7)  The student applies the advanced concepts and technical knowledge and skills of the welding industry to simulated and actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate cutting processes such as oxy-fuel and plasma;

(B)  demonstrate the use of the common types of electrodes using the shielded metal arc welding process;

(C)  use shielded metal arc welding, gas metal arc welding, and gas tungsten arc welding to weld fillet and groove welds using various positions; and

(D)  inspect welds to the American Welding Society (AWS), Canadian Welding Bureau (CWB), American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and American Petroleum Institute (API) codes.

(8)  The student applies the advanced concepts and technical knowledge and skills of the sheet metal industry to simulated and actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  estimate labor costs;

(B)  use advanced mathematics in precision measuring operations; and

(C)  interpret industrial standard blueprints, drawings, charts, and diagrams.

(9)  The student knows the advanced concepts and technical knowledge and skills of sheet metal manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze properties of sheet metal materials and fasteners;

(B)  analyze oxy-fuel processes as related to sheet metal; and

(C)  demonstrate knowledge of shielded metal arc welding, gas metal arc welding, and gas tungsten arc welding as related to sheet metal under AWS code.

(10)  The student knows the function and application of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in sheet metal. The student is expected to:

(A)  use equipment commonly employed in sheet metal safely;

(B)  dispose of environmentally hazardous materials used in sheet metal manufacturing properly; and

(C)  demonstrate knowledge of emerging technologies that may affect sheet metal.

(11)  The student applies the advanced concepts and technical skills in simulated and actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  draw advanced sheet metal layouts;

(B)  construct sheet metal seams;

(C)  construct transitions and offsets;

(D)  use the gas tungsten arc welding process in sheet metal construction;

(E)  apply the principles of sheet metal construction to the fabrication of various sheet metal products; and

(F)  apply skills in sheet metal to career preparation learning experiences.

Source: The provisions of this §130.358 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.359. Precision Metal Manufacturing I (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisite: Principles of Manufacturing and completion of or concurrent enrollment in Algebra I or Geometry. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  Precision Metal Manufacturing I will provide the knowledge, skills, and technologies required for employment in precision machining. While the course is designed to provide necessary skills in machining, it also provides a real-world foundation for any engineering discipline. This course may address a variety of materials such as plastics, ceramics, and wood in addition to metal. Students will develop knowledge of the concepts and skills related to precision metal manufacturing to apply them to personal and career development. This course supports integration of academic and technical knowledge and skills. Students will have opportunities to reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems. Knowledge about career opportunities, requirements, and expectations and the development of workplace skills prepare students for success. This course is designed to provide entry-level employment for the student or articulated credit integration into a community college and dual credit with a community college with completion of the advanced course.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  express ideas to others in a clear, concise, and effective manner through written and verbal communication;

(B)  convey written information that is easily understandable to others;

(C)  demonstrate acceptable work ethics in reporting for duty and performing assigned tasks as directed;

(D)  conduct oneself in a manner acceptable for the profession and work site such as suitable dress and polite speech;

(E)  choose the ethical course of action and comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations;

(F)  review the fine, detailed aspects of both quantitative and qualitative work processes and end products;

(G)  evaluate systems and operations; identify causes, problems, patterns, or issues; and explore workable solutions or remedies to improve situations;

(H)  follow written and oral instructions and adhere to established business practices, policies, and procedures, including health and safety rules; and

(I)  prioritize tasks, follow schedules, and work toward goal-relevant activities in an effective, efficient manner.

(2)  The student explores the employability characteristics of a successful worker in the global economy. The student is expected to:

(A)  determine academic knowledge and skills required for postsecondary education;

(B)  identify employers' expectations to foster positive customer satisfaction;

(C)  demonstrate the professional standards required in the workplace such as interviewing skills, flexibility, willingness to learn new skills and acquire knowledge, self-discipline, self-worth, positive attitude, and integrity in a work situation;

(D)  evaluate personal career goals;

(E)  communicate effectively with others in the workplace to clarify objectives; and

(F)  demonstrate skills related to health and safety in the workplace as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(3)  The student applies advanced academic skills to the requirements of precision metal manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate technical writing skills related to writing requirements found in manufacturing;

(B)  demonstrate mathematical skills such as algebra, geometry, trigonometry, statics, and conversion as applied to machining;

(C)  interpret engineering drawings, including drawings using geometric dimensioning and tolerancing;

(D)  describe orthographic and isometric views of three-dimensional figures;

(E)  evaluate mathematics as it applies to precision machining operations; and

(F)  discuss basic concepts of physics as applied to machining.

(4)  The student recognizes the concepts and skills that form the technical knowledge required in precision machining. The student is expected to:

(A)  examine the resources found in recognized manufacturing reference materials such as The Machinery's Handbook; and

(B)  demonstrate knowledge of the uses of reference charts such as tap drill charts, drill size charts, and feed-speed charts.

(5)  The student evaluates the function and application of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in precision machining. The student is expected to:

(A)  practice safety while running equipment commonly employed in machine shops;

(B)  identify and properly dispose of environmentally hazardous materials used in machine shops;

(C)  demonstrate knowledge of computer numerical control (CNC) operations;

(D)  demonstrate knowledge of emerging technologies that may affect the machine shop;

(E)  demonstrate knowledge of heating metals such as hardening, tempering, annealing, normalizing, and case hardening steel;

(F)  apply technical knowledge and skills in a machine shop to career preparation experiences;

(G)  identify basic metallic and non-metallic materials; and

(H)  compare various abrasives for type, structure, bond, and use.

(6)  The student employs skills necessary to perform bench work and layout. The student is expected to:

(A)  use equipment commonly employed in bench work and layout in a safe manner;

(B)  develop the ability to use a file to cut flats, angles, and radiuses;

(C)  employ standard layout tools to transfer a part design to the actual part;

(D)  perform center punching and hand drilling of holes using an electric or air hand drill;

(E)  perform hand tapping of holes;

(F)  perform hand reaming of holes using an electric or air hand drill;

(G)  develop a detailed layout part such as the National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Level 1 layout part;

(H)  develop a detailed bench work part such as the NIMS Level 1 bench work part; and

(I)  employ basic housekeeping skills as applied to a machine shop.

(7)  The student employs skills necessary to perform precision measurement. The student is expected to:

(A)  use equipment commonly used during precision measurement in a safe manner;

(B)  write an inspection plan;

(C)  identify and select the required measuring instrument(s) to conduct the required inspection procedure(s); and

(D)  describe statistical process control.

(8)  The student employs skills necessary to perform manual lathe work. The student is expected to:

(A)  use equipment such as accessories commonly implemented on and around a lathe in a safe manner;

(B)  analyze the advantages and disadvantages between a four-jaw independent chuck, a three-jaw universal chuck, and a collet workholding system;

(C)  indicate a part in a four-jaw independent chuck within.003" total indicated runout (TIR) using a standard indicator;

(D)  identify and describe the function of the components of a lathe;

(E)  identify and use most accessories and tooling for turning operations;

(F)  demonstrate the standard turning operations of boring, chamfering, cutting tapers, drilling, facing, grooving, knurling, polishing, threading, and turning on a manual lathe;

(G)  write a detailed process plan for turning, including appropriate processes such as feeds, speeds, tool selection, and sequencing;

(H)  develop a detailed turning part such as the NIMS Level 1 turning, chucking or turning between centers part; and

(I)  employ basic preventative maintenance on the lathe.

(9)  The student employs skills necessary to perform manual milling work. The student is expected to:

(A)  use equipment commonly used with a milling machine in a safe manner;

(B)  analyze the advantages and disadvantages of various work holding methods such as using a vise, clamping to a table, and clamping to an angle plate;

(C)  contrast the various ancillary tools used on milling machines such as a rotary table, indexing head, and super spacer;

(D)  identify or describe the function of the components of a milling machine;

(E)  tram in the head of a vertical milling machine;

(F)  locate and set a work piece in a milling vise employing a dial indicator;

(G)  develop a square block in the milling machine to close tolerances;

(H)  demonstrate various hole-making activities such as spot drilling, drilling, reaming, tapping, countersinking, and boring on the milling machine;

(I)  demonstrate various milling activities such as climb milling, conventional milling, slotting, grooving, cutting angles, and chamfering;

(J)  write a detailed process plan, including appropriate feeds, speeds, tool selection, work holding methods, and sequencing for milling;

(K)  develop a detailed milling part such as the NIMS Level 1 milling part; and

(L)  employ basic preventative maintenance on the milling machine.

(10)  The student employs skills necessary to perform work on various support equipment commonly found in a machine shop. The student is expected to:

(A)  use various support equipment commonly found in a machine shop in a safe manner;

(B)  understand basic pedestal grinder functions such as wheel selection criteria and requirements;

(C)  understand basic sawing functions such as band type, speed, and feeds for various types of material;

(D)  understand basic drill press operations, including work holding, appropriate speeds, and feeds; and

(E)  use proper safety procedures for surface grinding operations.

Source: The provisions of this §130.359 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.360. Precision Metal Manufacturing II (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Precision Metal Manufacturing I. Recommended corequisite: Precision Metal Manufacturing II Lab. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  Precision Metal Manufacturing II will provide students the knowledge, skills, and technologies required for employment in precision machining. While this course is designed to provide necessary skills in machining, it also provides a real-world foundation for any engineering discipline. This course addresses a variety of materials such as plastics, ceramics, and wood in addition to metal. Students will develop knowledge of the concepts and skills related to these systems to apply them to personal and career development. This course supports integration of academic and technical knowledge and skills. Students will have opportunities to reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems. Knowledge about career opportunities, requirements, and expectations and the development of workplace skills prepare students for success. This course is designed to provide entry-level employment for the student or articulated credit integration into a community college and dual credit with a community college with completion of the advanced course.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  express ideas to others in a clear, concise, and effective manner through written and verbal communication;

(B)  convey written information that is easily understandable to others;

(C)  demonstrate acceptable work ethics in reporting for duty and performing assigned tasks as directed;

(D)  conduct oneself in a manner acceptable for the profession and work site such as suitable dress and polite speech;

(E)  comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations;

(F)  review with a critical eye the fine, detailed aspects of both quantitative and qualitative work processes and end products;

(G)  evaluate systems and operations; identify causes, problems, patterns, or issues; and explore workable solutions or remedies to improve situations;

(H)  follow written and oral instructions and adhere to established business practices, policies, and procedures, including health and safety rules; and

(I)  prioritize tasks, follow schedules, and tend to goal-relevant activities in a way that uses time in an effective, efficient manner.

(2)  The student explores the employability characteristics of a successful worker in the global economy. The student is expected to:

(A)  determine academic knowledge and skills required for postsecondary education;

(B)  identify employers' expectations to foster positive customer satisfaction;

(C)  demonstrate the standards required in the workplace such as interviewing skills, flexibility, willingness to learn new skills and acquire knowledge, self-discipline, self-worth, positive attitude, and integrity in a work situation;

(D)  evaluate progress toward personal career goals;

(E)  communicate effectively with others in the workplace to clarify objectives; and

(F)  demonstrate skills related to health and safety in the workplace as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(3)  The student applies the technical knowledge and skills of advanced precision metal manufacturing. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply the technical aspects found in The Machinery's Handbook resource; and

(B)  select appropriate resources from the Internet as applied to manufacturing.

(4)  The student builds on the manual machining skills gained in Precision Metal Manufacturing I. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop a detailed turning part such as the National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Level 1 turning, chucking, or turning between centers part with zero defects (100% to the print) in a safe manner; and

(B)  develop a detailed milling part such as the NIMS Level 1 milling part with zero defects (100% to the print) in a safe manner.

(5)  The student learns about standard computer numerical control (CNC) machinery. The student is expected to:

(A)  research the history of numerical control machines;

(B)  distinguish among different types of CNC machines used in the industry;

(C)  demonstrate safety rules for CNC operation;

(D)  demonstrate the methods by which programs can be entered into a controller; and

(E)  use appropriate machining terminology to enhance CNC vocabulary.

(6)  The student appraises various CNC systems to differentiate the development and implementation of those systems. The student is expected to:

(A)  examine the types of drive motors used on CNC machinery;

(B)  explain the Cartesian coordinate system;

(C)  differentiate between absolute and incremental positioning; and

(D)  illustrate the difference between datum and delta dimensioning.

(7)  The student learns the process planning and tool selection within a CNC lab environment. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop a detailed process plan, including proper tool selection, feeds, and speeds, for the material being cut and finish specifications on the engineering drawing, logical sequence of operations, and appropriate inspection points;

(B)  develop a logical sequence of operations and appropriate inspection points;

(C)  demonstrate use of carbide inserts; and

(D)  apply various carbide inserts by determining the correct type, grade, style, feed, and speed for the most common materials machined in a basic machine shop.

(8)  The student evaluates tool changing and tool offset registers in the CNC lab environment. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform various types of tool changes;

(B)  demonstrate quick change tooling used on CNC milling machines;

(C)  demonstrate appropriate tool storage;

(D)  demonstrate the proper use of tool offset registers;

(E)  determine tool offset length; and

(F)  incorporate tool offsets for a set up.

(9)  The student operates a CNC lathe. The student is expected to:

(A)  use equipment commonly associated with a CNC lathe in a safe manner;

(B)  recognize, name, and describe the function of the primary components of a CNC lathe;

(C)  perform preventative maintenance checks on a CNC lathe such as checking all fluid levels, system pressure, tooling wear, and component lubrication and cleaning;

(D)  test the coolant for proper density and adjust accordingly in order to reach the correct mixture;

(E)  perform a power up on a standard CNC lathe;

(F)  demonstrate the use of the jog controls on the operator panel to jog the lathe's axes;

(G)  demonstrate the ability to locate, assemble, and measure tooling according to work instructions and job documentation;

(H)  install tools and tool holders in the automatic tool changer locations according to work instructions and job documentation;

(I)  locate and set workpiece to zero on a CNC lathe;

(J)  set any required work offsets for the part to be machined after a basic tool setting process has been completed;

(K)  set the proper geometry/tool offsets for each tool in a standard tool setting process;

(L)  operate a CNC lathe in automatic mode; and

(M)  illustrate the proper power down process on a CNC lathe.

(10)  The student operates a CNC mill. The student is expected to:

(A)  use equipment commonly found on and around a CNC mill in a safe manner;

(B)  recognize, name, and describe the function of the primary components of a CNC mill;

(C)  perform preventative maintenance checks on a CNC mill such as checking all fluid levels, system pressure, tooling wear, and component lubrication and cleaning;

(D)  test the coolant for proper density and adjust accordingly in order to reach the correct mixture;

(E)  perform a power up on a standard CNC mill;

(F)  demonstrate the use of the jog controls on the operator panel to jog the mill's axes;

(G)  demonstrate the ability to locate, assemble, and measure tooling using a presetter or other means according to work instructions and job documentation;

(H)  install tools and tool holders in the automatic tool changer locations according to work instructions and job documentation;

(I)  locate and set workpiece to zero on a CNC mill;

(J)  set any required work offsets for the part to be machined after a basic tool setting process has been completed;

(K)  set the proper geometry/tool offsets for each tool in a standard tool-setting process;

(L)  operate a CNC mill in automatic mode; and

(M)  illustrate the proper power down process on a CNC mill.

(11)  The student learns to manually program a CNC lathe without the help of computer-aided design or manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software. The student is expected to:

(A)  calculate trigonometry to determine coordinates from technical drawings to cut arcs and angles;

(B)  use trigonometry for determining cutter offsets;

(C)  use appropriate mathematical skills to solve problems while programming a CNC lathe;

(D)  write a simple program to face and turn;

(E)  write a simple program to cut radiuses, angles, grooves, and threads;

(F)  write a program using cutter radius compensation;

(G)  write a program using canned cycles such as G71; and

(H)  write a program and produce a complex part such as a NIMS Level 1 CNC lathe part with zero defects.

(12)  The student learns to manually program a CNC mill (without the help of CAD/CAM software). The student is expected to:

(A)  use trigonometry to determine coordinates from technical drawings to cut arcs and angles;

(B)  use trigonometry for determining cutter offsets;

(C)  use appropriate mathematical skills to solve problems while programming a CNC lathe;

(D)  write a simple program to perform hole operations;

(E)  write a simple program to cut radiuses and angles;

(F)  write a program using cutter radius compensation and ramping; and

(G)  write a program and produce a complex part such as a NIMS Level 1 CNC milling part with zero defects.

(13)  The student develops a deeper understanding of quality control. The student is expected to:

(A)  evaluate engineering drawings using geometric dimensioning and tolerancing;

(B)  discuss the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Y14.5M standard that defines geometric dimensioning and tolerancing; and

(C)  appraise various quality control/management programs.

Source: The provisions of this §130.360 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.361. Precision Metal Manufacturing II Lab (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This lab course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Precision Metal Manufacturing I. Corequisite: Precision Metal Manufacturing II. This course must be taken concurrently with Precision Metal Manufacturing II and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. Districts are encouraged to offer this lab in a consecutive block with Precision Metal Manufacturing II to allow students sufficient time to master the content of both courses. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  Precision Metal Manufacturing II Lab provides the knowledge, skills, and technologies required for employment in precision machining. While Precision Metal Manufacturing II Lab is designed to provide necessary skills in machining, it also provides a real-world foundation for any engineering discipline. This course may address a variety of materials such as plastics, ceramics, and wood in addition to metal. Students will develop knowledge of the concepts and skills related to these systems to apply them to personal and career development. This course supports integration of academic and technical knowledge and skills. Students will have opportunities to reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems. Knowledge about career opportunities, requirements, and expectations and the development of workplace skills prepare students for success. This course is designed to provide entry-level employment for the student or articulated credit integration into a community college and dual credit with a community college with completion of the advanced course.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  express ideas to others in a clear, concise, and effective manner through written and verbal communication;

(B)  convey written information that is easily understandable to others;

(C)  demonstrate acceptable work ethics in reporting for duty and performing assigned tasks as directed;

(D)  conduct oneself in a manner acceptable for the profession and work site such as suitable dress and polite speech;

(E)  choose the ethical course of action and comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations;

(F)  review with a critical eye the fine, detailed aspects of both quantitative and qualitative work processes and end products;

(G)  evaluate systems and operations; identify causes, problems, patterns, or issues; and explore workable solutions or remedies to improve situations;

(H)  follow written and oral instructions and adhere to established business practices, policies, and procedures, including health and safety rules; and

(I)  prioritize tasks, follow schedules, and work on goal-relevant activities in a way that uses time wisely in an effective, efficient manner.

(2)  The student builds on the manual machining skills gained in Precision Metal Manufacturing I. The student is expected to:

(A)  develop a detailed turning part such as the National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Level 1 turning, chucking, or turning between centers part with zero defects (100% to the print) in a safe manner; and

(B)  develop a detailed milling part such as the NIMS Level 1 milling part with zero defects (100% to the print) in a safe manner.

(3)  The student evaluates tool changing and tool offset registers in a computer numerical control (CNC) lab environment. The student is expected to:

(A)  perform various types of tool changes;

(B)  demonstrate quick change tooling used on CNC milling machines;

(C)  demonstrate appropriate tool storage;

(D)  demonstrate the proper use of tool offset registers;

(E)  determine tool offset length; and

(F)  enter tool offsets for a set up.

(4)  The student operates a CNC lathe. The student is expected to:

(A)  use equipment commonly found on and around a CNC lathe in a safe manner;

(B)  recognize, name, and describe the function of the primary components of a CNC lathe;

(C)  perform preventative maintenance checks on a CNC lathe such as checking all fluid levels, system pressure, tooling wear, and component lubrication and cleaning;

(D)  test the coolant for proper density and adjust accordingly in order to reach the correct mixture;

(E)  perform a power up on a standard CNC lathe;

(F)  demonstrate the use of the jog controls on the operator panel to jog the lathe's axes;

(G)  demonstrate the ability to locate, assemble, and measure tooling according to work instructions and job documentation;

(H)  install tools and tool holders in the automatic tool changer locations according to work instructions and job documentation;

(I)  locate and set workpiece to zero on a CNC lathe;

(J)  set any required work offsets for the part to be machined after a basic tool setting process has been completed;

(K)  set the proper geometry/tool offsets for each tool in a standard tool setting process;

(L)  operate a CNC lathe in automatic mode; and

(M)  illustrate the proper power down process on a CNC lathe.

(5)  The student operates a CNC mill. The student is expected to:

(A)  use equipment commonly found on and around a CNC mill in a safe manner;

(B)  recognize, name, and describe the function of the primary components of a CNC mill;

(C)  perform preventative maintenance checks on a CNC mill such as checking all fluid levels, system pressure, tooling wear, and component lubrication and cleaning;

(D)  test the coolant for proper density and adjust accordingly in order to reach the correct mixture;

(E)  perform a power up on a standard CNC mill;

(F)  demonstrate the use of the jog controls on the operator panel to jog the mill's axes;

(G)  demonstrate the ability to locate, assemble, and measure tooling using a presetter or other means according to work instructions and job documentation;

(H)  install tools and tool holders in the automatic tool changer locations according to work instructions and job documentation;

(I)  locate and set workpiece to zero on a CNC mill;

(J)  set any required work offsets for the part to be machined after a basic tool setting process has been completed;

(K)  set the proper geometry/tool offsets for each tool in a standard tool setting process;

(L)  operate a CNC mill in automatic mode; and

(M)  illustrate the proper power down process on a CNC mill.

(6)  The student learns to manually program a CNC lathe without the help of computer-aided design or manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software. The student is expected to:

(A)  use trigonometry to determine coordinates from technical drawings to cut arcs and angles;

(B)  use trigonometry for determining cutter offsets;

(C)  use appropriate mathematical skills to solve problems while programming a CNC lathe;

(D)  write a simple program to face and turn;

(E)  write a simple program to cut radiuses, angles, grooves, and threads;

(F)  write a program using cutter radius compensation;

(G)  write a program using canned cycles such as G71; and

(H)  write a program and produce a complex part such as a NIMS Level 1 CNC lathe part with zero defects.

(7)  The student learns to manually program a CNC mill (without the help of CAD/CAM software). The student is expected to:

(A)  use trigonometry to determine coordinates from technical drawings to cut arcs and angles;

(B)  use trigonometry to determine cutter offsets;

(C)  use appropriate mathematical skills to solve problems while programming a CNC lathe;

(D)  write a simple program to perform hole operations;

(E)  write a simple program to cut radiuses and angles;

(F)  write a program using cutter radius compensation and ramping; and

(G)  write a program and produce a complex part such as a NIMS Level 1 CNC milling part with zero defects.

Source: The provisions of this §130.361 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.362. Introduction to Welding (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 9-12. Recommended prerequisite or corequisite: Algebra I. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  Introduction to Welding will provide an introduction to welding technology with an emphasis on basic welding laboratory principles and operating procedures. Students will be introduced to the three basic welding processes. Topics include: industrial safety and health practices, hand tool and power machine use, measurement, laboratory operating procedures, welding power sources, welding career potentials, and introduction to welding codes and standards. Introduction to Welding will provide students with the knowledge, skills, and technologies required for employment in welding industries. Students will develop knowledge and skills related to welding and apply them to personal career development. This course supports integration of academic and technical knowledge and skills. Students will reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems. Knowledge about career opportunities, requirements, and expectations and the development of workplace skills will prepare students for future success.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  express ideas to others in a clear, concise, and effective manner through written and verbal communication;

(B)  demonstrate acceptable work ethics in reporting for duty and performing assigned tasks as directed;

(C)  conduct oneself in a manner acceptable for the profession and work site such as suitable dress and polite speech;

(D)  choose ethical courses of action such as following applicable rules, laws, and regulations;

(E)  review detailed aspects of both quantitative and qualitative work processes and end products;

(F)  evaluate systems relative to causes, problems, and patterns to improve operational situations;

(G)  adhere to business practices such as policies, procedures, and health and safety rules; and

(H)  use time wisely by prioritizing tasks and following schedules in an efficient manner.

(2)  The student explores the characteristics of a successful worker in the global economy. The student is expected to:

(A)  determine academic knowledge and skills required for postsecondary education;

(B)  identify employers' expectations to foster positive customer satisfaction;

(C)  demonstrate the professional standards required in the workplace such as interviewing skills, flexibility, willingness to learn new skills and acquire knowledge, self-discipline, self-worth, positive attitude, and integrity in a work situation;

(D)  evaluate progress toward personal career goals;

(E)  communicate effectively with others in the workplace to clarify objectives; and

(F)  apply knowledge and skills to health and safety in the workplace as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(3)  The student evaluates the function and application of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in welding. The student is expected to:

(A)  employ welding equipment according to safety standards;

(B)  identify and properly dispose of environmentally hazardous materials used in welding;

(C)  explain the importance of recycling materials used in welding;

(D)  choose appropriate personal protective equipment; and

(E)  evaluate skills related to health and safety in the workplace as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(4)  The student compares and contrasts welding joint design, material symbols, and welds. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate knowledge of welding sketches; and

(B)  identify types of welds such as fillet, groove, spot, plug, and flanged.

(5)  The student applies academic skills in relationship to welding. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate mathematical skills related to welding;

(B)  demonstrate technical writing skills related to welding;

(C)  apply accurate readings of measuring devices;

(D)  accurately use appropriate tools to make measurements;

(E)  solve problems using whole numbers, fractions, mixed numbers, and decimals;

(F)  perform conversions between fractions and decimals; and

(G)  perform conversions between standard units and metric units.

(6)  The student applies the concepts and skills of welding projects. The student is expected to:

(A)  explore careers in welding;

(B)  understand welding codes such as American Petroleum Institute (API) 1104 and American Welding Society (AWS) D1.1;

(C)  work independently to fabricate a variety of welded projects with minimal assistance; and

(D)  work collaboratively with other students.

(7)  The student performs oxy-fuel cutting processes on carbon steels. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  perform safe handling of compressed gases;

(C)  identify components of oxy-fuel gas cutting;

(D)  demonstrate proper set-up procedures for the oxy-fuel process;

(E)  identify the factors affecting the oxy-fuel cutting of base metals; and

(F)  demonstrate proper cutting techniques such as piercing, straight line, and bevel;

(8)  The student performs shielded metal arc welding principles and practices on metals. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  demonstrate knowledge of welding currents;

(C)  apply shielded metal arc welding principles;

(D)  demonstrate proper set-up procedure for shielded metal arc welding;

(E)  determine appropriate electrodes for base metal in shielded metal arc welding;

(F)  perform fillet and groove welds in all positions; and

(G)  prepare joints for welding.

(9)  The student performs gas metal arc welding principles and practices. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  apply gas metal arc welding principles;

(C)  demonstrate proper set-up procedure for gas metal arc welding;

(D)  use appropriate equipment setup for base metal in gas metal arc welding; and

(E)  perform fillet and groove welds using gas metal arc welding with various metal transfer processes.

Source: The provisions of this §130.362 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.363. Welding I (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 10-12. Recommended prerequisites: Algebra I, Principles of Manufacturing, Introduction to Precision Metal Manufacturing, or Introduction to Welding. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  Welding I provides the knowledge, skills, and technologies required for employment in metal technology systems. Students will develop knowledge and skills related to this system and apply them to personal career development. This course supports integration of academic and technical knowledge and skills. Students will reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems. Knowledge about career opportunities, requirements, and expectations and the development of workplace skills prepare students for future success.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  express ideas to others in a clear, concise, and effective manner through written and verbal communication;

(B)  convey written information that is easily understandable to others;

(C)  demonstrate acceptable work ethics in reporting for duty and performing assigned tasks as directed;

(D)  conduct oneself in a manner acceptable for the profession and work site such as suitable dress and polite speech;

(E)  choose the ethical course of action and comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations;

(F)  review the fine, detailed aspects of both quantitative and qualitative work process and end products;

(G)  evaluate systems and operations; identify causes, problems, patterns, or issues; and explore workable solutions or remedies to improve situations;

(H)  follow written and oral instructions and adhere to established business practices, policies, and procedures, including health and safety rules; and

(I)  prioritize tasks, follow schedules, and work on goal-relevant activities in a way that uses time wisely in an effective, efficient manner.

(2)  The student explores the employability characteristics of a successful worker in the global economy. The student is expected to:

(A)  explore academic knowledge and skills required for postsecondary education;

(B)  identify employers' expectations to foster positive customer satisfaction;

(C)  demonstrate the professional standards required in the workplace such as interviewing skills, flexibility, willingness to learn new skills and acquire knowledge, self-discipline, self-worth, positive attitude, and integrity in a work situation;

(D)  evaluate personal career goals;

(E)  communicate effectively with others in the workplace to clarify objectives; and

(F)  demonstrate skills related to health and safety in the workplace as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(3)  The student applies academic skills to the requirements of welding. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate effective communication skills with individuals from varied cultures such as fellow workers, management, and customers;

(B)  demonstrate mathematical skills to estimate costs;

(C)  demonstrate technical writing skills related to work orders;

(D)  apply accurate readings of measuring devices;

(E)  use appropriate tools to make accurate measurements;

(F)  compute measurements such as area, surface area, volume, and perimeter;

(G)  solve problems using whole numbers, fractions, mixed numbers, and decimals;

(H)  use various methods, including a calculator, to perform computations;

(I)  perform conversions between fractions and decimals;

(J)  perform conversions between standards units and metric units;

(K)  calculate and apply the functions of angles such as using the Pythagorean Theorem; and

(L)  diagram the parts of a circle.

(4)  The student evaluates the function and application of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in welding. The student is expected to:

(A)  operate welding equipment according to safety standards;

(B)  identify and properly dispose of environmentally hazardous materials used in welding;

(C)  explain the importance of recycling materials used in welding;

(D)  choose appropriate personal protective equipment; and

(E)  evaluate skills related to health and safety in the workplace as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(5)  The student understands welding joint design, symbols, and welds. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate knowledge of engineering drawings, charts, and diagrams;

(B)  interpret orthographic and isometric views of three-dimensional figures;

(C)  interpret engineering, drawings, charts, and diagrams;

(D)  analyze components of the welding symbol;

(E)  identify types of welding joints;

(F)  identify positions of welding; and

(G)  identify types of welds such as fillet, groove, spot, plug, and flanged.

(6)  The student analyzes the concepts and intricacies of inspections and related codes. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain weld inspection processes; and

(B)  interpret welding codes.

(7)  The student analyzes oxy-fuel cutting processes on carbon steels. The student is expected to:

(A)  practice safe operating practices;

(B)  perform safe handling of compressed gases;

(C)  identify components of oxy-fuel gas cutting system;

(D)  demonstrate proper set-up procedures for oxy-fuel cutting process;

(E)  identify factors affecting oxy-fuel cutting of base metals;

(F)  demonstrate proper cutting techniques such as piercing, straight line, and bevel;

(G)  identify acceptable cuts; and

(H)  evaluate alternative fuel gasses such as propane, propylene, and Chemtane 2®.

(8)  The student analyzes plasma arc cutting on metals. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  demonstrate knowledge of the theories of plasma arc cutting;

(C)  apply safe handling of compressed air supply;

(D)  identify components of plasma arc cutting;

(E)  demonstrate correct set-up procedure for plasma arc cutting;

(F)  define cutting terms; and

(G)  perform straight line, piercing, bevels, and shape cuts.

(9)  The student analyzes shielded metal arc welding principles and practices on metals. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  analyze welding current relationships such as alternating current and direct current, heat transfer, and polarity;

(C)  apply shielded metal arc welding principles;

(D)  demonstrate proper set-up procedure for shielded metal arc welding;

(E)  explain the American Welding Society (AWS) identification system for shielded metal arc welding electrodes;

(F)  determine appropriate electrodes for base metal in shielded metal arc welding; and

(G)  perform multi-pass groove welds in all positions to the AWS Schools Excelling through National Skills Education standards.

(10)  The student analyzes gas metal arc welding principles and practices. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  explain the effects that weld angle, work angle, and electrode extension have on welds;

(C)  apply gas metal arc welding principles;

(D)  demonstrate proper set-up procedure for gas metal arc welding;

(E)  explain the AWS identification system for gas metal arc welding filler metal;

(F)  determine appropriate filler metal for base metal in gas metal arc welding; and

(G)  perform fillet and groove welds in all positions.

(11)  The student analyzes flux cored arc welding principles and practices on metals. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  explain the effects that weld angle, work angle, and electrode extension have on welds;

(C)  apply flux cored arc welding principles;

(D)  demonstrate proper set-up procedure for flux cored arc welding;

(E)  explain the AWS identification system for flux cored arc welding electrodes;

(F)  determine appropriate filler metal for base metal in flux cored arc welding; and

(G)  perform fillet and groove welds in all positions.

(12)  The student analyzes gas tungsten arc welding on metals. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  analyze electrical welding current relationships such as alternating current and direct current, heat transfer, and polarity;

(C)  identify the common types of tungsten and filler metals according to the AWS identification system;

(D)  demonstrate proper set-up procedure for gas tungsten arc welding;

(E)  perform fillet and groove welds in all positions; and

(F)  perform welds on metals such as carbon steel, stainless steel, and aluminum.

Source: The provisions of this §130.363 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.364. Welding II (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Welding I. Recommended prerequisites: Algebra I or Geometry. Recommended corequisite: Welding II Lab. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  Welding II builds on the knowledge and skills developed in Welding I. Students will develop advanced welding concepts and skills as related to personal and career development. Students will integrate academic and technical knowledge and skills. Students will have opportunities to reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  express ideas to others in a clear, concise, and effective manner through written and verbal communication;

(B)  convey written information that is easily understandable to others;

(C)  demonstrate acceptable work ethics in reporting for duty and performing assigned tasks as directed;

(D)  conduct oneself in a manner acceptable for the profession and work site such as suitable dress and polite speech;

(E)  choose the ethical course of action and comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations;

(F)  review the fine, detailed aspects of both quantitative and qualitative work process and end products;

(G)  evaluate systems and operations; identify causes, problems, patterns, or issues; and explore workable solutions or remedies to improve situations;

(H)  follow written and oral instructions and adhere to established business practices, policies, and procedures, including health and safety rules;

(I)  prioritize tasks, follow schedules, and work toward goal-relevant activities in an effective, efficient manner;

(J)  analyze how teams function; and

(K)  evaluate employers' work expectations to measure project success.

(2)  The student explores the employability characteristics of a successful worker in the global economy. The student is expected to:

(A)  determine academic knowledge and skills required for postsecondary education;

(B)  identify employers' expectations to foster positive customer satisfaction;

(C)  demonstrate the professional standards required in the workplace such as interviewing skills, flexibility, willingness to learn new skills and acquire knowledge, self-discipline, self-worth, positive attitude, and integrity in a work situation;

(D)  evaluate progress toward personal career goals;

(E)  communicate effectively with others in the workplace to clarify objectives; and

(F)  apply knowledge and skills related to health and safety in the workplace as specified by appropriate governmental regulations.

(3)  The student applies academic skills to the requirements of welding. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate mathematical skills to estimate costs;

(B)  explain the impact of accurate readings of measuring devices on cost estimates;

(C)  justify the selection of a tool to make accurate measurements;

(D)  compute measurements such as area, surface area, volume, and perimeter;

(E)  solve problems using whole numbers, fractions, mixed numbers, and decimals;

(F)  apply right triangle relationships using the Pythagorean Theorem; and

(G)  select a mathematical formula for estimation.

(4)  The student knows the functions and applications of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in welding. The student is expected to:

(A)  use welding equipment according to safety standards;

(B)  dispose of environmentally hazardous materials used in welding;

(C)  explain the importance of recycling materials used in welding;

(D)  evaluate the performance impact of emerging technologies in welding;

(E)  use appropriate personal protective equipment to follow safety measures; and

(F)  investigate the use of automated welding machines such as numerical control, computer numerical control, and robotics-controlled welding machines.

(5)  The student illustrates welding joint design, symbols, and welds. The student is expected to:

(A)  use knowledge of engineering drawings to complete an advanced project; and

(B)  evaluate projects using engineering drawing specifications.

(6)  The student applies the concepts and skills of welding to perform tasks. The student is expected to:

(A)  work independently in fabricating welded projects;

(B)  work collaboratively with other students to complete a real-world application item; and

(C)  troubleshoot equipment.

(7)  The student analyzes the concepts and intricacies of inspections related to welding codes. The student is expected to:

(A)  inspect the welding projects of team members;

(B)  select codes for weld inspections; and

(C)  critique and evaluate the weldments of team members.

(8)  The student performs advanced cutting processes on carbon steels. The student is expected to:

(A)  observe safe operating practices;

(B)  apply safe handling of compressed gases; and

(C)  perform cutting processes according to accepted welding standards.

(9)  The student performs shielded metal arc welding on metals. The student is expected to:

(A)  employ safe operating practices; and

(B)  demonstrate skills required to make welds in all positions according to the American Welding Society (AWS) Schools Excelling through National Skills Education (SENSE) welding standards.

(10)  The student performs flux cored metal arc welding. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  perform fillet and groove welds; and

(C)  perform welds in all appropriate positions according to the AWS SENSE welding standards.

(11)  The student performs gas tungsten arc welding on metals. The student is expected to:

(A)  employ safe operating practices;

(B)  perform fillet and groove welds in all positions; and

(C)  perform welds on metals such as carbon steel, stainless steel, pipe, and aluminum to the AWS SENSE welding standards.

Source: The provisions of this §130.364 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.365. Welding II Lab (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This lab course is recommended for students in Grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Welding I. Corequisite: Welding II. This course must be taken concurrently with Welding II and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. Districts are encouraged to offer this course in a consecutive block with Welding II to allow students sufficient time to master the content of both courses. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  Welding II Lab provides an introduction to welding technology with an emphasis on basic welding laboratory principles and operating procedures. Topics include: industrial safety and health practices, hand tool and power machine use, measurement, laboratory operating procedures, welding power sources, welding career potentials, and introduction to welding codes and standards. This course provides knowledge, skills, and technologies required for employment in welding industries. Students will develop knowledge and skills related to this system and apply them to personal career development. This course supports integration of academic and technical knowledge and skills. Students will reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems. Knowledge about career opportunities, requirements, and expectations and the development of workplace skills prepare students for future success.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  express ideas to others in a clear, concise, and effective manner through written and verbal communication;

(B)  convey written information that is easily understandable to others;

(C)  demonstrate acceptable work ethics in reporting for duty and performing assigned tasks as directed;

(D)  conduct oneself in a manner acceptable for the profession and work site such as suitable dress and polite speech;

(E)  choose the ethical course of action and comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations;

(F)  review the fine, detailed aspects of both quantitative and qualitative work process and end products;

(G)  evaluate systems and operations; identify causes, problems, patterns, or issues; and explore workable solutions or remedies to improve situations;

(H)  follow written and oral instructions and adhere to established business practices, policies, and procedures, including health and safety rules; and

(I)  prioritize tasks, follow schedules, and work toward goal-relevant activities in an effective, efficient manner.

(2)  The student demonstrates the functions and applications of the tools, equipment, technologies, and metals used in code welding. The student is expected to:

(A)  use welding equipment according to safety standards;

(B)  identify and properly dispose of environmentally hazardous materials used in welding;

(C)  explain the importance of recycling materials used in welding; and

(D)  use appropriate personal protective equipment.

(3)  The student applies the concepts and skills of welding of actual work situations. The student is expected to:

(A)  work independently to fabricate welded projects with minimal assistance;

(B)  work collaboratively with other students to complete relevant projects; and

(C)  troubleshoot equipment.

(4)  The student analyzes the concepts and intricacies of inspections and related codes. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain weld inspection processes; and

(B)  produce acceptable weldments to standards related to industry codes such as the American Welding Society (AWS), American National Standards Institute, and Canadian Welding Bureau.

(5)  The student performs oxy-fuel cutting processes. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  perform safe handling of compressed gases;

(C)  assemble components involved in setting up for oxy-fuel gas cutting processes;

(D)  demonstrate proper set-up for cutting techniques such as piercing, straight line, and bevel; and

(E)  evaluate acceptable and unacceptable cuts.

(6)  The student performs plasma arc cutting on metals. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  explain the difference between safe and unsafe storage and handling of compressed gas supply;

(C)  employ proper set-up procedures for plasma arc cutting; and

(D)  demonstrate proper cutting techniques, including straight line, piercing, and bevels.

(7)  The student performs shielded metal arc welding principles and practices on metals. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  demonstrate shielded metal arc welding principles;

(C)  demonstrate proper set-up procedures for shielded metal arc welding;

(D)  select appropriate electrodes for base metal in shielded metal arc welding;

(E)  perform welds such as fillet and groove according to the AWS Schools Excelling through National Skills Education (SENSE) welding standards;

(F)  perform multiple pass welds;

(G)  prepare joints for welding; and

(H)  explain heating processes such as pre-heating and post-heating.

(8)  The student demonstrates proper set-up procedure for gas metal arc welding. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  demonstrate gas metal arc welding principles;

(C)  demonstrate proper set-up for gas metal arc welding;

(D)  select appropriate filler metals for base metal in gas metal arc welding; and

(E)  perform fillet and groove welds in all positions according to the AWS SENSE welding standards.

(9)  The student performs flux cored arc welding principles and practices on metals. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  employ and appraise flux cored arc welding principles;

(C)  demonstrate proper set-up procedures for flux cored arc welding;

(D)  appraise appropriate filler metal for base metal in flux cored arc welding;

(E)  perform fillet and groove welds; and

(F)  perform welds in all appropriate positions according to the AWS SENSE welding standards.

(10)  The student performs gas tungsten arc welding principles and practices on metals. The student is expected to:

(A)  use safe operating practices;

(B)  demonstrate gas tungsten arc welding principles;

(C)  demonstrate proper set-up for gas tungsten arc welding;

(D)  select appropriate use of filler metals for base metal in gas tungsten arc welding; and

(E)  perform welds in all appropriate positions according to the AWS SENSE welding standards.

(11)  The student performs weldment fabrications. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify layout tools;

(B)  perform a part layout on plate according to a blueprint;

(C)  perform a layout of a pipe fitting according to a blueprint; and

(D)  perform an assembly according to a blueprint.

Source: The provisions of this §130.365 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.366. Practicum in Manufacturing (Two Credits), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grade 12. The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the Manufacturing Career Cluster. Students shall be awarded two credits for successful completion of this course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  The Practicum in Manufacturing course is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and apply the employer's standard operating procedures;

(B)  demonstrate positive work behaviors such as attitudes, punctuality, time management, initiative, and cooperation;

(C)  communicate appropriately and accept constructive criticism;

(D)  research and discuss business ethics;

(E)  complete tasks such as quality products and services with the highest standards;

(F)  model professional appearance such as dress, grooming, and personal protective equipment as appropriate; and

(G)  comply with safety rules such as regulations to maintain safe working conditions and environments appropriate to the work setting.

(2)  The student applies concepts of critical thinking and problem solving. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze elements of a problem;

(B)  analyze information critically to determine its value; and

(C)  conduct technical research to gather information for decision making.

(3)  The student demonstrates leadership and teamwork skills in collaborating with others to accomplish goals and objectives. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze leadership characteristics such as trust, positive attitude, integrity, and willingness to accept key responsibilities in a work situation;

(B)  demonstrate teamwork skills through working cooperatively with others to achieve tasks;

(C)  demonstrate teamwork processes such as promoting team building, consensus, continuous improvement, respect for the opinions of others, cooperation, adaptability, and conflict resolution;

(D)  demonstrate responsibility for organization tasks such as shared group and individual work tasks; and

(E)  establish and maintain effective working relationships.

(4)  The student demonstrates oral and written communication skills. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate the use of content such as technical concepts and vocabulary;

(B)  employ verbal skills when obtaining and conveying information;

(C)  use informational texts such as Internet websites and technical materials for occupational tasks;

(D)  evaluate the reliability of information such as Internet websites, technical materials, and resources;

(E)  interpret verbal and nonverbal cues and behaviors to enhance communication;

(F)  apply active listening skills such as obtaining and clarifying the information; and

(G)  use academic skills such as effective written and oral communication.

(5)  The student demonstrates technical knowledge and skills required to pursue a career in the manufacturing cluster. The student is expected to:

(A)  use information literacy skills such as accessing, evaluating, and disseminating information;

(B)  describe information management;

(C)  maintain records to facilitate ongoing business operations;

(D)  develop goals;

(E)  prioritize tasks;

(F)  develop timelines using time-management skills;

(G)  use project-management skills such as initiate, plan, execute, monitor and control, and close to improve workflow;

(H)  evaluate proficiencies in technical skills; and

(I)  accept critical feedback provided by the supervisor.

(6)  The student documents technical knowledge and skills using a professional portfolio. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate growth of technical skill competencies;

(B)  demonstrate technical knowledge and skills by completing activities such as earning licensures or certifications;

(C)  develop an abstract of key points of the practicum;

(D)  create a job-skills resume;

(E)  collect representative work samples;

(F)  maintain copies of evaluations from the practicum supervisor and/or industrial representative; and

(G)  present the portfolio to interested stakeholders.

Source: The provisions of this §130.366 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 40 TexReg 6601.


§130.367. Extended Practicum in Manufacturing (One Credit), Adopted 2015.

(a)  General requirements. This course is recommended for students in Grade 12. The practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the Manufacturing Career Cluster. Corequisite: Practicum in Manufacturing. This course must be taken concurrently with Practicum in Manufacturing and may not be taken as a stand-alone course. Students shall be awarded one credit for successful completion of this course. A student may repeat this course once for credit provided that the student is experiencing different aspects of the industry and demonstrating proficiency in additional and more advanced knowledge and skills.

(b)  Introduction.

(1)  Career and technical education instruction provides content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills for students to further their education and succeed in current or emerging professions.

(2)  The Manufacturing Career Cluster focuses on planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering.

(3)  The Extended Practicum in Manufacturing course is designed to give students supervised practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience.

(4)  Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

(5)  Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  The student demonstrates professional standards/employability skills as required by business and industry. The student is expected to:

(A)  participate in a paid or unpaid, laboratory- or work-based application of previously studied knowledge and skills related to manufacturing;

(B)  participate in training, education, or preparation for licensure, certification, or other relevant credentials to prepare for employment;

(C)  demonstrate professional standards and personal qualities needed to be employable such as self-discipline, positive attitude, integrity, leadership, appreciation for diversity, customer service, work ethic, and adaptability with increased fluency;

(D)  use personal information management, email, Internet, writing and publishing, presentation, and spreadsheet or database applications with increased fluency;

(E)  employ teamwork and conflict-management skills with increased fluency to achieve collective goals; and

(F)  employ planning and time-management skills and tools with increased fluency to enhance results and complete work tasks.

(2)  The student implements advanced professional communications strategies. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate verbal and non-verbal communication consistently in a clear, concise, and effective manner;

(B)  analyze, interpret, and effectively communicate information, data, and observations;

(C)  observe and interpret verbal and nonverbal cues and behaviors to enhance communication; and

(D)  apply active listening skills to obtain and clarify information.

(3)  The student applies concepts of critical thinking and problem solving. The student is expected to:

(A)  employ critical-thinking skills with increased fluency both independently and in groups to solve problems and make decisions;

(B)  analyze elements of a problem to develop creative and innovative solutions; and

(C)  conduct technical research to gather information necessary for decision making.

(4)  The student understands and applies proper safety techniques in the workplace. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate an understanding of and consistently follow workplace safety rules and regulations; and

(B)  demonstrate knowledge of procedures for reporting and handling accidents and safety incidents.

(5)  The student understands the professional, ethical, and legal responsibilities in teaching and training. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate a positive, productive work ethic by performing assigned tasks as directed;

(B)  apply ethical reasoning to a variety of situations in order to make ethical decisions; and

(C)  comply with all applicable rules, laws, and regulations in a consistent manner.

(6)  The student participates in a manufacturing experience. The student is expected to:

(A)  conduct, document, and evaluate learning activities in a supervised manufacturing experience;

(B)  develop advanced technical knowledge and skills related to the student's occupational objective;

(C)  demonstrate growth of technical skill competencies;

(D)  evaluate strengths and weaknesses in technical skill proficiency; and

(E)  collect representative work samples.

Source: The provisions of this §130.367 adopted to be effective August 28, 2017, 41 TexReg 614.